Virginia elections, 2009

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The following offices were up for election in the United States Commonwealth of Virginia in the November 2009 general election:

Schedule of election related events[edit]

The Virginia State Board of Elections set the following calendar of events for the November 2009 election:[1]

  • March 11 – Deadline for political party officials to request primary elections from the State Board of Elections
  • April 10 – Filing deadline for primary election candidates
  • May 11 – Voter registration deadline for primary election
  • June 2 – Application deadline for primary election mail-in absentee ballot
  • June 6 – Application deadline for primary election in-person absentee ballot
  • June 9 – Primary elections; deadline for parties to select candidates by non-primary methods; filing deadline for independent candidates
  • October 5 – Voter registration deadline for general election
  • October 27 – Application deadline for general election mail-in absentee ballot
  • October 31 – Application deadline for general election in-person absentee ballot
  • November 3 – General election

In addition, candidates must file campaign finance reports with the state or local election boards at certain specified intervals during the campaign year.[2] The three incumbent statewide officeholders and members of the General Assembly are barred by law from fundraising during the annual session of the General Assembly, from mid-January through roughly the end of February.[3]

Sufficiently large political parties (in practice, the Democratic and Republican parties) have the option of nominating candidates in primary elections. Nominees not chosen in primaries are selected in a caucus or convention process. Incumbent members of Congress and the General Assembly have the option of choosing their party's nominating method for their office; otherwise, the decision is made by a committee of party officials from the jurisdiction involved.

Persons 18 years old or older on the general election date (born on or before November 3, 1991) may register and vote in both the primary and general elections. Voters in Virginia do not register by party; they have the option of voting in any one party's primary, and may switch at will from one election to the next.

Issues[edit]

Reapportionment[edit]

In 2011 the General Assembly will redraw district boundaries for seats in the United States House of Representatives, the Senate of Virginia, and the House of Delegates, based on results of the 2010 United States Census. This is a highly partisan process, which can determine the balance of power in those bodies for up to ten years. There are three major players in the process:

  • Senate – barring unforeseen circumstances, the current senators will still be in office in 2011. Democrats currently have a 22-18 majority.
  • House of Delegates – Republicans have a 53-45 majority, with 2 independents who caucus with the Republicans. The 2009 election will determine control in 2011.
  • Governor – the incumbent, Democrat Tim Kaine, is not allowed to serve successive terms.

Governor[edit]

Party nominees
  • The Republican Party formally nominated former Attorney General Bob McDonnell of Virginia Beach, who was unopposed for the nomination, at the May 29–30 state party convention. McDonnell resigned as Virginia's Attorney General on February 3, 2009, to concentrate on the gubernatorial campaign.[4][5]
  • The Democratic Party nominated Creigh Deeds, Democrat from Bath County – Senator since 2002 following 10 years in the House; unsuccessful Democratic nominee for Attorney General in 2005, after he captured the nomination in the Democratic Primary on June 9, 2009[6]
Former candidates for the Democratic Party nomination

Lieutenant governor[edit]

Party nominees
  • Former state Secretary of Finance Jody Wagner, who resigned her position on August 8, 2008 to run,[9] won the June 9 primary to be the Democratic Party nominee. Previously she was the unsuccessful Democratic candidate in Virginia's 2nd congressional district in 2000.
  • The Republican Party nominated incumbent Lt. Governor and former State Senator Bill Bolling of Hanover County [10] at the party's May 29–30 convention.[5]
Former candidates
  • Jon Bowerbank, a Democratic energy industry engineer/entrepreneur, won election to the Russell County Board of Supervisors in November 2007 and began campaigning for lieutenant governor in May 2008. After getting his name on the primary ballot, Bowerbank withdrew on May 15, 2009, endorsing Wagner.[11]
  • Pat Edmonson, a Virginia Beach School Board member, announced her candidacy for the Democratic nomination on January 12, 2009, saying voters were "ready for a progressive voice"[12] She failed to file the proper candidate paperwork with the state by the April 10, 2009 deadline, making her ineligible for the primary,[13]
  • Patrick C. Muldoon of Giles County, an unsuccessful Republican nominee in Virginia's 9th congressional district in 1996, filed on November 11, 2008,[14][15] but lost the convention vote to Bolling.[5]
  • Rich Savage, a Democratic professional campaign consultant from Richmond, announced his candidacy on January 2, 2009[16] but suspended his campaign on March 6, citing financial pressures caused by the worsening economy.[17]
  • Mike Signer of Arlington, a former deputy counselor to Mark Warner on Homeland Security and National Guard policy and senior strategist for Tom Perriello,[18] lost the June 9 Democratic primary to Wagner.

