Vikram Amar

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Vikram D. Amar
Born c. 1963 (age 50–51)
Nationality United States
Fields Constitutional law, Complex litigation
Institutions University of California, Davis School of Law
Alma mater Las Lomas High School,
University of California, Berkeley,
Yale Law School

Vikram David Amar (born c. 1963) is professor and the Associate Dean for Academic Affairs at the UC Davis School of Law (King Hall). Before becoming a professor, he clerked for Judge William A. Norris of the United States Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit and for Justice Harry Blackmun at the Supreme Court of the United States. After serving as a clerk, Amar worked in the Sacramento office of Gibson, Dunn & Crutcher, then began his career in legal academia in 1993 at King Hall. He joined the UC Hastings faculty in 1998, before returning to King Hall in 2007.

Amar received a BA in History from the University of California at Berkeley. In 1988 he earned his J.D. from Yale Law School.[1]

He writes a regular column for Findlaw's Writ. He also frequently appears on national radio and television programs as a commentator on contemporary legal issues.

Amar's brother, Akhil Amar, is Sterling Professor of Law at Yale Law School.

Articles[edit]

  • Adventures in Direct Democracy: Constitutional Lessons from the California Recall Experience, 92 CAL. L. REV. 927 (2004).
  • The Cheney Decision: A Missed Chance to Straighten Out Some Muddled Issues, 2004 CATO SUP. CT. REV. 185 (2004).
  • The ‘Converse Section 1983 Law’: An Idea Whose Time is Now, 69 BROOK. L. REV. 1369 (2004).
  • How Much Protection Do Injunctions Against Enforcement of Allegedly Unconstitutional Statutes Provide?, 31 FORDHAM URB. L. J. 657 (2004).
  • Lower Court Obedience & the Ninth Circuit, 7 GREEN BAG 2ND 31 (2004).
  • The New ‘New Federalism’: The Supreme Court in Hibbs (and Guillen), 6 GREEN BAG 2D 349 (2003).
  • Constitutional Sunsetting?: Justice O’Connor’s Closing Comments in Grutter, 30 HASTINGS CONST. L.Q. 541, (2003) (with E. Caminker).
  • The New Regulations Allowing Federal Agents to Monitor Attorney-Client Conversations: Why It Threatens Fourth Amendment Values, FINDLAW’S WRIT: LEGAL COMMENTARY (Nov 16, 2001) at [1] (with Akhil Amar), reprinted in 34 CONN. L. REV.1163 (2002).
  • Reasonable Accommodations Under the ADA, 5 GREEN BAG 2ND 361 (2002) (with Alan Brownstein).
  • Bush v. Gore and Article II: Pressured Judgment Makes Dubious Law, 48 FED. LAW. 27 (2001) (with Alan Brownstein).
  • Conduct Unbecoming a Coordinate Branch: the Supreme Court in Garrett, 4 GREEN BAG 2ND 351 (Summer 2001) (with Samuel Estreicher).
  • Of Hobgoblins and Equality: The Equal Protection Vision of Justice O’Connor, 32 MCGEORGE L. REV. 1 (2001).
  • The People Made Me Do It: Can the People of the States Instruct and Coerce Their State Legislatures in the Article V Constitutional Amendment Process?, 41 WM. & MARY L. REV. 1037 (2000).
  • The 20th century—The Amendment and Populist Century, 47 FED. LAW. 32 (2000). From Watergate to Ken Starr: Potter Stewart's "Or of the Press" a Quarter Century Later, 50 HASTINGS L.J. 711 (1999).
  • The Role of the People in Presidential Impeachment, ACADEMY OF ARTS AND SCIENCES BULLETIN (Fall 1999).
  • Some Questions about Justice Blackmun’s Federalism and Separation of Powers Cases, 26 HASTINGS CONST. L.Q. 153 (1999).
  • State Religious Freedom Restoration Acts and the Employment Setting, 32 U.C. DAVIS L. REV. 513 (1999).
  • The Hybrid Nature of Political Rights, 50 STAN. L. REV. 915 (1998) (with A. Brownstein).
  • Reflections on the 209 Litigation, 5 ASIAN L.J. 323 (1998).
  • The Hunter Doctrine and Proposition 209: A Reply to Thomas Wood, 24 HASTINGS CONST. L.Q. 1010 (1997) (with E. Caminker).
  • Indirect Effects of Direct Election: A Structural Examination of the Seventeenth Amendment. 49 VAND. L. REV. 1347 (1996).
  • Equal Protection, Unequal Political Burdens, and the CCRI, 23 HASTINGS CONST. L.Q. 1019 (1996) (with E. Caminker).
  • Foreword: Symposium on Developments in Free Speech Doctrine, 29 U.C. DAVIS L. REV. 465 (1996).
  • Unlocking the Jury Box, 77 POLICY REVIEW. 38 (1996) (with Akhil Amar).
  • Is the Presidential Succession Law Constitutional?, 48 STAN. L. REV. 113 (1995) (with Akhil Amar).
  • Jury Service as Political Participation Akin to Voting, 80 CORNELL L. REV. 203 (1995).
  • Some Questions about Perfectionist Rationality Review, 45 HASTINGS L.J. 1029 (1994).
  • President Quayle?, 78 VA. L. REV. 913 (1992) (with Akhil Amar).

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Faculty: Vikram Amar". UC Davis School of Law. Retrieved April 22, 2011. 

External links[edit]