Wāqwāq

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Wāqwāq
Waqwaq Vol01 Cover.jpg
Cover of the first Japanese volume of Wāqwāq, published by Shueisha on January 5, 2005
Genre Science fantasy
Manga
Written by Ryu Fujisaki
Published by Shueisha
English publisher
Demographic Shōnen
Magazine Weekly Shōnen Jump
Original run August 30, 2004May 9, 2005
Volumes 4
Portal icon Anime and Manga portal

Wāqwāq (Japanese: ワークワーク Hepburn: Wākuwāku?) is a Japanese manga series written and illustrated by Ryu Fujisaki. It was serialized in Shueisha's magazine Weekly Shōnen Jump from August 2004 to May 2005. The series individual chapters were collected into four tankōbon (collected volumes) and published from January to July 2005 by Shueisha. It was later licensed in Northern America by Viz Media for an English-language publication, which was released from August 2009 to May 2010. It has been re-published by Shueisha, distributed as digital media by Viz Media, and localized in other countries.

Wāqwāq is set a world where humans have black blood and fear belligerent creatures known as "machines", entrusting their salvation on the Guardians—humans who possess weapons that give them supernatural powers—, and on the red-blooded Kami. The series focuses on Shio, a Guardian who meets Matsuda, who is believed to be Kami, and starts a journey in which he faces other adversaries who wants Kami's power. Its art and story was initially said to be confusing by some critics, but others stated that these aspects get better as the manga progress. It was described as a typical shōnen, but its characters and action have received mostly praise.

Plot[edit]

Two millennia prior the series' events, the humans create black-blooded androids to accomplish tasks to facilitate their lives. However, these androids rebel against the humankind; to destroy the black-bloodeds, the red-blooded humans create the machines (機械 Kikai?). In the aftermath, the red-bloodeds are almost extinct, and the black-bloodeds hide themselves from the machines. Koto (コト?), a red-blooded, Yoki (ヨキ?), a black-blooded, Kiku (キク?), a machine—collectively known as the "The Three Magi" (参賢者 San Kenja?)—create the Gojin-zou (護神像 Gojinzō?) to gather the wishes of its wielders, the seven Guardians (防人 Sakimori?), who by fusing with the Gojin-zou gain supernatural powers to fight against the machines, whose wishes are also stored into the Gojin-zou when they are destroyed. By combining these wishes with the Kami's red blood, a machine known as "Spider's Thread" will guarantee any wish—the magi hope the wish that will be fulfilled is to return the world to how it was before the war.

The series focuses on Shio (シオ?), a 12-year-old boy, who becomes a Guardian after his village is attacked by machines that kill his father, Al (アル Aru?)—the former wielder of Armaiti (アールマティ Ārumati?), a Gojin-zou that chooses Shio to be its next user. Shio meets Matsuda (松田?), a red-blooded girl—bring from the past by the magi—whom is believed to be Kami. Shio and Matsuda—misled by Yoki—travel towards the Spider's Thread. On their way, Shio defeats several Guardians—the magi diffuse the ability the Kami's blood has to make the Guardians fight each other, aiming to fulfill the wish of the Guardian who overcome the others. Along the way, Shio befriends the robot Plasty (プラ Pura?), the Guardian Leonard Hediard (レオナルド・エディアール Reonarudo Ediāru?), and the wanabbe ninja Fran (フラン Furan?). When they arrive to Spider's Thread, Shio is killed by Yoki and Koto reveals his real intention is to kill all black-bloodeds. Resurrected by Matsuda's blood, Shio defeats Koto, and wishes the red-bloodeds no longer exist. Kiku explains to the machines to do not attack the humans, Wāqwāq becomes a peaceful place, and Matsuda returns to her world.