Election results[edit]

Democratic Primary[edit]

Official results [2]:

2009 Virginia Lieutenant Governor Democratic primary
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Democratic Jody Wagner 213,059 74.29
Democratic Mike Signer 60,979 21.26
Democratic Jon Bowerbank 12,739 4.44
Majority 152,080
Turnout 286,777 5.65

General Election[19][edit]

2009 Virginia Lieutenant Governor general election
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Republican Bill Bolling (incumbent) 1,106,674 56.51 +6.04
Democratic Jody Wagner 850,070 43.40 -5.92
write-ins 1,580 0.08 -0.13
Majority 256,604
Turnout 1,958,324 39.51
Republican hold Swing

Polling[edit]

Democratic primary[edit]

Source Date Jody Wagner Pat Edmonson Michael Signer Rich Savage Jon Bowerbank Undecided
Public Policy Polling [20] June 6–7, 2009 41% n/a 12% n/a 6% 42%
Suffolk University [21] June 4, 2009 30% n/a 7% n/a n/a 62%
Public Policy Polling [22] May 28–31, 2009 27% n/a 11% n/a n/a 63%
Public Policy Polling [23] May 19–21, 2009 21% n/a 11% n/a n/a 68%
Public Policy Polling [24] May 1–3, 2009 18% n/a 7% n/a 6% 69%
Public Policy Polling[25] March 27–29, 2009 21% 4% 4% n/a 4% 67%
Public Policy Polling[26] February 28–March 1, 2009 9% 6% 5% 4% 3% 73%

General Election[edit]

Source Dates Administered Jody Wagner (D) Bill Bolling (R)
Public Policy Polling November 1, 2009 41% 54%
Survey USA October 26, 2009 42% 56%
Public Policy Polling October 19, 2009 39% 49%
Survey USA October 19, 2009 42% 56%
Washington Post October 7, 2009 40% 49%
Survey USA October 4, 2009 40% 57%
Survey USA Sept 26-29, 2009 41% 54%
Public Policy Polling Sept 25-28, 2009 35% 43%
Clarus Research Group Sept 10-14, 2009 32% 38%
Survey USA September 3, 2009 42% 52%
Public Policy Polling Aug 28-31, 2009 40% 46%
Public Policy Polling July 31-Aug 3, 2009 34% 48%
Survey USA July 27-July 28, 2009 42% 54%
Public Policy Polling June 30-July 2, 2009 40% 46%

Attorney general[edit]

Party nominees
  • The Democratic Party nominee is State Delegate and former assistant Commonwealth's Attorney Steve Shannon of Fairfax County. Shannon announced his candidacy in the fall of 2008,[27] and as the only candidate who filed for the Democratic primary, became the Democratic nominee by default.
  • The Republican Party nominee is State Senator Ken Cuccinelli of Fairfax County; Cuccinelli announced April 1, 2008,[28] and won the nomination at the May 29–30 Republican convention.[5]
  • Both candidates, Cuccinelli (Class of 1986) and Shannon (Class of 1989), attended Gonzaga College High School in Washington, D.C.
Former candidates

General Election Results[33][edit]

2009 Virginia Attorney General general election
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Republican Ken Cuccinelli 1,124,018 57.51 +7.55
Democratic Steve Shannon 828,647 42.39 -7.56
write-ins 1,772 0.09 +0
Majority 295,371
Turnout 1,954,437 39.43
Republican hold Swing

Polling[edit]

General Election[edit]

Source Dates Administered Steve Shannon (D) Ken Cuccinelli (R)
Public Policy Polling November 1, 2009 39% 55%
Survey USA October 26, 2009 41% 57%
Public Policy Polling October 19, 2009 37% 52%
Survey USA October 19, 2009 41% 56%
Washington Post October 7, 2009 40% 49%
Survey USA October 4, 2009 43% 53%
Survey USA Sept 26-29, 2009 42% 53%
Public Policy Polling Sept 25-28, 2009 34% 43%
Clarus Research Group Sept 10-14, 2009 30% 35%
Survey USA September 3, 2009 41% 54%
Public Policy Polling Aug 28-31, 2009 35% 48%
Public Policy Polling July 31-Aug 3, 2009 32% 45%
Survey USA July 27-July 28, 2009 42% 53%
Public Policy Polling June 30-July 2, 2009 38% 45%

House of Delegates[edit]

Special elections[edit]

