Volcán Bárcena

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Barcena
Bárcena tuff cone.jpg
Barcena cinder cone
Elevation 332 m (1,089 ft)
Listing List of volcanoes in Mexico
Location
Barcena is located in Mexico
Barcena
Barcena
San Benedicto Island,  Mexico
Coordinates 19°18′29″N 110°48′24″W / 19.30806°N 110.80667°W / 19.30806; -110.80667Coordinates: 19°18′29″N 110°48′24″W / 19.30806°N 110.80667°W / 19.30806; -110.80667
Geology
Type Cinder cone
Volcanic arc/belt Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt
Last eruption 1952 to 1953

The Bárcena volcano is classified as a dormant, or historical, cinder cone type volcano that encompasses the southern end of the San Benedicto Island, Mexico.[1] It is grouped with a chain of volcanic islands known as the Revillagigedo Islands, Mexico. These islands are situated in close proximity to each other, and can be found in the Pacific ocean. They are also considered to be part of the Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt. Volcán Bárcena is positioned 220 miles (353.98 kilometers) off the south-eastern coast of the Baja peninsula.[2] The closest city to Barcena is Cabo San Lucas, Mexico.[3]

Eruption/Creation[edit]

The Volcan Barcena was created by a series of eruptions that started on 1 August 1952. The first eruption took place in the early morning, and was rated at a 3.0 on the volcanic scale.[4] This eruption spewed immense amounts of ash and rock. The eruption is responsible for the formation of the base of the volcano and the overall extension of the island, the second eruption is responsible for the formation of a large crater inside of the volcanic cone, and the third has been widely accepted as the cause of lava discharge throughout the island.[5] The series of eruptions that created the volcano came to an end less than seven months later.[6] At its peak, the Barcena Volcano reaches an astounding height of 1090 feet (332 meters).[7]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Global Volcanism Program | Bárcena | Summary." Smithsonian Institution - Global Volcanism Program: Worldwide Holocene Volcano and Eruption Information. Web. 18 Feb. 2011. <http://www.volcano.si.edu/world/volcano.cfm?vnum=1401-02=>.
  2. ^ Speck, Susan. "Socorro Islands." ScubaWizard.com - The Most Comprehensive Scuba Diving Site Around. 2 May 2007. Web. 18 Feb. 2011. <http://www.scubawizard.com/articles/articles/3/1/Socorro-Islands/Page1.html>.
  3. ^ Virtual Mexico. "Baja California Mexico including La Paz, Ensenada, Los Cabos, San Felipe, Loreto, Mulege." Virtual Mexico: Maps, Mexico Travel, Mexican Art, Crafts, Hotels. Web. 18 Feb. 2011. <http://www.virtualmex.com/baja.htm>.
  4. ^ Caine, Fraser. "Barcena Volcano." Universe Today. 5 June 2009. Web. 18 Feb. 2011. <http://www.universetoday.com/32083/barcena-volcano/>.
  5. ^ Search, John. "Bárcena Volcano, Mexico - John Seach." Volcano Live, John Seach. Web. 16 Feb. 2011. <http://www.volcanolive.com/barcena.html>.
  6. ^ "Global Volcanism Program | Bárcena | Eruptive History." Smithsonian Institution - Global Volcanism Program: Worldwide Holocene Volcano and Eruption Information. Web. 18 Feb. 2011. <http://www.volcano.si.edu/world/volcano.cfm?vnum=1401-02=&volpage=erupt>.
  7. ^ Volcanodb. "Barcena." Volcanoes - Volcanoes Statistics - Volcano Eruptions. 2007. Web. 18 Feb. 2011. <http://www.volcanodb.com/volcano/1103/Barcena>.