Release[edit]

Wāqwāq, written and illustrated by Ryu Fujisaki, was originally serialized in the magazine Weekly Shōnen Jump from August 30, 2004, to May 9, 2005.[1][2] Shueisha compiled its 34 chapters into four tankōbon (collected volumes) and released them from January 5, 2005 to July 4, 2005.[3][4] Later, on November 18, 2008, Shueisha started to re-release the series in a bunkoban edition, which spawned three volumes, with the last one being published on January 16, 2009.[5][6][7] At the 2008 Comic-Con, Viz Media announced that it had licensed Wāqwāq for an English-language translation in Northern America.[8] Viz Media published a preview of the first chapter on the August 2009 issue of its magazine Shonen Jump,[9] and the volumes from August 4, 2009 to May 4, 2010.[10][11] The series was also localized in Hong Kong by Culturecom,[12] and in Singapore by Chuang Yi.[13] A digital version of the volumes were also available by Viz Media which released them from June 25, 2013 to August 13, 2013.[10][11]

Volume list[edit]

No. Title Japanese release English release
1 Proof of the Gods
Tengoku to ha Kamisama no Owasu Koto Nari (天国とは神様のおわすことなり)
January 5, 2005[3]
ISBN 978-4-08-873766-9
August 4, 2009[10]
ISBN 978-1-4215-2738-3
  1. "Proof of the Gods" (天国とは神様のおわすことなり "Tengoku to ha Kamisama no Owasu Koto Nari"?)
  2. "Hatred" (憎悪 "Zōo"?)
  3. "Guardian Qaf and Gojin-zou Khshathra" (防人カーフと護神像クシャスラ "Sakimori Kāfu to Gojinzō Kushasura"?)
  1. "Migraine" (偏頭痛 "Henzutsū"?)
  2. "Kami's Reality and Shio's Faith" (神の現実と塩の信仰 "Kami no Utsutsu to Shio no Shinkō"?)
  3. "The Battle over Wishes" (願いをめぐる戦い "Negai o Meguru Tatakai"?)
  4. "Food" ( "Shoku"?)
Shio becomes a Guardian after the death of his father, Al, who dies protecting a girl and a village from the machines. Shio believes Matsuda—the aforementioned girl—is the red-blooded Kami who can save the humankid. A Guardian called Qaf tries to capture her; Qaf is prevented to do it by Yoki, a village's doctor. Shio and Matsuda leave the village and start to head to a village where is located the "Spider's Thread". On their way, they find a robot, which Matsuda names Plasty, and Shio engages in battle another Guardian, Leo. Both Guardians attack Matsuda because they are told by a man in shadow she is the Kami who can fulfill any wish trough her blood.
2 The Three Magi
San Kenja (参賢者)
March 4, 2005[14]
ISBN 978-4-08-873785-0
November 3, 2009[15]
ISBN 978-1-4215-2739-0
  1. "The Three Magi" (参賢者 "San Kenja"?)
  2. "Spirited Away" (神かくし "Kami Kakushi"?)
  3. "Guardian Drexel and Gojin-zou Ameretat I" (防人ドレクセルと護神像アムルタ-ト "Sakimori Dorekuseru to Gojinzō Amurutato"?)
  4. "Guardian Drexel and Gojin-zou Ameretat II" (防人ドレクセルと護神像アムルタ-トII "Sakimori Dorekuseru to Gojinzō Amurutato II"?)
  1. "Fury" (獅子奮迅 "Shishifunjin"?)
  2. "Flame" (ほのお "Honō"?)
  3. "Kami on an I.V." (点滴をする神 "Tenteki o Suru Kami"?)
  4. "Qaf Makes His Move" (カーフ始動 "Kāfu Shidō"?)
  5. "Hilarious Ninja Legend Zuranpo" (爆笑忍者伝説ズランポ "Bakushō Ninja Densetsu Zuranpo"?)
