Vuélveme a Querer (song)

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"Vuélveme a Querer"
Single by Cristian Castro
from the album Boleros: Por Amor y Desamor
Released 1995
Format Promo single
Recorded 1995
Genre Latin pop
Length 4:09
Label Melody, Fonovisa
Writer(s) Jorge Avendaño Lührs
Producer(s) Jorge Avendaño Lührs
Cristian Castro singles chronology
"Morelia"
(1995)
"Vuélveme a Querer"
(1995)
"Amor"
(1996)
Music sample
A 24 second sample of Vuélveme a Querer by Cristian Castro.

"Vuélveme a Querer" (English: "Love Me Again") is a song written and produced by Jorge Avendaño Lührs and performed by Mexican recording artist Cristian Castro for the compilation album Boleros: Por Amor y Desamor (1995). The song speaks of a protagonist who yearns for his lover to return. In the United States, the song peaked at number two on the Billboard Hot Latin Songs and number one on the Billboard Latin Pop Songs chart. It received a Billboard Latin Music Award and a Lo Nuestro nomination for Pop Song of the Year the following year. Lührs received an award in the Pop/Rock category at the American Society of Composers, Authors and Publishers (ASCAP) Awards of 1997

Background and lyrics[edit]

Boleros Por Amor y Desamor is a compilation album released by Fonovisa in 1995, which features various artists performing boleros written and produced by Mexican songwriter Jorge Avendaño Lührs.[1] Mexican singer-songwriter Cristian Castro was among the selected artists to record a song for the album. Lührs had previously composed the song "Morelia" for Castro for the telenovela of the same name.[2] In the song, the protagonist whot yearnss his lover to return.[3] In 2012, Castro re-recorded the song for his first live album En Primera Fila: Día 1 which released in 2013.[4] The new version was recorded live in Los Angeles, California which arranged by Matt Rolling and produced Aureo Baqueiro.[5]

Reception[edit]

"Vuélveme a Querer" debuted at number fifteen on the Billboard Hot Latin Songs chart chart for the week of September 9, 1995.[6] The song climbed to the top ten on the week of September 30, 1995 and peaked at number two nine weeks later with the number-one spot being held by Enrique Iglesias's song "Si Tú Te Vas".[7][8] The song debuted on the Billboard Latin Pop Songs chart at number thirteen.[9] It reached number-one on the chart on the week of September 23, 1995 replacing "La Tierra del Olvido" by Carlos Vives and was succeeded by Gloria Estefan's song "Más Allá" fourteen weeks later.[10] The song reached number two in Mexico City.[11]

In 1996, "Vuélveme a Querer" received a Billboard Latin Music Award for Pop Song of the Year.[12] It was also nominated for Pop Song of the Year at the 8th Lo Nuestro Awards which went to Enrique Iglesias for his song "Si Tú Te Vas".[13] Lührs was awarded at the 1997 American Society of Composers, Authors and Publishers in the Pop/Rock category for the song.[14]

Charts[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Boleros: Por Amor y Desamor — Credits". Allmusic. Rovi Corporation. Retrieved 2013-01-28. 
  2. ^ "Morelia — Cristian Castro". Allmusic. Rovi Corporation. Retrieved 2013-01-28. 
  3. ^ "Letra de Vuélveme a Querer - Cristian Castro" (in Spanish). Coveralia. Retrieved 2013-01-28. 
  4. ^ "En Primera Fila: Dia 1 — Cristian Castro: Overview". Allmusic. Rovi Corporation. Retrieved 2013-06-11. 
  5. ^ "Cristian Castro lanza disco en vivo: 'Primera Fila- Día 1'". The Huffington Post (in Spanish). AOL. 2013-02-04. Retrieved 2013-07-02. 
  6. ^ "Vuélveme a Querer — Week of September 16, 1995". Billboard. Prometheus Global Media. 1995-09-16. Retrieved 2013-06-11. 
  7. ^ "Vuélveme a Querer — Week of September 30, 1995". Billboard. Prometheus Global Media. 1995-09-30. 
  8. ^ "Si Tú Te Vas — Week of December 2, 1995". Billboard. Prometheus Global Media. 1995-12-02. 
  9. ^ "Vuélveme a Querer — Week of September 9, 1995". Billboard. Prometheus Global Media. 1995-09-09. Retrieved 2013-06-11. 
  10. ^ "Latin Pop Songs — Week of December 30, 1995". Billboard. Prometheus Global Media. 1995-12-30. 
  11. ^ "Discos populares en Latinoamérica". El Siglo de Torreón (in Spanish). 1995-12-09. p. 39. 
  12. ^ Lannert, John (1996-05-04). ¡Que Viva La Música! 108 (18). p. L-3. Retrieved 2013-06-11. 
  13. ^ "Univision Announces The Nominees For Spanish-Language Music's Highest Honors: Premio Lo Nuestro A La Musica Latina". PR Newswire. Free Online Library. 1996-03-27. Retrieved 2013-06-11. 
  14. ^ "ASCAP congratulates the winners of the fifth annual El Premio Ascap 1997". Billboard (Prometheus Global Media) 109: 16. 1997-09-20. Retrieved 2013-06-11. 
  15. ^ a b "Cristian Castro — Awards". Allmusic. Rovi Corporation. Retrieved 2013-06-11. 
  16. ^ "The Year in Music". Billboard (Prometheus Global Media) 108 (52): YE-64. 1996-12-28. Retrieved 2013-06-11.