Vusumzi Make

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Vusumzi L. Make (1931 – 15 April 2006)[1] was a South African civil rights activist and lawyer.[2] He and the American poet Maya Angelou met in 1961,[3][4] lived together in Cairo, Egypt, and parted ways in 1962.[3][5] He was a professor at the University of Liberia in Monrovia, Liberia from 1968 to 1974.[citation needed]

Time in the Pan Africanist Congress[edit]

When Potlako Leballo, Chairman of the Pan Africanist Congress, was forced out of the position, Make joined a Presidential Council consisting of David Sibeko, Ellias Ntloedibe, and himself. Several months later, Make became the sole Chairman.[6] He resigned from the chairmanship in January 1981 to make way for John Nyathi Pokela, who had been recently imprisoned on Robben Island. Under Pokela, Make served as deputy chairman of the PAC.[2]

Death[edit]

Make died on 15 April 2006 in Pretoria.[1] He was survived by his widow Alma Liziwe Make and daughter Titise.[citation needed]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Vus'umuzi Make". sahistory.org.za. South African History Online. Retrieved 2007-01-06. 
  2. ^ a b Kondlo, Kwandiwe Merriman (2004-01-01). "The generation of strained intra-PAC relations in exile 1962-1990". In the twilight of the Azanian Revolution: the exile history of the Pan Africanist Congress of Azania (South Africa): (1960-1990). University of Johannesburg. pp. Chapter 4, pp 146–246. Retrieved 2006-12-27. 
  3. ^ a b Gillespie, Marcia Ann; Butler, Rosa Johnson; Long, Richard A. (2008). Maya Angelou: A Glorious Celebration. New York: Random House. p. 59. ISBN 978-0-385-51108-7. 
  4. ^ "The Life and Times of Maya Angelou". Sir Francis Drake High School. Retrieved 2006-12-27. 
  5. ^ Mcgraw, Patricia Washington (2006-07-12). "Maya Angelou (1928–)". Encyclopedia of Arkansas. Central Arkansas Library System. Retrieved 2006-12-27. 
  6. ^ Kondlo, Kwandiwe Merriman (2004-01-01). 6. "From Poqo to APLA: The evolution of the PAC’s military strategy (1961-1990)". In the twilight of the Azanian Revolution: the exile history of the Pan Africanist Congress of Azania (South Africa): (1960-1990). University of Johannesburg. pp. 281–311. Retrieved 2006-12-27. 

External links[edit]

Preceded by
David Sibeko, Ellias Ntloedibe, and Make
Chairman of the Pan Africanist Congress
August 1979-January 1981
Succeeded by
John Nyathi Pokela