Vyadeshwar

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Shri Dev Vyadeshwar
Geography
Coordinates 17°28′N 73°12′E / 17.47°N 73.2°E / 17.47; 73.2Coordinates: 17°28′N 73°12′E / 17.47°N 73.2°E / 17.47; 73.2
Country India
State/province Maharashtra
District Ratnagiri

Shri Dev Vyadeshwar (देवनागरी: श्री देव व्याडेश्वर) is an ancient shiva temple[1] located at Guhagar,[2] a well known Taluka place in Ratnagiri District of Maharashtra State in India. It is considered to be the Kuladevata or clan god of many Chitpavan Families from Konkanregion.


Pindi of Shri Vyadweshwar

Audio file of Shri Vyadeshwar Aarti

Problems playing this file? See media help.

Story[edit]

According to Hindu myth, Bhagwan Parshurama reclaimed the land of Konkan[3] after donating the earth to Maharshi Kashyap. Then he requested different Gods and Goddesses to settle in the newly created land and to take responsibility of various clans. Parshuram, being a devotee of Shri Shiva, requested Bhagwan Shankar to give him 'Darshan' everyday, while he is living in the newly created land. Lord Shiva accepted his request.Lord Parshuram also brought 60 'Vipras' to settle in Kokan.One such Vipra named 'Vyad' installed a Shivlinga at Guhagar.
After 'Shriramavatar' and 'Shrikrushnavtar' Lord Vishnu came with his 'Kalki' manifestation. In this era, since evil thoughts are supposed to prevail, Gods are to remain in their invisible forms. Accordingly Lord Shiva decided to remain in invisible form in the Shivalinga installed by Vyad Muni. The same Shivalinga is this well known Vyadeshwar Thus, Lord Shiva stays at Guhagar in the 'Vyadeshwar' Shivalinga from years together. According to another myth, in the era of King Sakuran, the Vyadeshwar Shivalinga was re-invented and the Temple,[4] which we see today, was constructed.

Style of Construction[edit]

The temple style is called 'Panchayatan'. A Panchayatana temple has four subordinate shrines on four corners and the main shrine in the center of the podium, which comprises their base.[5] Here, the main shrine at the center is of Shri Vyadeshwar (Shri Shiva) and the other deities at the surrounding are: The Sun, Shri Ganesh, Shri Parvati and Shri Vishnu along with goddess Lakshmi at South-East, South-West, North-West and North-East respectively. Statue of Nandi(So called 'VEHICLE' of Shri Shiva) is installed in front of the main shrine.The plan of the temple[6] is shown in the adjacent photograph.

Plan of Shri Vyadeshwara Mahadeva temple.

There are Three entrances to the temple. One each from East, West and South side. After we enter from the East entrance, there are two statues of Garud and Maruti from inside of the temple.

Incarnations of Shri Vyadeshwar[edit]

It is said that once upon a time, three small pieces were chipped out from the main or Core part of the Pindi. One piece reached at Borya Adoor,[7] the second piece went to Asgoli and the third one reached Anjanwel.[8] So three Shiv Temples were erected at those locations. These temples are known as Talkeshwar, Balkeshwar (Valukeshwar)[9] and Udaleshwar (Uddalakeshwar)[10] respectively. Also these three Shiv Pindis are called as 'Incarnations of Shri Vyadeshwar'. The photographs are available in the gallery. It is said that the devotees of Shri Vyadeshwar should visit these three temples as well.

Other Holy places nearby[edit]

Various other holy places nearby are on account of the presence of different deities namely : Garamath, Velneshwar, Tarakeshwar, Taldeo, Kartikeya, Someshwar, Sapteshwar, Karneshwar, Karhateshwar, Kutakeshwar, Hrudakeshwar, Saptakotishwar, Dalbhyeshwar, Harihareshwar, Bhairav, Rameshwar, Chyavaneshwar, Urfata Ganesh, Durgadevi.

Holy Aarti[edit]

Aarti is a holy prayer in the name of a specific god. Aarti for Shri Vyadeshwar is shown in the last picture while the same can be listened using the above link.

Shri Vyadeshwar Mantra[edit]

In Sanskrit language, the holy prayer for chanting is called as Mantra. Following is the Vyadeshwar Mantra:[11] Shri Vyadeshwar Mantra

Gallery[edit]

Following are the relevant pictures.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

External links[edit]