Vinologue

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Vinologue
Vinologue logo
Edited by Èlia Varela Serra
Country United States, Spain
Language English, Catalan
Publisher Leavenworth Press, Bòria Edicions
Media type Paper/Digital
No. of books 7
Website www.vinologue.com

Vinologue is an enotourism guidebook series published by Leavenworth Press in North America and Bòria Edicions in Europe. It was founded by Miquel Hudin in 2007 with Èlia Varela i Serra as editor and the guides are designed to allow those interested in enotourism to visit "Big Wines from Small Regions" as they focus exclusively on the wines as well as the gastronomy and local culture of small regions throughout the world.[1][2]

The first Vinologue Guide was for Dalmatia in Croatia and was released in 2008.

History[edit]

After several trips throughout Europe in the early 2000s the founders discovered that traditional travel guidebooks made little to no mention of the wines or the culture and gastronomy that surrounds it. In 2007 they started researching a guide for the coastal Dalmatia region in Croatia.[2][3] While researching the guide, they found the wines of neighboring Herzegovina to be of high quality as well and decided to release two guides instead of the original one.[4]

All of the guides were initially released in the digital EPUB format. They slowly added other titles such as Stellenbosch in South Africa.[5] It was in 2012 that they released their first official print guide (alongside the digital version) for the Empordà region of Catalonia due to demand from the winemakers.[6] It was the first English language enotourism guide of its kind in all of Spain.[5] This was followed by a guide in print and digital for DOQ Priorat that was released simultaneously in separate English and Catalan editions. It was the first enotourism guide and first complete guide to the internationally renown wines of the region.[7][8]

Methodology[edit]

The guides are different from other travel guidebooks in that in addition to providing travel information, history, and basic language information, they also provide reviews of the wines produced by each winery covered creating a hybrid book that is part travel guide and part wine guide, thus the name, 'vinologue' which is a portmanteau of 'vino' and 'travelogue'.[9] The guides work to make wine both approachable and affordable for any audience and they purposefully don't award numeric scores to wines given that beyond tasting notes, they believe scores to be highly subjective and personal.[3][6][10][11]

Both the print and digital editions of the guides are focused on being "21st century books" with GPS coordinates from wineries, QR Codes, and other digital media integration.[3][12]

Each guide requires a great deal of work by the authors involved as they live in the region for several months while working on the research in order to achieve a full first person point of view.[7][9][11][13] The guides are written fully independently with the wineries and other businesses mentioned not paying for inclusion and the local governmental bodies not funding publication.[14]

Titles[edit]

  • Vinologue Dalmatia (2008)
  • Vinologue Herzegovina (2008)
  • Vinologue Stellenbosch (2011)
  • Vinologue Empordà (2012)
  • Vinologue Priorat (2013)
  • Vinologue Menorca (2013)
  • Vinologue Montsant (2014)

Awards[edit]

The Vinologue Empordà guide received the Gourmand award of "Best Enotourism Book" from a United States publisher in 2012.[15]

The Vinologue Priorat guide received the Gourmand award of "Best European Wine Book" from a United States publisher in 2013.[16][17]

Popular Culture[edit]

They were the first to coin the term, flying wine to describe wines that were made in rented facilities that they winemaker didn't own. These differ from Négociants in that the wines are usually side projects of a winemaker at the winery made in their spare time primarily for experimentation as opposed to the Négociant which primarily for commercial purposes. Flying wines are often encountered in Priorat, neighboring DO Montsant, and other regions where winemaking is the dominant aspect of day to day life.[7]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Presentació de Vinologue Priorat" (in Catalan). Tresc. Retrieved 17 October 2013. 
  2. ^ a b "About". Vinologue. Retrieved 16 June 2013. 
  3. ^ a b c "Interview with Miquel Hudin". Scoutmob.com. Retrieved 16 June 2013. 
  4. ^ Miquel Hudin & Elia Varela Serra (2012). Vinologue Herzegovina. Leavenworth Press. p. 150. ISBN 978-0-983-77181-4. 
  5. ^ a b "L'editorial 'Vinologue' publica una guia en anglès dels vins i cellers empordanesos" (in Catalan). Ara. Retrieved 1 June 2013. 
  6. ^ a b "Vinologue/Big wines from small regions" (in Catalan). Ruth Troyano. Retrieved 18 June 2013. 
  7. ^ a b c "Èlia Varela i Miquel Hudin, autors de la primera guia d'enoturisme de la DOQ Priorat" (in Catalan). Vidirecte. Retrieved 14 June 2013. 
  8. ^ "L'editorial "Vinologue Priorat": la primera guia de vins completa que es fa de la DO Priorat" (in Catalan). TV3. Retrieved 27 August 2013. 
  9. ^ a b "Vinologue Priorat, la mejor guía de enoturismo del Priorat" (in Spanish). Del racimo al paladar. Retrieved 2 June 2013. 
  10. ^ Miquel Hudin & Elia Varela Serra (2013). Vinologue Priorat. Leavenworth Press. p. 432. ISBN 978-0-983-77185-2. 
  11. ^ a b "Vinologue, fent país" (in Catalan). Envinats, El Punt Avui. Retrieved 6 June 2013. 
  12. ^ "Vinologue: Guides: Dalmatia". Secret Dalmatia. Retrieved 10 June 2013. 
  13. ^ "The Vinologue Priorat Guide". Celler Lo. Retrieved 1 June 2013. 
  14. ^ "Disclaimers". Vinologue. Retrieved 16 June 2013. 
  15. ^ "Vinologue Empordà wins a Gourmand Award". Vinologue. Retrieved 15 July 2013. 
  16. ^ "Vinologue Priorat wins a Gourmand Award". Vinologue. Retrieved 12 January 2014. 
  17. ^ Gourmand Award Winners by Country 2014

External links[edit]