Villoglandular adenocarcinoma of the cervix

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Villoglandular adenocarcinoma of the cervix
Classification and external resources
Villoglandular adenocarcinoma - low mag.jpg
Micrograph of a villoglandular adenocarcinoma the cervix. H&E stain.

Villoglandular adenocarcinoma of the cervix, also villoglandular papillary adenocarcinoma, papillary villoglandular adenocarcinoma and well-differentiated villoglandular adenocarcinoma, abbreviated VGA, is a rare type of cervical cancer that, in relation to other cervical cancers, is typically found in younger women and has a better prognosis.[1]

A similar lesion, villoglandular adenocarcinoma of the endometrium, may arise from the inner lining of the uterus, the endometrium.[2]

Signs and symptoms[edit]

The signs and symptoms are similar to other cervical cancers and may include post-coital bleeding and/or pain during intercourse (dyspareunia). Early lesions may be completely asymptomatic.

Diagnosis[edit]

The diagnosis is based on tissue examination, e.g. biopsy.

The name of the lesion describes it microscopic appearance. It has nipple-like structures with fibrovascular cores (papillae) that are long in relation to their width (villus-like), which are covered with a glandular pseudostratified columnar epithelium.

Treatment[edit]

The treatment is dependent on the stage. As the prognosis of this tumour is usually good, fertility sparing approaches (conization, cervicectomy) may be viable treatment options.

See also[edit]

Additional images[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Korach, J.; Machtinger, R.; Perri, T.; Vicus, D.; Segal, J.; Fridman, E.; Ben-Baruch, G. (2009). "Villoglandular papillary adenocarcinoma of the uterine cervix: a diagnostic challenge.". Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand 88 (3): 355–8. doi:10.1080/00016340902730359. PMID 19172445. 
  2. ^ Zaino, RJ.; Kurman, RJ.; Brunetto, VL.; Morrow, CP.; Bentley, RC.; Cappellari, JO.; Bitterman, P. (Nov 1998). "Villoglandular adenocarcinoma of the endometrium: a clinicopathologic study of 61 cases: a gynecologic oncology group study.". Am J Surg Pathol 22 (11): 1379–85. doi:10.1097/00000478-199811000-00008. PMID 9808130.