Vingis Park

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Amphitheater in Vingis Park

Vingis Park is the largest park in Vilnius, Lithuania. Located at a curve in the Neris River, it covers 162 hectares (400 acres). It is used as a venue for various events, especially concerts and sports competitions.

Vingis Park is a big center for many recreational activities. There are carousels, cafes, restaurants, and bike and rollerskate rental venues. Deeper in the forest, there is the Vingis Stadium, a great place for a morning work out.

The Amphitheater and the main square of the Park are wonderful, but deeper in the forest you can enjoy peace and quiet sitting on the bank of silent rivers. Vingis Park borders with a Vilnius' region called Žvėrynas. Just outside the Park there is the Žvėrynas Bridge, from which you can see a beautiful sight of the city in front of you, the forest behind you and the Neris river underneath you.

The Amphitheater was built using the design of the modified Estonian Song Festival Grounds in Tallinn.

The park's history dates back several centuries. In 1965 the park was renovated and adopted to the needs of mass events, such as concerts or political rallies. Several major rallies and demonstrations were held there during the course of the Lithuanian independence movement of the late 1980s; a rally on August 23, 1988 drew 250,000 people.[1]

It contains a botanical garden and an amphitheater.

Lady Gaga has performed at this venue for her first concert in Baltic country on August 21, 2012 at Vingis Park in Vilnius as a part of her The Born This Way Ball Tour in front of 14,853 people.

Many other world music stars has performed their concerts there, including Andrea Bocelli, Elton John, Bjork, Sting, Rod Stewart, Depeche Mode, and famous Lithuanian music groups like Foje, Antis. The record of most attendants was in 1997, when Foje performed their last concert - over 60,000 fans were there.

"Vingis" Park major paths and objects map

Sports[edit]

References[edit]

Footnotes[edit]

  1. ^ Vytas Stanley Vardys, Judith B. Sedaitis (1997). Lithuania: The Rebel Nation. Westview Press. ISBN 978-0-8133-1839-4. 

Coordinates: 54°41′0″N 25°14′23″E / 54.68333°N 25.23972°E / 54.68333; 25.23972