Virginia's 3rd congressional district

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Virginia's 3rd congressional district
Virginia's 3rd congressional district - since January 3, 2013.
Virginia's 3rd congressional district - since January 3, 2013.
Current Representative Robert C. Scott (DNewport News)
Population (2000) 643,476
Median income $32,238
Ethnicity 38.6% White, 56.4% Black, 1.4% Asian, 2.6% Hispanic, 0.5% Native American, 0.3% other
Cook PVI D+27[1]

Virginia's third congressional district is a United States congressional district in the Commonwealth of Virginia. It covers all of the City of Portsmouth, all of the city of Petersburg, parts of the Cities of Hampton, Newport News, Norfolk and Richmond, all of the counties of Charles City, and Surry, and part of the counties of Henrico and Prince George. The current representative is Robert C. Scott (D).

Recent election results from statewide races[edit]

Year Office Results
1996 President Clinton 72 - 22%[citation needed]
Senator Warner 72 - 28%[citation needed]
1997 Governor Beyer 67 - 31%[citation needed]
Lieutenant Governor Payne 66 - 28%[citation needed]
Attorney General Dolan 64 - 36%[citation needed]
2000 President Gore 66 - 32%[citation needed]
Senator Robb 67 - 33%[citation needed]
2001 Governor Warner 71 - 28%[citation needed]
Lieutenant Governor Kaine 73 - 26%[citation needed]
Attorney General McEachin 63 - 37%[citation needed]
2004 President Kerry 66 - 33%[citation needed]
2008 President Obama 76 - 24%[citation needed]

Historical composition of the district[edit]

In 1788 Virginia's 3rd Congressional District consisted of all of modern Virginia including and west of the counties of Carroll, Floyd, Roanoke, Botetourt, Augusta and Rockingham. It also included what is today Pendleton County, West Virginia and also about the southern third of West Virginia which in 1788 was all Greenbrier County. This area that is today about 48 counties and 13 independent cities was in 1788 only nine counties.[2]

In the 1790 census this area had a population of 66,045.[3]

For the 1792 congressional elections the number of congressional districts in Virginia rose from 10 to 19. The only county that remained in the third district was Pendleton County. Harrison, Randolph, Hardy, Hampshire, Monongalia and Ohio Counties, all now in West Virginia were also in the district.[4] This was all of northern West Virginia except the far eastern panhandle area. The new district's 1790 population was 30,145.[5]

The 1800 Census lead to another increase in Virginia's congressional districts in 1802. The third district was again moved, this time to what was then Frederick and Shenandoah Counties in Virginia, which besides those counties also included the modern counties of Clarke, Warren and part of Page.[6] The new 3rd district had a population of 38,767 in 1800.[7]

The district's current configuration dates to 1993, when the Justice Department ordered Virginia to create a majority-minority district. At that time, portions of the old 1st, 2nd, 3rd and 4th districts were combined to create a new 3rd District. Some minor changes were made as a result of a 1997 federal court decision that the old 3rd was an unconstitutional racial gerrymander, but its boundaries have been largely unchanged since 1993.[citation needed]

List of representatives[edit]

