Vladimir Anić

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Vladimir Anić (21 November 1930 – 30 November 2000) was a Croatian linguist and lexicographer. He is best known as the author of Rječnik hrvatskoga jezika (1991), the first modern single-volume dictionary of Croatian language.

Anić was born in Užice, Serbia.[1] He received a B.A. degree in Yugoslav languages and literature and Russian language and literature at the Faculty of Philosophy in Zagreb in 1956.[2] In 1963 he obtained a Ph.D. with the thesis Language of Ante Kovačić.[2] He taught at the Faculty of Philosophy in Zadar from 1960 to 1974, when he moved to the Faculty of Philosophy in Zagreb, becoming a full professor and head of the Department of Croatian standard language in 1976.[2]

Anić published more than two hundred papers, studies, reviews and assays in subject areas of syntax, phonology, accentuation, morphology, lexicography, lexicology, terminology and stylistics. He taught at universities in Germany, Sweden and Slovenia.

Anić's Dictionary of Croatian language

Vladimir Anić's most important and most widely known work is his dictionary of Croatian language. Started in 1972 and finally published in December 1991,[3] it appeared 90 years after the last comparable dictionary by Ivan Broz and Franjo Iveković was published in 1901. Two more significantly expanded and revised editions followed in 1994 and 1998,[4] while the fourth edition, complete with a CD-ROM version,[5] was published posthumously in 2003.[6]

His two other major works are Pravopisni priručnik hrvatskoga jezika (first published as Pravopisni priručnik hrvatskoga ili srpskoga jezika in 1986), an orthographic manual coauthored with Josip Silić,[2] and Rječnik stranih riječi (1999), a dictionary of loanwords in Croatian language, coauthored with Ivo Goldstein.

As a linguist, Vladimir Anić was a staunch descriptivist; he saw his dictionary as "not a book of best words, but a book of all words", and stressed the need for language creativity and freedom[7] as a counterweight against purism.[8]

He died in Zagreb.[1]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Anić, Vladimir", Croatian Encyclopedia (in Croatian), Leksikografski zavod Miroslav Krleža, 1999–2009, retrieved January 1, 2014 
  2. ^ a b c d "Vladimir Anić 1930. – 2000" (in Croatian). Archived from the original on 2 September 2012. Retrieved 2 September 2012. 
  3. ^ Kordić, Snježana (9 December 1991). "Recenzija knjige Vladimira Anića, Rječnik hrvatskoga jezika" [Review of Vladimir Anić’s Croatian Dictionary] (in Croatian). Zagreb: Vjesnik. p. 9. 
  4. ^ Kordić, Snježana (1998). "Tragom uspjeha jednog rječnika: recenzija 3. izdanja knjige Vladimira Anića, Rječnik hrvatskoga jezika" [Tracking the success of a dictionary: Review of the 3rd edition of Vladimir Anić’s Croatian Dictionary]. Kolo (in Croatian) 8 (3): 490–492. ISSN 1331-0992. 
  5. ^ Jovanović, Neven (17 June 2004). "Mi bismo još!: Recenzija knjige Vladimira Anića, Veliki rječnik hrvatskoga jezika" [We want more!: Review of Vladimir Anić’s Big Croatian Dictionary] (in Croatian). Zagreb: Zarez. Archived from the original on 2 September 2012. Retrieved 2 September 2012. 
  6. ^ Anić, Vladimir (2003) [1st pub. 1991]. Veliki rječnik hrvatskoga jezika (4. izdanje) [Big Croatian Dictionary (4th edition)]. Zagreb: Novi Liber. p. 1881. ISBN 953-6045-24-9. 
  7. ^ Kordić, Snježana (1999). "Protiv nasilja nad jezikom: recenzija knjige Vladimira Anića, Jezik i sloboda" [Against violence towards language: Review of Vladimir Anić’s Language and liberty]. Republika (in Croatian) 55 (5-6): 246–251. ISSN 0350-1337. Archived from the original on 2 September 2012. Retrieved 2 September 2012. 
  8. ^ Jergović, Miljenko (4 March 2000). "Govorite li idiotski?: razgovor s Vladimirom Anićem" [Do you speak idiotic?: Interview with Vladimir Anić] (in Croatian). Feral Tribune. Archived from the original on 2 September 2012. Retrieved 2 September 2012. 

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