W. J. Abrams

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For the Canadian justice, see William Abrams.


W. J. Abrams
Member of the Wisconsin Senate
from the Brown County district
In office
1868–1869
Member of the Wisconsin State Assembly
from the Brown County district
In office
1864–1867
Personal details
Born (1829-03-19)March 19, 1829
Cambridge, New York, U.S.
Died September 12, 1900(1900-09-12) (aged 71)
Green Bay, Wisconsin, U.S.
Resting place Woodlawn Cemetery
Green Bay, Wisconsin
Political party Democratic
Spouse(s) Henrietta T. Alton Abrams
Children Kate Abrams
Ruth Abrams
Winford Abrams
Parents Isaac T. Abrams
Ruth (Hall) Abrams
Residence Green Bay, Wisconsin
Profession Railroad surveyor
Railroad businessman
Politician

William "W. J." Abrams (March 19, 1829 – September 12, 1900) was an American railroad surveyor, railroad businessman and politician. He served as a member of the Wisconsin State Senate and the Wisconsin State Assembly, and was Mayor of Green Bay, Wisconsin.

Early life[edit]

Abrams was born in Cambridge, New York, the son of Isaac T. Abrams and Ruth (Hall) Abrams.[1] He attended school in Cambridge and Troy, New York before studying theology in Williamstown, Massachusetts. He was not able to finish his studies due to poor health.[2]

Career[edit]

Abrams completed railroad surveys from Lake Michigan to Ontonogan, Michigan before moving to Wisconsin in 1856,[3] and settling in Green Bay in 1861. He was involved in water transportation facilities before becoming a railroad businessman. He was a promoter for the Green Bay and Lake Pepin Railroad, which would become the Green Bay and Western Railroad.[4] Abrams served as Chairman of the Board and President for the railroad.[5][6]

Abrams was a Democratic member of the State Assembly from 1864-1867[7] and the State Senate from 1868-1869.[8] He was later Mayor of Green Bay in 1881 and again from 1883-1884. He served as Vice-President of the Soldiers Orphans Home in Madison, Wisconsin.[9]

In 1881, Abrams owned land where the Chicago, Milwaukee, St. Paul and Pacific Railroad built a depot in the area that was to become Abrams, Wisconsin. The town of Abrams was named is his honor.[10]

Abrams died on September 12, 1900 in Wisconsin and is interred at Woodlawn Cemetery.[11]

Personal life[edit]

In 1854, Abrams married Henrietta T. Alton. They had three children, Kate, Ruth and Winford.[12] Their son Winford also served as Mayor of Green Bay.[13]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "W. J. Abrams (1829-1900)". City of Green Bay. Retrieved 2011-11-30. 
  2. ^ J.H. Beers & Co (1896). Commemorative Biographical Record of the West Shore of Green Bay, Wisconsin: Including the Counties of Brown, Oconto, Marinette and Florence, Containing Biographical Sketches of Prominent Citizens. J. H. Beers & Company. p. 117. 
  3. ^ "30 October 1966". The Post-Crescent. Retrieved February 27, 2014. 
  4. ^ J.H. Beers & Co (1896). Commemorative Biographical Record of the West Shore of Green Bay, Wisconsin: Including the Counties of Brown, Oconto, Marinette and Florence, Containing Biographical Sketches of Prominent Citizens. J. H. Beers & Company. p. 117. 
  5. ^ Wisconsin. Railroad Commissioners' Department (1897). Biennial Report of the Railroad Commissioner of the State of Wisconsin. Wisconsin. Railroad Commissioners' Department. p. 27. 
  6. ^ Wisconsin. Railroad Commissioners' Dept (1882). Annual Report of the Railroad Commissioners of the State of Wisconsin. Wisconsin. Railroad Commissioners' Dept. p. 245. 
  7. ^ French, Bella (1876). The American Sketch Book, Volume III, History of Brown County, Wisconsin: A Collection of Historical Incidents with Descriptions of Corresponding Localities. American Sketch Book Company. 
  8. ^ Wisconsin. Legislature. Assembly (1865). State of Wisconsin Assembly Journal, Volume 1865. Wisconsin Legislature. p. 672. 
  9. ^ Secretary of State (1870). State of Wisconsin Blue Book. Secretary of State. p. 338. 
  10. ^ "LUMBERING MAKES OCONTO COUNTY CITIES AND VILLAGES". Ancestry.com. Retrieved February 27, 2014. 
  11. ^ Martin, Deborah Beaumont (1913). History of Brown County, Wisconsin: Past and Present, Volume 2. S.J. Clarke Publishing Company. p. 439. 
  12. ^ "Mayors Past". Green Bay. Retrieved February 27, 2014. 
  13. ^ Martin, Deborah Beaumont (1913). History of Brown County, Wisconsin: Past and Present, Volume 2. S.J. Clarke Publishing Company. p. 439.