Representative Party Term Note
District created: March 4, 1789
Senator Andrew Moore.jpg Andrew Moore Anti-Administration March 4, 1789 –
March 3, 1793
Redistricted to Virginia 2nd District
Joseph Neville Anti-Administration March 4, 1793 –
March 3, 1795
Retired
George Jackson Democratic-Republican March 4, 1795 –
March 3, 1797
Lost re-election
James Machir Federalist March 4, 1797 –
March 3, 1799
Lost re-election
George Jackson Democratic-Republican March 4, 1799 –
March 3, 1803
Retired
John Smith Democratic-Republican March 4, 1803 –
March 3, 1815
Retired
HenrySTucker.jpg Henry S. Tucker Democratic-Republican March 4, 1815 –
March 3, 1819
Elected Virginia State Senator
Jared Williams Democratic-Republican March 4, 1819 –
March 3, 1823
Redistricted to Virginia 17th District
WSArcher.jpg William S. Archer Crawford Republican March 4, 1823 –
March 3, 1825
Lost re-election
Jacksonian March 4, 1825 –
March 3, 1835
JohnWinstonJones.jpg John W. Jones Jacksonian March 4, 1835 –
March 3, 1837
Redistricted to Virginia 6th District
Democratic March 4, 1837 –
March 3, 1843
Walter Coles Democratic March 4, 1843 –
March 3, 1845
Retired
William M. Tredway Democratic March 4, 1845 –
March 3, 1847
Lost re-election
Thomas S. Flournoy Whig March 4, 1847 –
March 3, 1849
Lost re-election
Thomas H. Averett Democratic March 4, 1849 –
March 3, 1853
Lost re-election
John S. Caskie Democratic March 4, 1853 –
March 3, 1859
Lost re-election
Daniel C. DeJarnette, Sr. Independent Democrat March 4, 1859 –
March 3, 1861
Resigned
Vacant March 4, 1861 –
January 27, 1870
Civil War
Charles H. Porter Republican January 27, 1870 –
March 3, 1873
Retired
John A. Smith Republican March 4, 1873 –
March 3, 1875
Lost re-election
Gilbert Carlton Walker.gif Gilbert C. Walker Democratic March 4, 1875 –
March 3, 1879
Retired
Joseph Johnston.jpg Joseph E. Johnston Democratic March 4, 1879 –
March 3, 1881
Retired
George D. Wise Democratic March 4, 1881 –
April 11, 1890
Election invalidated
Edmund Waddill, Jr. Republican April 12, 1890 –
March 3, 1891
Retired
George D. Wise Democratic March 4, 1891 –
March 3, 1895
Retired
Tazewell Ellett Democratic March 4, 1895 –
March 3, 1897
Lost re-election
John Lamb.jpg John Lamb Democratic March 4, 1897 –
March 3, 1913
Lost re-election
Andrew J. Montague.jpg Andrew J. Montague Democratic March 4, 1913 –
March 3, 1933
Redistricted to Virginia At-Large District
District eliminated March 4, 1933
District recreated: January 3, 1935
Andrew J. Montague.jpg Andrew J. Montague Democratic January 3, 1935 –
January 24, 1937
Died
Vacant January 24, 1937 –
November 2, 1937
David E. Satterfield, Jr. Democratic November 2, 1937 –
February 15, 1945
Resigned
Vacant February 15, 1945 –
March 6, 1945
J. Vaughan Gary Democratic March 6, 1945 –
January 3, 1965
Retired
David E Satterfield 3d.png David E. Satterfield III Democratic January 3, 1965 –
January 3, 1981
Retired
TomBliley.jpg Thomas J. Bliley, Jr. Republican January 3, 1981 –
January 3, 1993
Redistricted to Virginia 7th District
Bobbyscott.jpg Robert C. Scott Democratic January 3, 1993 –
Present
First elected in 1992

Election results[edit]

Year Democratic Republican Other
1982 John A. Waldrop, Jr.: 63,946 Thomas J. Bliley, Jr.: 92,928  
1984 Thomas J. Bliley, Jr.: 169,987  
1986 Kenneth E. Powell: 32,961 Thomas J. Bliley, Jr.: 74,525  
1988 Thomas J. Bliley, Jr.: 187,354  
1990 James A. Starke, Jr.: 36,253 Thomas J. Bliley, Jr.: 77,125  
1992 Robert C. Scott: 132,432 Daniel Jenkins: 35,780  
1994 Robert C. Scott: 108,532 Thomas E. Ward: 28,080  
1996 Robert C. Scott: 118,603 Elsie Goodwyn Holland: 25,781  
1998 Robert C. Scott: 48,129  
2000 Robert C. Scott: 137,527  
2002 Robert C. Scott: 87,521  
2004 Robert C. Scott: 159,373 Winsome E. Sears: 70,194  
2006 Robert C. Scott: 133,546  
2008 Robert C. Scott: 239,911  
2010 Robert C. Scott: 114,754 C. L. Smith, Jr.: 44,553  
2012 Robert C. Scott: 259,199 Dean J. Longo: 58,931  

Historical district boundaries[edit]

2003 - 2013

See also[edit]

Sources[edit]

  1. ^ "Partisan Voting Index Districts of the 113th Congress: [prpvi2012_82cH~pspvi11~MC29] [82~PVIRANK~2B]". The Cook Political Report. 2013. Retrieved 2013-04-27. 
  2. ^ Parsons, Stanley B, William W. Beach and Dan Hermann. United States Congressional Districts 1788-1841. (Westport: Greenwood Press, 1978) p. 29
  3. ^ Parsons. Congressional Districts. p. 28
  4. ^ Parsons. Congressional Districts. p. 71
  5. ^ Parsons. Congressional Districts. p. 70
  6. ^ Parsons. Congressional Districts. p. 129
  7. ^ Parsons. Congressional Districts. p. 128

Coordinates: 37°12′49″N 76°57′04″W / 37.21361°N 76.95111°W / 37.21361; -76.95111