Voter turnout in the United States presidential elections

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The following is a listing of voter turnout in each United States presidential election going back to 1828.

Graph of voter turnout percentage from 1824 to 2008.
Voter turnout by sex and age for the 2008 US Presidential Election.
Voter turnout in the 2008 U.S. Presidential Election by race/ethnicity.
Different rates of voting in the 2008 U.S. Presidential Election by income
Different rates in voting in the 2008 U.S. Presidential Election by educational attainment
Election Voting Age Population (VAP)
(thousands)[1]
Turnout
(thousands)[1]
 % Turnout of VAP[1][2]
1789
1792
1796
1800
1804
1808
1812
1816
1820
1824
1828 57.6%
1832 55.4%
1836 57.8%
1840 80.2%
1844 78.9%
1848 72.7%
1852 69.6%
1856 78.9%
1860 81.2%
1864 73.8%
1868 78.1%
1872 71.3%
1876 81.8%
1880 79.4%
1884 77.5%
1888 79.3%
1892 74.7%
1896 79.3%
1900 73.2%
1904 65.2%
1908 65.4%
1912 58.8%
1916 61.6%
1920 49.2%
1924 48.9%
1928 56.9%
1932 75,768 39,817 52.6%
1936 80,174 45,647 56.9%
1940 84,728 49,815 58.8%
1944 85,654 48,026 56.1%
1948 95,573 48,834 51.1%
1952 99,929 61,552 61.6%
1956 104,515 62,027 59.3%
1960 109,672 68,836 62.8%
1964 114,090 70,098 61.4%
1968 120,285 73,027 60.7%
1972 140,777 77,625 55.1%
1976 152,308 81,603 53.6%
1980 163,945 86,497 52.8%
1984 173,995 92,655 53.3%
1988 181,956 91,587 50.3%
1992 189,493 104,600 55.2%
1996 196,789 96,390 49.0%
2000 209,787 105,594 50.3%
2004 219,553 122,349 55.7%
2008 229,945 131,407 57.1%
2012 235,248 129,235 54.9%

Note: While final exact figures for 2012 are yet to be calculated, the Bipartisan Research Center has stated that turnout for 2012 was 57.5 percent of the eligible voters, which they claim was a decline from 2008. They estimate that as a percent of eligible voters, turn out was: 2000, 54.2%; in 2004 60.4%; 2008 62.3%; and 2012 57.5%.[3] These were the same figures as given by the Center for the Study of the American Electorate.[4]

Later analysis by the University of South Carolina Beaufort's American Presidency Project found that there were 235,248,000 people of voting age in the United States in the 2012 election, resulting in 2012 voting age population (VAP) turnout of 54.9%.[5] The total increase in VAP between 2008 and 2012 (5,300,000) was the smallest increase since 1964, bucking the modern average of 9,000,000-13,000,000 per cycle. One possible reason for this relates to the effects that the Great Recession and stricter border control mechanisms had on net migration to the United States from Mexico from 2009 to 2012; net migration from Mexico to the United States plummeted to zero (and potentially net-negative totals) during this time, and for the first time in more than 80 years, the Mexican-born population in the United States decreased.[6] Since the broadest measurement of VAP takes into account all adults who are living in the United States regardless of voter registration or citizenship status, such abnormally large reductions in immigration during this period would affect the overall number.

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c Between 1932 and 2008: "Table 397. Participation in Elections for President and U.S. Representatives: 1932 to 2010". U.S. Census Bureau, Statistical Abstract of the United States: 2012. U.S. Census Bureau. 
  2. ^ Between 1828-1928: "Voter Turnout in Presidential Elections: 1828 - 2008". The American Presidency Project. UC Santa Barbara. Retrieved 2012-11-09. 
  3. ^ Bipartisan Research Center, "2012 Voter Turnout," November 8, 2012. http://bipartisanpolicy.org/library/report/2012-voter-turnout
  4. ^ "Election results 2012: Report reveals 2012 voter turnout was lower than 2008 and 2004" Chanel 5 report. November 15, 2012. wptv.com.
  5. ^ University of South Carolina Beaufort (American Presidency Project), "Voter Turnout in Presidential Elections", May 4, 2013. http://www.presidency.ucsb.edu/data/turnout.php
  6. ^ Pew Hispanic Trends Project, "Net Migration from Mexico Falls to Zero—and Perhaps Less", April 23, 2012. http://www.pewhispanic.org/2012/04/23/net-migration-from-mexico-falls-to-zero-and-perhaps-less/