Shio defeats Leo, and Armaiti eats Leo's Gojin-zou, then he joins Shio and Matsuda, who heals Leo with her blood. Meanwhile, Yoki is revealed to be a magus, and the creator of Gojin-zou along with two other magi, Kiku and the man in shadow—Koto, the last red-blooded. They create the Gojin-zou to store the wishes of the Guardians and the machines. These wishes combined with the Kami's red blood will guarantee any wish—they intend to grant it to the survival Guardian. Matsuda is kidnapped by the magi. On her chase, Shio devours the Gojin-zou of Guardian Drexel, meets Fran, a wannabe ninja, and is engaged in battle by Guardian Nohl. Elsewhere, Qaf devours the Gojin-zou of Guardian Allan.
3 Vow of the Rose
Amusha Spunta-tachi (不滅なる利益者達)
May 2, 2005[16]
ISBN 978-4-08-873811-6
February 2, 2010[17]
ISBN 978-1-4215-2740-6
  1. "Vow of the Rose" (薔薇の誓い "Bara no Chikai"?)
  2. "Drifting Petals" (華の散るらむ "Hana no Chiruramu"?)
  3. "Al Idrisi's Shadow" (アル・イドリーシの影 "Aru Idorīshi no Kage"?)
  4. "The Last Guardians—Shio and Leo" (塩と獅子~最後の防人 "Shio to Reo Saigo no Sakimori"?)
  5. "Guardian Yoki and Spenta Manyu" (防人ヨキとスプンタ・マンユ "Sakimori Yoki to Supunta Man'yu"?)
  1. "Raid the Spider's Thread" (突入!蜘蛛の糸 "Totsunyū! Kumo no Ito"?)
  2. "Shio vs. Yoki" (激突!!シオ対ヨキ!!! "Gekitotsu! Shio tai Yoki!!!"?)
  3. "Immortal Amesha Spenta" (不滅なる利益者達 "Amusha Spunta-tachi"?)
  4. "The Destruction of the Gods and the Birth of Man" (神々の滅亡と人の誕生 Kamigami no Metsubō to Hito no Tanjō"?)
After defeat Nohl, Shio and Leo have a briefly combat in which Shio wins. Elsewhere, Yoki reveals himself as the remaining Guardian and absorbs Qaf's Gojin-zou. Meanwhile, Matsuda is trying to escape from the Spider's Thread. When Shio, Leo and Fran arrives the Spider's Thread, Koto holds an unconscious Matsuda. Shio and Yoki fight while Yoki and Koto tells of how the red-bloodeds create the black-bloodeds who rebel against them—the red-bloodeds then create the machines to fight against the black-bloodeds. Regretful, the three magi create the Gojin-zou and bring back a red-blooded human, Matsuda, hoping the wish that will be fulfilled is to return the world to how it was before the war.
4 Wishes Granted
Negai Kanaishi (願い叶いし)
July 4, 2005[4]
ISBN 978-4-08-873846-8
May 4, 2010[11]
ISBN 978-1-4215-2741-3
  1. "Absolute Fusion" (完全融合 "Kanzen Yūgō"?)
  2. "Shadow" ( "Shadō?)
  3. "Chaos Without Kami I" (地獄とは神の在らざることなり① "Jigoku to wa Kami no Arazaru Kotonari Ichi"?)
  4. "Chaos Without Kami II" (地獄とは神の在らざることなり② "Jigoku to wa Kami no Arazaru Kotonari Ni"?)
  5. "Chaos Without Kami III" (地獄とは神の在らざることなり③ "Jigoku to wa Kami no Arazaru Kotonari San"?)
  1. "Sacred Kami's Blood I" (神の血のかくも尊きこと① "Kami no Chi no Kaku mo Tōtoki Koto Ichi"?)
  2. "Sacred Kami's Blood II" (神の血のかくも尊きこと② "Kami no Chi no Kaku mo Tōtoki Koto Ni"?)
  3. "Sacred Kami's Blood III" (神の血のかくも尊きこと③ "Kami no Chi no Kaku mo Tōtoki Koto San"?)
  4. "Wishes Granted" (願い叶いし "Negai Kanaishi"?)
After Yoki fatally injure Shio, Koto reveals he has been using Yoki to gain the power of all Gojin-zou filled with of wishes. Koto combines all Gojin-zou and go to the villages to kill the black-bloodeds. Meanwhile, Shio is resurrected by Matsuda's blood, and becomes stronger than he normally is. Shio engages Koto in battle; using the machine as distraction, Koto returns to the Spider's Thread, planning have his wish fulfilled. He cut Matsuda, spreading her blood; however, before he can wish something, Shio defeats him, and wishes the red-bloodeds to disappear. Now, Matsuda returns to her normal life, and the machines and black-bloodes coexist peacefully in Wāqwāq; Kiku says to the machines to do not attack humans anymore.

