Vivian Bose

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Justice Vivian Bose (also rendered V. V. N. Bose) (June 9, 1891 - November 29, 1983) Judge of the Supreme Court of India, served as the National Commissioner of the Bharat Scouts and Guides from November 1957 to November 1959.

Scouting for native Indians was started by Justice Bose, Pandit Madan Mohan Malaviya, Pandit Hridayanath Kunzru, Annie Besant and George Arundale, in 1913.

Justice Bose was a member of the World Scout Committee of the World Organization of the Scout Movement from 1947 until 1949.

He was also the President of the International Commission of Jurists. Justice Bose is known for breaking new ground in law, the significance of which came to be realized in later years.[1]

Lawyers occupy a specially privileged position in society and that thrusts great responsibilities on us (lawyers); at the same time it gives us immense opportunities to mould the life and thought of the Nation, not so much by talk though we can also be great talkers, beaten only by another class politicians and ministers, but by our life and example, by what we do in the courts of course, but also in spheres outside the range of bread and butter life.

[2]

The landmark judgement by Vivian Bose J in Virsa Singh v State of Punjab has set an important judicial precedent regarding the applicability of section 300 Thirdly of The Indian Penal Code of 1860.

He was married to Canadian Irene Mott, the author of The Monkey Tree on December 18, 1930. [3] [4]

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Preceded by
Dr. Hridyanath Kunzru
National Commissioners of the Bharat Scouts and Guides
1957–1959
Succeeded by
Professor Madan Mohan