Vitalogy Tour

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Vitalogy Tour
Tour by Pearl Jam
Associated album Vitalogy
Start date February 18, 1995
End date November 7, 1995
Legs 3
Shows 17 in United States
12 in Oceania
7 in Asia
36 in total
Pearl Jam concert chronology
Vs. Tour
(1993-1994)
Vitalogy Tour
(1995)
No Code Tour
(1996)

The Vitalogy Tour was a concert tour by the American rock band Pearl Jam to support its third album, Vitalogy.

History[edit]

Pearl Jam promoted Vitalogy with tours in Asia, Oceania, and the United States in 1995. The band was joined by new drummer Jack Irons. The short tour of the United States focused on the Midwest and the West Coast. The band continued its boycott against Ticketmaster during its tour of the United States, refusing to play in Ticketmaster's venue areas, but was surprised that virtually no other bands joined it in refusing to play at Ticketmaster venues.[1] The band chose to use alternate ticketing companies for the shows.

The tour of the United States faced various troubles. Bassist Jeff Ament said that the band and its crew had to "[build] shows from the ground up, a venue everywhere we went."[2] In June 1995, the band was scheduled to play at San Francisco, California's Golden Gate Park in front of 50,000 people. Before the concert vocalist Eddie Vedder was forced to stay at a hospital after suffering from the effects of food poisoning. Vedder left the hospital to play the show, however he was not able to finish and ended up performing just seven out of twenty-one songs with the band.[3] Neil Young filled in for Vedder for the rest of the show that day. Vedder said, "That whole [Golden Gate Park] thing was a blur based on some bad food. It was really, really bad. Looking back at it, it doesn't seem as intense as it was, but it was horrible. I just felt not human and looking back I should have got through that show somehow, and I think the fact that Neil [Young] was there made me feel like I could get off the hook in some way and I did go out for a few songs."[2] Because of Vedder's health the band was forced to cancel the remaining dates of its tour of the United States.[4] The Milwaukee, Wisconsin dates at the Marcus Amphitheater and the Chicago, Illinois date at Soldier Field were eventually reinstated and the rest of the dates were rescheduled for the fall.

About cancelling the dates, Vedder said, "I think we all agreed that it had gotten insane, that it was no longer about the music."[5] Ament later said, "We were so hardheaded about the 1995 tour. Had to prove we could tour on our own, and it pretty much killed us, killed our career."[2] A concert video of the Australian tour was planned,[6] but later scrapped.

A professionally shot and edited video bootleg of the Pacific Leg tour has been circulating among fans for years, but was never officially released. Several scenes from this video can be seen in Pearl Jam Twenty, which was released in 2011.

Tour dates[edit]

Information taken from various sources.[7][8][9][10]

Warm-Up Shows[edit]

Date Location Venue Opening act
February 5, 1995 Seattle, Washington Moore Theatre
February 6, 1995 Magnog
February 8, 1995 Missoula, Montana Adams Fieldhouse, University of Montana-Missoula Shangri-La Speedway

Pacific Leg[edit]

Date Location Venue Opening acts Notes
February 18, 1995 Sendai, Japan Izumity 21
February 20, 1995 Tokyo, Japan Budokan
February 21, 1995 Osaka, Japan Kosei Nenkin Kaikan
February 22, 1995 Kobe, Japan Kokusai Kaikan Cancelled
February 24, 1995 Taipei, Taiwan TICC Mudhoney
February 26, 1995 Pasay, Philippines Folk Arts Theater
February 28, 1995 Bangkok, Thailand Huamark Indoor Stadium
March 3, 1995 Singapore, Singapore The Indoor Stadium
March 6, 1995 Perth, Australia Perth Entertainment Centre The Meanies
March 8, 1995 Adelaide, Australia Memorial Drive Tennis Centre
March 10, 1995 Sydney, Australia Sydney Entertainment Centre
March 11, 1995 Eastern Creek Raceway
March 14, 1995 Canberra, Australia Exhibition Park The Meanies, Cosmic Psychos
March 16, 1995 Melbourne, Australia Flinders Park Tennis Centre The Meanies
March 17, 1995
March 18, 1995 Sidney Myer Music Bowl
March 21, 1995 Brisbane, Australia Brisbane Entertainment Centre
March 22, 1995
March 24, 1995 Auckland, New Zealand Mt. Smart Super Top The Dead Flowers
March 25, 1995

United States Leg 1[edit]

Date Location Venue Opening acts Notes
June 16, 1995 Casper, Wyoming Casper Events Center Scollywags, Bad Religion Previously scheduled for the University Pavilion, Boise State University.
June 17, 1995 Salt Lake City, Utah Wolf Mountain Amphitheater Bad Religion Cancelled
June 19, 1995 Morrison, Colorado Red Rocks Amphitheatre
June 20, 1995
June 22, 1995 Sacramento, California Cal Expo Amphitheater Previously scheduled for Lake Tahoe's Boreal Ridge Ski Resort.
June 24, 1995 San Francisco, California Golden Gate Park Bad Religion, Crash and Brittany
June 26, 1995 San Diego, California Del Mar Fairgrounds Bad Religion Cancelled
June 27, 1995
June 29, 1995 Phoenix, Arizona Veterans Memorial Coliseum
June 30, 1995 Las Cruces, New Mexico Pan American Center
July 2, 1995 Austin, Texas South Park Meadows
July 4, 1995 New Orleans, Louisiana Tad Gormley Stadium
July 8, 1995 Milwaukee, Wisconsin Summerfest, Marcus Amphitheater Bad Religion, The Frogs
July 9, 1995
July 11, 1995 Chicago, Illinois Soldier Field Bad Religion, Otis Rush

United States Leg 2[edit]

Date Location Venue Opening acts
September 13, 1995 Phoenix, Arizona Veterans Memorial Coliseum Ramones
September 14, 1995 Las Cruces, New Mexico Pan American Center
September 16, 1995 Austin, Texas South Park Meadows
September 17, 1995 New Orleans, Louisiana Tad Gormley Stadium
November 1, 1995 Salt Lake City, Utah Delta Center Fastbacks
November 2, 1995
November 4, 1995 San Jose, California Spartan Stadium Fastbacks, Ben Harper
November 6, 1995 San Diego, California San Diego Sports Arena Ramones
November 7, 1995

Band members[edit]

Songs performed[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ DeRogatis, Jim. Milk It!: Collected Musings on the Alternative Music Explosion of the 90's. Cambridge: Da Capo, 2003. ISBN 0-306-81271-1, pg. 64
  2. ^ a b c Weisbard, Eric, et al. "Ten Past Ten". Spin. August 2001.
  3. ^ "1995 Concert Chronology". fivehorizons.com.
  4. ^ Hilburn, Robert. "Working Their Way Out of a Jam". Los Angeles Times. December 22, 1996.
  5. ^ Marks, Craig. "The Road Less Traveled". Spin. February 1997.
  6. ^ "Pearl Jam Rumor Pit: Issue #9". sonymusic.com. August 1, 1995.
  7. ^ "Pearl Jam: Set Lists". Pearljam.com. Retrieved 2007-12-08. 
  8. ^ "The Five Horizons Concert Chronology". fivehorizons.com. Retrieved 2007-12-08. 
  9. ^ "The Pearl Jam Concert Chronology". twofeetthick.com. Retrieved 2007-12-08. 
  10. ^ "Set Lists and Shows of 1995". sonymusic.com. Retrieved 2007-12-08.