Reception[edit]

Three volumes appeared on the list of the Diamond Comic Distributors's 300 best-selling graphic novels. The first volume sold an estimated 555 copies, and appeared at the 205th spot for August 2009.[18] The third volume sold about 290 copies and appeared at the 299th spot on February 2010.[19]

While Karen Maeda and Amanda Tarbet of Sequential Tart,[20][21] Comic Book Bin's Leroy Douresseaux,[22] Mania's Patricia Beard,[23] and Pop Culture Shock's Sam Kusek said its art to be confusing,[24] Active Anime's Holly Ellingwood,[25] ICv2's Steve Bennett,[26] Anime News Network's Carlo Santos,[27] and a Publishers Weekly's reviewer praised its art.[28] Beard, Kusek and Tarbet criticized the story; the former qualified it as "poorly elaborated",[23] and the latter two found the story lacked of explanations about the plot.[21][24] On other hand, Ellingwood stated it is "an enthralling story" because there are mysteries to be discovered.[25] Michelle Smith from Pop Culture Shock praised how the plot was elucidated a bit in the second volume, but still thinking it was "convoluted".[29] Douresseaux described that in the second volume "the narrative runs a lot smoother, unencumbered" and Fujisaki's art were "a lot of clearer".[30]

Douresseaux,[22] Beard,[23] Bennett,[26] Santos[27] and Kusek described it as having elements from a typical shōnen series.[29] Conversely, Douresseaux stated "The eccentric narrative and the eclectic art makes the four-volume Wāqwāq unique graphical storytelling",[31] while Ellingwood declared "The originality and creativity in the story and the art work make it a stand out from the norm in manga."[32] Regarding its characters, Beard said the series has "memorable" ones, comparing Shio's personality to Gon Freecss from Hunter × Hunter,[23] and Maeda praised its variety,[20] while Tarbet praised their "not only believable but realistic" motivations.[21] On other hand, Kusek asserted "I don't really think Shio is that strong of a lead",[24] and Bennet criticized the non-development of the characters' relationships.[26] Tarbet wrote that its mithology is the most appealing characteristic of the series and praised the battle scenes involving other characters than Shio.[21] The action was also praised by Publishers Weekly,[28] Ellingwood,[25] Maeda,[20] and Santos, with the latter saying that it "does the remarkable" as reach "an epic finale" in only four volumes.[27]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "週刊少年ジャンプ 2004年 Vol. 40" (in Japanese). Shueisha. Archived from the original on March 9, 2006. Retrieved February 13, 2014. 
  2. ^ Fujisaki, Ryu (May 9, 2005). 34. "願い叶いし" [Wishes Granted]. Weekly Shōnen Jump. Waqwaq (in Japanese) (Shueisha) (23). 
  3. ^ a b "Waqwaq 1" (in Japanese). Shueisha. Archived from the original on March 5, 2005. Retrieved February 13, 2014. 
  4. ^ a b "Waqwaq 4" (in Japanese). Shueisha. Archived from the original on August 29, 2006. Retrieved February 13, 2014. 
  5. ^ "ワークワーク 1" (in Japanese). Shueisha. Archived from the original on February 14, 2014. Retrieved February 14, 2014. 
  6. ^ "ワークワーク 2" (in Japanese). Shueisha. Archived from the original on February 14, 2014. Retrieved February 14, 2014. 
  7. ^ "ワークワーク 3" (in Japanese). Shueisha. Archived from the original on February 14, 2014. Retrieved February 14, 2014. 
  8. ^ Aoki, Deb (July 2008). "San Diego Comic-Con 2008 – Shonen Jump Panel". About.com. InterActiveCorp. Archived from the original on May 27, 2009. Retrieved February 23, 2014. 
