Viktor Pugachyov

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Viktor Georgiyevich Pugachyov (Russian: Ви́ктор Гео́ргиевич Пугачёв) (born August 8, 1948 in Taganrog) is a Russian test pilot who was the first to show the so-called Pugachev's Cobra maneuver of Su-27 to the general public. He was named Hero of the Soviet Union in the late 1980s. He graduated from Yeysk military aviation school in 1970. Test-pilot school and MAI (Moscow State Aviation Institute). After two years with LII (Flight Research Institute named after M.M.Gromov) joined OKB Sukhoi where he tested the Su-9, Su-15, Su-24, Su-25 and the Su-27. He became famous after his 1989 Su-27 demonstrations on the Paris Airshow. Pugachev is credited with first ever non-vertical take-off and landing (VTOL) from the aircraft carrier Admiral Kuznetsov.[1]

Currently he lives in Zhukovsky and works as the Chief Pilot Designer at Sukhoi Design Bureau.

Record flights[edit]

While working as a test pilot at Sukhoi he broke 13 world records in the Sukhoi P-42:

Source: Fédération Aéronautique Internationale
Date Class (and group) Description Record Status
1986-11-15 C-1 (3) Time to climb to 3,000 m 25.37 s Record
1986-11-15 C-1h (3) Time to climb to 3,000 m 25.37 s Record
1986-11-15 C-1 (3) Time to climb to 6,000 m 37.05 s Record
1986-11-15 C-1h (3) Time to climb to 6,000 m 37.05 s Record
1986-11-15 C-1 (3) Time to climb to 9,000 m 47.03 s Improved to 44.18 s by same aircraft
1986-11-15 C-1h (3) Time to climb to 9,000 m 47.03 s Improved to 44.18 s by same aircraft
1986-11-15 C-1 (3) Time to climb to 12,000 m 58.10 s Improved to 55.54 s by same aircraft
1986-11-15 C-1h (3) Time to climb to 12,000 m 58.10 s Improved to 55.54 s by same aircraft
1990-03-29 C-1h (3) Time to climb to 15,000 m with 1,000 kg payload 1 m 21.71 s Record
1993-05-20 C-1i (3) Time to climb to 15,000 m 2 m 6 s Record
1993-05-20 C-1i (3) Time to climb to 15,000 m with 1,000 kg payload 2 m 6 s Record
1993-05-20 C-1i (3) Maximum payload to 15,000 m 1,015 kg Record
1993-05-20 C-1i (3) Maximum altitude with 1,000 kg payload 22,250 m Record

Honours and awards[edit]

This article incorporates information from the equivalent article on the Russian Wikipedia.

References[edit]

External links[edit]