Voter fatigue

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In politics, voter fatigue is the apathy that the electorate can experience under certain circumstances, one of which could be (in exceptional circumstances) that they are required to vote too often, or that they feel disengaged. Voter fatigue and voter apathy should be distinguished from what arises when voters are not allowed or unable to vote, or when disenfranchisement occurs.

Voter fatigue can be used as a criticism of the direct democracy system, in those specific situations in which voters are constantly asked to decide on policy via referenda (though it should be borne in mind that such situations may be practically rare). However, proponents often counter that voter fatigue may be lessened by direct democracy as voters will feel their vote has more effect.

Voter fatigue can cause notoriously low voter turnout rates, and potentially more protest vote, and supposedly occurs for a variety of reasons:

  • voters are not interested in the issue.
  • voters are bothered by the inconvenience of physically voting.
  • voters feel their vote will not count / the election has "already been won" by one side.
  • voters feel that it is not worth their while to educate themselves as to the issues and hence their vote would not be worth making. This is related to the concept of rational ignorance.
  • voters have to vote for too many institutions (too often).

Amongst the methods that can be used to combat voter fatigue are:

See also[edit]

  • Donor fatigue, increased apathy about giving to charitable or humanitarian causes