  9. ^ Shonen Jump (Viz Media) 7 (8): 19–73. August 2009. 
  10. ^ a b c "Waqwaq, Volume 1". Viz Media. Archived from the original on July 14, 2014. Retrieved February 13, 2014. 
  11. ^ a b c "Waqwaq, Volume 4". Viz Media. Archived from the original on July 14, 2014. Retrieved February 13, 2014. 
  12. ^ "文化傳信 日本漫畫香港中文版書目(20/9/2012更新)" (in Chinese). Hong Kong Comics and Animation Federation. p. 3. Archived from the original on February 15, 2014. Retrieved February 15, 2014. 
  13. ^ "创艺漫画目录" (in Chinese). Chuang Yi. Archived from the original on March 10, 2005. Retrieved February 14, 2014. 
  14. ^ "Waqwaq 2" (in Japanese). Shueisha. Archived from the original on August 29, 2006. Retrieved February 13, 2014. 
  15. ^ "Waqwaq, Volume 2". Viz Media. Archived from the original on July 14, 2014. Retrieved February 13, 2014. 
  16. ^ "Waqwaq 3" (in Japanese). Shueisha. Archived from the original on August 29, 2006. Retrieved February 13, 2014. 
  17. ^ "Waqwaq, Volume 3". Viz Media. Archived from the original on July 14, 2014. Retrieved February 13, 2014. 
  18. ^ "Top 300 Graphic Novels Actual--August 2009". ICv2. September 16, 2009. Archived from the original on July 14, 2014. Retrieved February 24, 2014. 
  19. ^ "Top 300 Graphic Novels Actual--February 2010". ICv2. March 11, 2010. Archived from the original on May 8, 2014. Retrieved February 24, 2014. 
  20. ^ a b c Maeda, Karen (October 26, 2009). "WaqWaq Vol. 2". Sequential Tart. Archived from the original on July 15, 2014. Retrieved February 21, 2014. 
  21. ^ a b c d Tarbet, Amanda (February 22, 2010). "WaqWaq Vol. 3". Sequential Tart. Archived from the original on July 15, 2014. Retrieved February 22, 2014. 
  22. ^ a b Douresseaux, Leroy (July 20, 2009). "Waqwaq: Volume 1". Comic Book Bin. Archived from the original on July 23, 2009. Retrieved February 16, 2014. 
  23. ^ a b c d Beard, Patricia (August 7, 2009). "Waq Waq Vol. #01". Mania. Archived from the original on July 15, 2014. Retrieved February 16, 2014. 
  24. ^ a b c Kusek, Sam (July 12, 2009). "Waqwaq, Vol. 1". Pop Culture Shock. Archived from the original on July 3, 2010. Retrieved February 16, 2014. 
  25. ^ a b c Ellingwood, Holly (July 12, 2009). "Waqwaq Vol. 1 (Advance review)". Active Anime. Archived from the original on July 15, 2014. Retrieved February 16, 2014. 
  26. ^ a b c Bennett, Steve (April 7, 2009). "Review of 'WaqWaq' Vol. 1 (Manga)". ICv2. Archived from the original on July 15, 2014. Retrieved February 24, 2014. 
  27. ^ a b c Santos, Carlo. "Little Twin Stars - Right Turn Only!!". Anime News Network. Archived from the original on July 15, 2014. Retrieved February 21, 2014. 
  28. ^ a b "WaqWaq, Vol. 1". Publishers Weekly. Archived from the original on February 28, 2014. Retrieved February 24, 2014. 
  29. ^ a b Smith, Michelle (November 23, 2009). "Manga Minis, 11/23/09". Pop Culture Shock. Archived from the original on July 2, 2010. Retrieved February 21, 2014. 
  30. ^ Douresseaux, Leroy (November 3, 2009). "Waqwaq: Volume 2". Comic Book Bin. Archived from the original on February 17, 2010. Retrieved February 21, 2014. 
  31. ^ Douresseaux, Leroy (February 11, 2010). "Waqwaq: Volume 3". Comic Book Bin. Archived from the original on February 19, 2010. Retrieved February 21, 2014. 
  32. ^ Ellingwood, Holly (July 6, 2009). "Waqwaq Vol. 4". Active Anime. Archived from the original on July 15, 2014. Retrieved February 21, 2014. 

External links[edit]