Visual.ly

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Visual.ly
Visually logo.png
Web address http://visual.ly
Slogan Infographics & Data Visualizations
Commercial? Yes
Type of site data visualization
Available in English
Owner Stew Langille (CEO), Lee Sherman (Chief Content Officer), Tal Siach (Chief Marketing Officer)
Launched 2011
Current status Active

Visual.ly is a community platform for data visualization and infographics.[1] It was founded by Stew Langille, Lee Sherman, Tal Siach, and Adam Breckler in 2011.

History[edit]

Visual.ly was inspired by the founders’ time at Mint.com.[2] As Mint’s Director of Marketing, Langille noticed that the infographics posted to MintLife, the company blog, generated 30 times more traffic than a comparable text article.[3][4] According to Langille, “we knew we were onto something big.”[5]

In April 2011, Langille, along with MintLife’s Editor-in-Chief Lee Sherman and Adam Breckler, a Mint web developer, left Mint.com to co-found Visual.ly with Tal Siach, the founder of Walyou, an Israeli gadget site.[6][7][8] Langille states that Visual.ly aims to evolve how digital news media outlets present information, similar to how USA Today’s weather infographics transformed news outlets in the early ‘90s and how Wired’s graphic design influenced digital media in the early 2000s.[9]

In October 2011, Visual.ly announced a $2 million round in seed funding, led by Crosslink Capital, 500 Startups, and SoftTech.[1][10] At the time of the announcement, Visual.ly had 26,000 users, 7,000 infographics, and 1 million monthly page views.[1] They have partnered with the Huffington Post, CISCO, Showtime, Unicef, and Al Jazeera, among others provide infographics and data visualizations.[1][11] In December 2011, Visual.ly launched a company blog on their website.

Site structure[edit]

Visual.ly is structured as both as a showcase for infographics as well as a marketplace and community for publishers, designers, and researchers.[5] The site allows users to search images through description, tags, and sources in a variety of categories, ranging from Education to Business or Politics.[12] Users can publish infographics to their personal profile, which they can subsequently share through their social networks.[13]

Visual.ly maintains a team of data analysts, journalists, and designers that create infographics and data visualizations using the Visual.ly tools.[14][15][16] They are currently developing a tool that allows anyone to create and publish their own data visualizations.[15] Through this tool, users will be able to gather information from databases and APIs in an automated service (meaning that users only need to specify the kind of information they want to visually display) to produce an infographic.[9] Visual.ly’s first tool, the Twitter Visualizer tool allows users to input the Twitter handles of two people, and then generates an infographic comparing the hobbies, number of followers and occupation of the two accounts.[17][18] CBC used this feature to compare leading politicians.[19]

Reception[edit]

Visual.ly’s infographics have been featured on NPR, The Huffington Post and CNN.[20][21][22] They were named as one of Inc. Magazine’s 10 new web tools to make life easier.[23] Their YouTube channel has received over 100,000 views.[24]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d Tsotsis, Alexia. Visual.ly Raises $2 Million To Make Even More Infographics. October 20, 2011.
  2. ^ Team. Visual.ly.
  3. ^ Our Best Financial Infographics of 2009. MintLife. December 22, 2009.
  4. ^ Rufus, Anneli. Stew Langille: Infograph Guru. AskMen. July 28, 2011.
  5. ^ a b O’Dell. Jolie. Find & Make Your Own Infographics With Visual.ly. Mashable. July 13, 2011.
  6. ^ Tsotsis, Alexia. The Seven Most Interesting Startups At 500 Startups Demo Day (TCTV). TechCrunch. April 8, 2011.
  7. ^ Yarow, Jay. The Data Viz Whizzes From Mint Are Launching A New Startup, Visual.ly. Business Insider. April 6, 2012.
  8. ^ Kuang, Cliff. Visual.ly Wants To Make It Easy to Hire Infographic Genius. Fast Company.
  9. ^ a b Cheredar, Tom. Visual.ly raises $2M to make your data pretty and interesting. VentureBeat. October 20, 2011.
  10. ^ Merino, Faith. Infographics platform Visual.ly raises $2M. VatorNews. October 20, 2011.
  11. ^ Partners. Visual.ly.
  12. ^ Finn, Greg. Data Visualization & Infographic Search Engine Visual.ly Launches. Search Engine Land. July 13, 2011.
  13. ^ Dawson, Brianne. Visual.ly: Infographics Explain B2B Marketing Concepts. Business 2 Community. October 20, 2011.
  14. ^ Ha, Anthony and Matthew Lynley. The coolest companies from Dave McClure's 500 Startups. Venture Beat. April 6, 2011.
  15. ^ a b Zitron, Ed. The Media's Future is Visual.ly Charged. Forbes. April 26, 2011.
  16. ^ Gannes, Liz. visual.ly Wants to Bring Nifty Charts and Graphs to the Rest of Us. All Things D. July 13, 2011.
  17. ^ Henry, Alan. Visual.ly Is An Infographics Hub With Tools to Create Your Own. Lifehacker. July 14, 2011.
  18. ^ Chima, Chikodi. How infographics jumped the shark. December 1, 2011.
  19. ^ How do the political leaders compare on Twitter?. CBC. November 19, 2011.
  20. ^ Krulwich, Robert. Are You Totally Improbable Or Totally Inevitable? NPR. November 21, 2011.
  21. ^ U.S. Unemployment: Putting Jobs, Layoffs Into Perspective GRAPHIC. The Huffington Post. August 9, 2011.
  22. ^ Where the Jobs Are. CNN.
  23. ^ Brandon, John. 10 New Web Tools to Make Life Easier. Inc. November 9, 2011.
  24. ^ Visual.ly on YouTube.

External links[edit]