Viola labradorica

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Viola labradorica
Alpine Violet Viola labradorica Flower Closeup 1456px.jpg
Scientific classification
Kingdom: Plantae
(unranked): Angiosperms
(unranked): Eudicots
(unranked): Rosids
Order: Malpighiales
Family: Violaceae
Genus: Viola
Species: V. labradorica
Binomial name
Viola labradorica
Schrank [1]
Synonyms[2]
Viola labradorica growing in the Botanischer Garten at Krefeld

Viola labradorica, commonly known as Alpine dog violet, Alpine violet, American dog violet, dog violet, and Labrador violet,[3] is a perennial native to eastern Canada, Greenland, and the United States. The plant sold as Viola labradorica by nurseries is Viola riviniana.[citation needed]

Uses[edit]

Culinary[edit]

Viola labradorica has edible leaves and flowers. The leaves are sometimes characterized as "wooly" and thus not as desirable for eating.[4]

Similar species[edit]

A purple-leaved form of the European dog-violet (Viola riviniana 'Purpurea Group'), is often sold by nurseries as Viola labradorica. The true Viola labradorica is almost never sold.[5]

Viola riviana is grown as a flowering groundcover in gardens and as a house plant. It can become naturalized, or even an invasive species, when planted near adjacent native plant habitats and natural-wildland ecosystems.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Viola labradorica was originally described and published in Denkschriften der Bayer. Botanischen Gesellschaft in Regensburg 2: 12. 1818 "Name - Viola labradorica Schrank". Tropicos. Saint Louis, Missouri: Missouri Botanical Garden. Retrieved August 21, 2011. 
  2. ^ "Name - Viola labradorica Schrank synonyms". Tropicos. Saint Louis, Missouri: Missouri Botanical Garden. Retrieved August 21, 2011. 
  3. ^ "Common names for American dog violet (Viola labradorica)". Encyclopedia of Life. Retrieved 22 March 2014. 
  4. ^ Jacke, Toensmeier, Edible Forest Gardens Volume One
  5. ^ Viola labradorica 'purpurea' = V. riviniana? (what's the story). Violet Forum. GardenWeb Forums.

External links[edit]