  • 81st district (Virginia Beach, Chesapeake) – fifth-term Republican Terrie Suit, chair of the General Laws committee, resigned on October 12, 2008 to take a job as a lobbyist.[34] A special election was set for January 6, 2009.[35] Barry Knight, a hog farmer and member of the Virginia Beach Planning Commission, was selected as the Republican nominee in a firehouse primary on November 29, 2008.[36] On December 4, the Democrats nominated John LaCombe, a 24-year-old payday lending activist.[37] Knight won the special election by an 83-17 margin.[38]
  • 70th district (Richmond, Henrico and Chesterfield Counties) – Dwight Clinton Jones, a Democrat in his eighth term, was elected mayor of Richmond on November 4, 2008. This special election was also scheduled for January 6, 2009.[35] On December 6, 2008, the Democratic Party nominated Delores McQuinn, a member of Richmond City Council, for the seat.[39] McQuinn was unopposed in the special election.
  • 46th district (Alexandria, Fairfax County) – Brian Moran resigned his seat December 12, 2008 to concentrate on his campaign for Governor.[8] A special election was called for January 13, 2009.[40] Both major parties held nominating caucuses on December 16, 2008. The Democratic nominee was Charniele Herring, an attorney from Alexandria. The Republicans nominated Joe Murray, an aide to U. S. Representative Joe Wilson of South Carolina.[41] Herring won the election by 16 votes; the House, under Republican control, refused to seat her pending a recount requested by Murray.[42] Herring was finally seated after a recount on January 26.[43]

Retirements[edit]

As of July 17, 2009, ten House members had announced they would not run for re-election:

In addition, Bob Hull (D-Fairfax) was defeated for renomination by Kaye Kory in the June 9 primary.[53]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Virginia State Board of Elections; 2009 Election Calendar
  2. ^ "Code of Virginia § 24.2-947.6. Filing schedule for candidates for office; November elections.". Retrieved 2008-08-16. 
  3. ^ "Code of Virginia § 24.2-954. Campaign fundraising; legislative session; penalties.". Retrieved 2008-08-20. 
  4. ^ Walker, Julian (2009-02-03). "Attorney General McDonnell resigning to run for governor". The Virginian-Pilot. Retrieved 2009-02-03. 
  5. ^ a b c d e f McDonnell accepts GOP nomination for Va. governor
  6. ^ Kumar, Anita (June 11, 2009). "Va. Gubernatorial Candidates Off to Fast Start". The Washington Post. Retrieved May 27, 2010. 
  7. ^ Schapiro, Jeff (2008-11-11). "McAuliffe announces statewide tour; Ex-DNC chairman forms committee to explore run for Va. governor in 2009". Richmond Times-Dispatch. Retrieved 2008-11-14. [dead link]
  8. ^ a b Craig, Tim (2008-12-13). "Moran Resigns From Va. Assembly; Delegate Post Left For Governor Bid". Washington Post. p. B1. Retrieved 2008-12-12. 
  9. ^ Walker, Julian (2008-08-16). "Jody Wagner announces bid for lieutenant governor in 2009". The Virginian-Pilot. p. 3, Hampton Roads section. Retrieved 2008-08-16. 
  10. ^ Lewis, Bob (March 24, 2008). "Va.'s Lt. Gov. to Seek Re-Election". Associated Press (The Washington Post). Retrieved 2008-03-25. 
  11. ^ "Bowerbank quits Democratic contest for lieutenant governor, backs Jody Wagner". Richmond Times-Dispatch. 2009-05-15. Retrieved 2009-05-15. 
  12. ^ "Board Member to Run for Lt. Gov.". Virginian-Pilot. 2009-01-13. p. 2, Hampton Roads section. 
  13. ^ Whitely, Tyler (2009-04-10). "Edmonson won’t be a candidate for lieutenant governor". Richmond Times-Dispatch. Retrieved 2009-04-11. 
  14. ^ Whitley, Tyler (2008-11-11). "Muldoon seeks to be lieutenant governor". Richmond Times-Dispatch. Retrieved 2008-11-14. [dead link]
  15. ^ "Commonwealth of Virginia; Election Results; November 5, 1996 General Election; Congressional District 009". Virginia State Board of Elections. Retrieved 2008-11-14. [dead link]
  16. ^ Schapiro, Jeff E. (2009-01-02). "Third Va. Democrat declares for lieutenant governor". Richmond Times-Dispatch. Retrieved 2009-01-03. 
  17. ^ Schapiro, Jeff E. (2009-03-06). "One of five Democrats running for lieutenant governor drops bid". Richmond Times-Dispatch. Retrieved 2009-03-06. 
  18. ^ "Virginia Is for Consultant Candidates". Roll Call (Roll Call Inc.). 2/12/09. Retrieved 2009-02-16. 
  19. ^ http://www.sbe.virginia.gov/cms/Election_Information/Election_Results/2009/November_General_Election.html?race=LTGOV
  20. ^ "Deeds opens up lead". Public Policy Polling. 2009-06-07. 
  21. ^ "Virginia Primary Statewide". Suffolk University. 2009-06-04. 
  22. ^ "Anyone's Game in VIrginia". Public Policy Polling. 2009-06-02. 
  23. ^ "Deeds Pulls Closer; McAuliffe Still Leads". Public Policy Polling. 2009-05-22. 
  24. ^ "McAuliffe takes lead in primary contest". Public Policy Polling. 2009-05-05. 
  25. ^ "Virginia primary race remains up for grabs". Public Policy Polling. 2009-03-29. 
  26. ^ "Tight field in Virginia primary". Public Policy Polling. 2009-03-01. 
  27. ^ "Steve Shannon, Attorney General". Retrieved 2008-11-24. 
  28. ^ Gardner, Amy (2008-04-01). "N.Va. Conservative to Run for Attorney General". Washington Post. p. B.1. 
  29. ^ "Breaking News: John Brownlee Announces Press Conference for May 20, 2008 to Announce Plans to Run for Virginia Attorney General". Virginia Qui Tam Law.com. 2008-05-19. Retrieved 2008-08-16. 
  30. ^ Sluss, Michael (2008-10-16). "Fishwick explores political waters; The Roanoke lawyer is considering running for state attorney general in the 2009 election". Roanoke Times. Retrieved 2008-10-17. 
  31. ^ Sluss, Michael (2009-01-05). "Roanoke lawyer won't run for attorney general's nomination". Roanoke Times. Retrieved 2009-01-05. 
  32. ^ Kumar, Anita (2008-05-01). "Arlington's Foster May Run for Attorney General". The Washington Post. Retrieved 2008-08-16. 
  33. ^ http://www.sbe.virginia.gov/cms/Election_Information/Election_Results/2009/November_General_Election.html?race=ATTGEN
  34. ^ Walker, Julian (2008-09-09). "Virginia Beach Del. Terrie Suit will resign to become lobbyist". Virginian-Pilot. Retrieved 2008-12-02. 
  35. ^ a b "Candidacy Requirements for House of Delegates, 70th and 81st Districts, January 6, 2009 Special Elections". Virginia State Board of Elections. 2008-11-25. Retrieved 2008-12-12. 
  36. ^ Warren, John (2008-11-30). "Knight wins GOP nod for vacant House of Delegates seat". Virginian-Pilot. Retrieved 2008-12-02. 
  37. ^ Warren, John (2008-12-04). "Democrats choose political newcomer for 81st District". Virginian-Pilot. Retrieved 2008-12-06. 
  38. ^ "January 6, 2009 Unofficial Election Results". Virginia State Board of Elections. Retrieved 2009-01-07. 
  39. ^ "McQuinn nominated in Richmond-area House district". Richmond Times-Dispatch. 2008-12-06. Retrieved 2008-12-06. 
  40. ^ "Candidacy Requirements for House of Delegates, 46 District, January 13, 2009 Special Elections". Virginia State Board of Elections. 2008-12-12. Retrieved 2008-12-12. 
  41. ^ Craig, Tim (2008-12-16). "Herring Defeats Gonzalez; Murray Wins GOP Nod". Washington Post. Retrieved 2008-12-31. 
  42. ^ "Va. Legislature Opens With Conflict Over Special Election". MyFox, Washington D.C. 2009-01-14. Retrieved 2009-01-15. 
  43. ^ Meola, Olympia (2009-01-26). "Va. House swears in delegate after recount". Richmond Times-Dispatch. Retrieved 2009-01-26. 
  44. ^ Associated Press (2009-01-22). "Eisenberg announces retirement from House". Hampton Roads Daily Press. 
  45. ^ Whitley, Tyler. "Hanover Del. Hargrove won’t run again". Richmond Times-Dispatch. 
  46. ^ "Embattled Va. GOP head giving up House seat". Richmond Times-Dispatch. 2009-02-13. 
  47. ^ Walker, Julian (2009-02-25). "Portsmouth's Del. Melvin moving on after two decades". The Virginian-Pilot. 
  48. ^ Stuss, Michael (2008-02-28). "Fralin announces retirement from House of Delegates". The Roanoke Times. 
  49. ^ Meola, Olympia (2009-03-09). "Del. Clarke Hogan says he won’t seek another term". Richmond Times-Dispatch. 
  50. ^ Whitley, Tyler (2009-03-28). "Franklin P. Hall to retire from House of Delegates". Richmond Times-Dispatch. 
  51. ^ Amundson to retire, Surovell to run
  52. ^ Saxman giving up seat in house
  53. ^ [1]

References[edit]

External links[edit]