Vogt Lo-100

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Lo-100
Lo100d0546.JPG
D-0546 Bitburg Airfield 2007
Role Aerobatic sailplane
National origin Germany
Manufacturer Homebuilt
Designer Alfred Vogt
First flight 1952
Number built ca. 45
Variants Vogt Lo-150

The Lo-100 is an aerobatic glider of classic wood and fabric construction well suited to amateur building methods. The designation Lo was bestowed by the designer Alfred Vogt in memory of his brother Lothar Vogt, with whom he had developed the predecessor model Lo-105 Zwergreiher ('dwarf heron'). The first flight of the prototype took place in 1952 at the Klippeneck.

The single-piece wing has a main spar built from laminated beechwood in order to achieve the strength needed for aerobatics. The glider has no spoilers and must be landed using side-slip.

Specifications[edit]

Data from The World's Sailplanes:Die Segelflugzeuge der Welt:Les Planeurs du Monde[1]

General characteristics

  • Crew: 1
  • Length: 6.15 m (20 ft 2 in)
  • Wingspan: 10 m (32 ft 10 in)
  • Wing area: 10.9 m2 (117 sq ft)
  • Aspect ratio: 9.2
  • Airfoil: Clark Y
  • Empty weight: 150 kg (331 lb)
  • Max takeoff weight: 265 kg (584 lb) normal flight
245 kg (540.1 lb) aerobatic flight

Performance

290 km/h (180.2 mph; 156.6 kn) aerobatic flight
  • Rough air speed max: 150 km/h (93.2 mph; 81.0 kn) normal flight
225 km/h (139.8 mph; 121.5 kn) aerobatic flight
  • Aerotow speed: 150 km/h (93.2 mph; 81.0 kn) normal flight
225 km/h (139.8 mph; 121.5 kn) aerobatic flight
  • Winch launch max speed: 125 km/h (77.7 mph; 67.5 kn) normal flight
140 km/h (87.0 mph; 75.6 kn) aerobatic flight
  • Rate of sink: 0.8 m/s (160 ft/min) at 72 km/h (44.7 mph; 38.9 kn)
  • Lift-to-drag: 25 at 85 km/h (52.8 mph; 45.9 kn)
  • Wing loading: 24.3 kg/m2 (5.0 lb/sq ft) normal flight
24.3 kg/m² (4.98 lb/sq ft) aerobatic flight

See also[edit]

Related development

Vogt Lo 150

Aircraft of comparable role, configuration and era

Vogt Lo 105

Related lists

List of gliders

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Shenstone, B.S.; K.G. Wilkinson (1958). The World's Sailplanes:Die Segelflugzeuge der Welt:Les Planeurs du Monde (in Primarily English with French and German) (1st ed.). Zurich: Organisation Scientifique et Technique Internationale du Vol a Voile (OSTIV) and Schweizer Aero-Revue. pp. 68–72. 

References[edit]

  • Shenstone, B.S.; K.G. Wilkinson (1958). The World's Sailplanes:Die Segelflugzeuge der Welt:Les Planeurs du Monde (in Primarily English with French and German) (1st ed.). Zurich: Organisation Scientifique et Technique Internationale du Vol a Voile (OSTIV) and Schweizer Aero-Revue. pp. 68–72. 

Further reading[edit]

  • Dietmar Geistmann, Die Segelflugzeuge in Deutschland, ISBN 3-87943-618-5
  • Georg Brütting, Die berühmtesten Segelflugzeuge, ISBN 3-613-02296-6
  • Martin Simons, Sailplanes, Vol. 2 1945-1965, EQIP
  • Peter Mallinson und Mike Woollard, Handbook of Glider Aerobatics
  • Eric Müller, Upside Down Faszination und Technik des Kunstflugs, ISBN 3-517-01212-2

External links[edit]