Voiced uvular stop

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search

Voiced uvular stop[edit]

Voiced uvular stop
ɢ
IPA number 112
Encoding
Entity (decimal) ɢ
Unicode (hex) U+0262
X-SAMPA G\
Kirshenbaum G
Braille ⠔ (braille pattern dots-35) ⠛ (braille pattern dots-1245)
Sound

The voiced uvular stop or voiced uvular plosive is a type of consonantal sound, used in some spoken languages. The symbol in the International Phonetic Alphabet that represents this sound is ɢ, and the equivalent X-SAMPA symbol is G\.

[ɢ] is a rare sound, even compared to other uvulars. See voiced velar stop for a possible reason.

Features[edit]

Features of the voiced uvular stop:

  • Its manner of articulation is occlusive, which means it is produced by obstructing airflow in the vocal tract. Since the consonant is also oral, with no nasal outlet, the airflow is blocked entirely, and the consonant is a stop.
  • Its place of articulation is uvular, which means it is articulated with the back of the tongue (the dorsum) at the uvula.
  • Its phonation is voiced, which means the vocal cords vibrate during the articulation. However, in some languages (like Swiss German) it can just mean that this consonant is pronounced shorter and weaker than its voiceless counterpart, while its voicedness or lack thereof is not relevant. In such cases it's more accurate to call such sounds lenis or lax.
  • It is an oral consonant, which means air is allowed to escape through the mouth only.

Occurrence[edit]

Language Word IPA Meaning Notes
Arabic Yemeni[1] قات About this sound [ɢɑːt]  'Khat' Some dialects.[1] Corresponds to /q/ in Standard Arabic. See Arabic phonology
French
[citation needed]
Some speakers Grotte [ɢʁɔt] 'cave' Allophone of /ɡ/ before /ʁ/ for some speakers
Inuktitut ᐃᐦᐃᑉᕆᐅᖅᑐᖅ [ihipɢiuqtuq] 'explore' See Inuit phonology
Kwak'wala ǥilakas'la [ɢilakasʔla] 'welcome/thank you'
Mongolian Монгол [mɔŋɢɔ̆ɮ] 'Mongolian'
Persian غذا About this sound [ɢæˈzɒː]  'food' See Persian phonology
Somali Muqdisho [muɢdiʃɔ] 'Mogadishu' Allophone of /q/. See Somali phonology
Tabasaran дугу [d̪uɢu] 'he (ergative)'
Tlingit ǥooch [ɢuːtʃ] 'wolf'
Tsakhur ? [ɢajɛ] 'stone'
!Xóõ ? [nǀɢɑɑ̃] 'to be spread out'

Voiced post-velar stop[edit]

Voiced post-velar stop
ɡ̄
ɢ̟

The voiced post-velar stop or voiced post-velar plosive is a consonant occurring in Australian English. It's equally valid to use the term pre-uvular instead of post-velar, since they're essentially equivalent.

Features[edit]

Features of the voiceless post-velar stop:

  • Its manner of articulation is occlusive, which means it is produced by obstructing airflow in the vocal tract. Since the consonant is also oral, with no nasal outlet, the airflow is blocked entirely, and the consonant is a stop.
  • Its place of articulation is post-velar, which means it is articulated with the back of the tongue raised between the soft palate and the uvula.
  • Its phonation is voiced, which means the vocal cords vibrate during the articulation. However, in some languages (like Swiss German) it can just mean that this consonant is pronounced shorter and weaker than its voiceless counterpart, while its voicedness or lack thereof is not relevant. In such cases it's more accurate to call such sounds lenis or lax.
  • It is an oral consonant, which means air is allowed to escape through the mouth only.

Occurrence[edit]

Language Word IPA Meaning Notes
English Australian[2] gaudy [ˈɡ̄oːdɪi̯] 'gaudy' Allophone of /g/ before /ʊ oː ɔ oɪ ʊə/.[2] See Australian English phonology
Yanyuwa[3] [ɡ̄uɟ̠uɭu] 'sacred' Contrasts plain and prenasalized versions

See also[edit]

References[edit]

Bibliography[edit]