Visilizumab

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Visilizumab ?
Monoclonal antibody
Type Whole antibody
Source Humanized (from mouse)
Target CD3 receptor
Clinical data
Legal status
?
Identifiers
CAS number  YesY
ATC code None
Chemical data
Formula ?
 YesY (what is this?)  (verify)

Visilizumab (tentative trade name Nuvion, PDL BioPharma Inc.) is a humanized monoclonal antibody. It is being investigated for use as an immunosuppressive drug in patients with ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease. Visilizumab binds to the CD3 receptor on certain activated T cells without affecting resting T cells. It is currently under clinical studies for the treatment of ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease.[1]

PDL BioPharma, Inc. canceled production of visilizumab following its Phase II/III clinical trials, citing its inefficacy and poor safety profile compared to other drugs on the market as the major reasons.[2] Nevertheless, clinical trials continue for various diseases like multiple myeloma[3] and diabetes mellitus type 1[4][5] as of July 2009.

Visilizumab has also been radiolabelled with technetium-99m for imaging T cells.[6]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "PDL BioPharma, Development Pipeline - Nuvion (visilizumab)". Archived from the original on 2007-09-15. Retrieved 2008-02-11. 
  2. ^ "PDL Lands in a Hazard". Retrieved 2009-05-27. 
  3. ^ "Treated T Cells Followed by a Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With Multiple Myeloma". ClinicalTrials.gov. Retrieved 2010-03-15. 
  4. ^ Kaufman, A; Herold, KC (2009). "Anti-CD3 mAbs for treatment of type 1 diabetes". Diabetes/metabolism research and reviews 25 (4): 302–6. doi:10.1002/dmrr.933. PMID 19319985. 
  5. ^ "Anti-CD3 mAb Treatment of Recent Onset Type 1 Diabetes". ClinicalTrials.gov. 
  6. ^ Malviya, G; D'alessandria, C; Bonanno, E; Vexler, V; Massari, R; Trotta, C; Scopinaro, F; Dierckx, R; Signore, A (2009). "Radiolabeled Humanized Anti-CD3 Monoclonal Antibody Visilizumab for Imaging Human T-Lymphocytes". Journal of Nuclear Medicine 50 (10): 1683–91. doi:10.2967/jnumed.108.059485. PMID 19759100.