W. C. Riddick

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W. C. Riddick
Wallace C Riddick.jpg
Riddick pictured in '"Agromeck 1907, North Carolina State yearbook
Sport(s) Football
Biographical details
Born (1864-08-04)August 4, 1864
Wake County, North Carolina[1]
Died June 9, 1942(1942-06-09) (aged 77)
Baltimore, Maryland
Coaching career (HC unless noted)
1888–1889
1898–1899
Wake Forest
North Carolina A&M
Head coaching record
Overall 4–6–2
Statistics
College Football Data Warehouse

Wallace Carl Riddick, Jr. (August 4, 1864 – June 9, 1942) was an American football coach and college administrator. Riddick received his A.B. degree from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and his degree in civil engineering from Lehigh University in Pennsylvania. He served as a consultant for several water projects and for the Seaboard Railroad. Riddick was also a member of the Board of Visitors for the United States Naval Academy and of several state boards and committees. Because of his advocacy on the students' behalf, Riddick was awarded with the Officer's Cross of the Order of St. Sava by King Alexander of Yugoslavia in 1931.[2]

Coaching career[edit]

Riddick served as the head football coach at Wake Forest University from 1888 to 1889, and at North Carolina College of Agriculture and Mechanic Arts, now North Carolina State University, from 1898 to 1899, compiling a career college football record of 4–6–2

North Carolina State University[edit]

Riddick assumed the presidency at North Carolina State University following Daniel Harvey Hill, Jr.'s resignation in 1917. Riddick's administration added work to chemical, ceramics and aeronautics engineering, and developed an engineering experiment station. Riddick resigned as president in 1923 to become dean of the newly established school of engineering, and served in this capacity until his retirement in 1937. Riddick Stadium and Riddick Hall on N.C. State's campus were both named in honor of the former leader.[3] NCSU Libraries Special Collections Research Center serves as the repository for Wallace Carl Riddick's manuscript collection.[4]

Death[edit]

Riddick died at a Baltimore hospital on June 9, 1942 after weeks of ill health. His wife had predeceased him by a few weeks.[5]

Head coaching record[edit]

Year Team Overall Conference Standing Bowl/playoffs
Wake Forest Baptists (Independent) (1888–1889)
1888 Wake Forest 1–1
1889 Wake Forest 2–2
Wake Forest: 3–3
North Carolina A&M Aggies (Southern Intercollegiate Athletic Association) (1898–1899)
1898 North Carolina A&M 0–1
1899 North Carolina A&M 1–2–2
North Carolina A&M: 1–3–2
Total: 4–6–2

References[edit]

  1. ^ NCSU College of Engineering (2002). "A Visit with Eugenia Riddick Steck Brings Back Memories of Her Legendary Father". Retrieved 5 January 2012. 
  2. ^ Historical State: History in Red and White. "Wallace Carl Riddick: Fourth Chief Executive, 1916-1923". Retrieved 5 January 2012. 
  3. ^ NCSU Facilities. "Riddick Hall". Retrieved 5 January 2012. 
  4. ^ NCSU Libraries Special Collections Research Center. "MSS 00014 Guide to the Wallace Carl Riddick Papers, 1913 - 1980". Retrieved 5 January 2012. 
  5. ^ "Dr. Riddick, State College Veteran, Dies", Burlington Daily Times News, Tuesday, June 09, 1942, Burlington, North Carolina, United States Of America

External links[edit]