W. Eugene Davis

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William Eugene Davis
Judge of the United States Court of Appeals for the Fifth Circuit
Incumbent
Assumed office
November 16, 1983
Appointed by Ronald Reagan
Preceded by Robert Ainsworth
Judge of the United States District Court for the Western District of Louisiana
In office
September 21, 1976 – November 16, 1983
Appointed by Gerald Ford
Preceded by Richard Putnam
Succeeded by John Duhé
Personal details
Born August 1936
Winfield, Marion County

Alabama, USA

Political party Republican
Relations John Malcolm Duhé, Jr. (law partner)

Patrick T. Caffery (law partner)

Alma mater Samford University
Tulane University

William Eugene Davis, known as W. Eugene Davis (born August 1936), is a judge of the United States Court of Appeals for the Fifth Circuit. His chambers are in Lafayette, Louisiana.

Born in Winfield in Marion County in northwestern Alabama, Davis attended Samford University in Homewood, a suburb of Birmingham, Alabama. After three years at Samford, he received a scholarship to Tulane University Law School in New Orleans. There he received his J.D. in 1960 without having received an undergraduate degree (Samford awarded him a bachelor's degree in 2006). While at Tulane, Davis was a member of the Board of Editors of the Tulane Law Review. Davis was in private practice in New Orleans from 1960 to 1964, and then joined a law firm in New Iberia, Louisiana, where his partners were until 1976 Patrick T. Caffery and John Malcolm Duhé, Jr. In his private practice, he frequently represented the oil and gas industries.[1]

On August 5, 1976, Davis was nominated by President Gerald R. Ford, Jr., to a seat on the United States District Court for the Western District of Louisiana vacated by Richard J. Putnam. Davis was confirmed by the United States Senate on September 17, 1976, and received his commission on September 21, 1976.

President Ronald W. Reagan nominated Davis for elevation to the United States Court of Appeals for the Fifth Circuit on November 1, 1983, to a seat vacated by Robert Andrew Ainsworth, Jr., who died in 1981. Reagan at first considered Ben Toledano, a New Orleans lawyer and former Republican political candidate for the slot but withdrew the nomination after opposition surfaced from the NAACP. Davis was again confirmed by the United States Senate on November 15, 1983, and received his commission the following day.

Davis is one of three judges on a panel that will hear the appeal to Hornbeck Offshore Services LLC v. Salazar, a case challenging the U.S. Department of the Interior six month moratorium on exploratory drilling in deep water that was adopted in the wake of the Deepwater Horizon explosion and the subsequent oil spill. The Fifth Circuit panel denied the government's emergency request to stay the lower court's decision pending appeal.[2]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Sheppard, Kate. Moratorium Case Goes to Another Oily Court. Mother Jones. July 8, 2010.
  2. ^ Pelofsky, Jeremy.; Doggett, Tom. Court refuses stay in deepwater drilling case. Reuters Canada. July 8, 2010.

External links[edit]

Legal offices
Preceded by
Richard Putnam
Judge of the United States District Court for the Western District of Louisiana
1976–1983
Succeeded by
John Duhé
Preceded by
Robert Ainsworth
Judge of the United States Court of Appeals for the Fifth Circuit
1983–present
Incumbent