WBLX-FM

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WBLX-FM
WBLX.png
City of license Mobile, Alabama
Broadcast area Lower Alabama/Florida Panhandle
Branding 93BLX
Slogan "The Big Station 93BLX"
Frequency 92.9 MHz (also on HD Radio)
First air date October 1973
Format Mainstream Urban
ERP 98,000 watts
HAAT 520.5 meters (1709 feet)
Class C
Facility ID 2540
Transmitter coordinates 30°36′45″N 87°38′43″W / 30.61250°N 87.64528°W / 30.61250; -87.64528
Callsign meaning BLaX (a play on "Blacks", its target audience; see KBLX)
Former callsigns WBLX (1973-1988)[1]
Owner Cumulus Media
(Cumulus Licensing LLC)
Sister stations WABD, WDLT-FM, WGOK, WXQW
Webcast Listen Live
Website thebigstation93blx.com

WBLX-FM (92.9 FM, "93BLX") is an American Mainstream Urban music-formatted radio station that serves Mobile, Lower Alabama, and Pensacola, Florida. The station has served the Gulf Coast for more than 25 years. The station was assigned the WBLX-FM call letters by the Federal Communications Commission on July 4, 1988.[1] In 2006, WBLX began broadcasting in IBOC digital radio, using the HD Radio system from iBiquity.

History[edit]

WBLX began in October 1973 as FM counterpart to gospel station WMOO (1550 AM). As WBLX, with the Urban contemporary format, has been one of the market's leading stations with the same calls and format for about 25 years. In 1998, Cumulus acquired competitor WDLT-FM, and skewed it to being an Urban Adult Contemporary. This has allowed WBLX to skew its programming towards a younger audience as a Mainstream Urban. Also for many years, WBLX carried the "93BLX Jams" and "The Beat of the Bay" brandnames, however, in 2000 they changed their slogan to "The Big Station 93BLX".

Cumulus Broadcasting began upgrading its stations to HD Radio broadcasting in 2005. One of the first ten stations to be upgraded was WBLX.[2]

WBLX is one of the most powerful radio stations in the Gulf region. It can be heard from New Orleans, Montgomery, AL, South Georgia, and 100 miles out in the Gulf of Mexico.

Personnel[edit]

Station management includes operations manager James Alexander and program director/music director AL-MY-T.

One of the station's most famous broadcasts featured a part-time DJ that went by the name "Inetta the Mood Setta." She was evidently upset about the treatment she had received from some co-workers and station management and quit her job live on air[3] using the phrase "I quit this bitch," which infiltrated pop culture, showing up on t-shirts and in various internet posts.

References[edit]

External links[edit]