WDNT

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WDNT
WDNT-AM radio logo.jpg
City of license Dayton, Tennessee
Broadcast area Rhea County, Tennessee
Branding 1280 WDNT
Slogan Dayton's Hometown Radio
Frequency 1280 kHz
First air date December 6, 1957
Format Oldies
Language(s) English
Power 1,000 watts (day)
310 watts (night)
Class D
Facility ID 70783
Transmitter coordinates 35°30′40″N 85°00′36″W / 35.51111°N 85.01000°W / 35.51111; -85.01000
Callsign meaning W DaytoN, Tennessee
Former callsigns WDNT (1957-2006)
WALV (2/2006)[1]
Owner Beverly Broadcasting Company, LLC
Sister stations WRHA, WRKQ
Webcast Listen Live
Website rheacountyradio.com

WDNT (1280 AM) is an American radio station licensed to serve the community of Dayton, the county seat of Rhea County, Tennessee. Established in 1957, the station's broadcast license is held by Beverly Broadcasting Company, LLC.

Programming[edit]

Since June 2010, WDNT has broadcast an oldies music format similar to, but not always in simulcast with, sister station WRHA (970 AM, Spring City, Tennessee).[2][3] While the stations are mostly locally programmed and operated, since August 2011 both stations have aired the syndicated radio program The Donny Osmond Show for five hours each weekday.[4]

In addition to music programming, WDNT and WRHA broadcast Rhea County High School football games each Fall.[5]

History[edit]

Early days[edit]

This station began regular broadcast operations on December 6, 1957, with 1,000 watts of power on a frequency of 1280 kilohertz as a "daytimer", restricted to broadcasting between sunrise and sunset to limit skywave interference with other stations on the same frequency.[6] WDNT was the first radio station licensed by the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) to serve Dayton.[3]

Launched under the ownership of Norman A. Thomas with the broadcast license held by the Dayton Broadcasting Company, the station's original personnel included general manager Jack S. Pullin, chief engineer Eddie Lane, news director Bill Watts, farm director E.L. Tipps, and women's issues director Lois Massengill.[6] WDNT was an affiliate of the Keystone Network.[6]

The station maintained this affiliation through the 1970s and broadcast a full service country music format to Dayton, Tennessee, and surrounding Rhea County.[7][8][9] On July 1, 1976, WDNT added FM sister station "WNFM" (104.9 FM) which aired a middle of the road music format.[10] The FM station is now separately owned and licensed as "WALV-FM" (105.1 FM).[11]

1980s[edit]

WDNT owner Norman A. Thomas died in April 1980 at the age of 79.[12] Norman A. Thomas Jr., acting as executor of his father's estate, notified the FCC of the involuntary transfer of control of the license holder from father to son. The FCC approved the transfer on June 6, 1980.[13]

In September 1982, WDNT Broadcasting, Inc., reached an agreement to sell the station to Eaton P. Govan III. The FCC approved the deal on November 3, 1982, but formal consummation of the transaction was delayed until May 8, 1986.[14] Govan's turn as station owner was short-lived as in November 1986 he agreed to sell WDNT to the partnership of George R. Johnson and George Lewis Wyatt, doing business as Dayton Broadcasting Company. The FCC approved the sale on December 30, 1986 and the transaction was formally consummated on January 8, 1987.[15]

1990s[edit]

In December 1990, George Lewis Wyatt transferred his interest in Dayton Broadcasting Company to partner George R. Johnson, leaving Johnson as the sole license holder for WDNT. The FCC approved the transfer on January 8, 1991, and the deal was formally consummated on February 25, 1991.[16]

George R. Johnson, doing business as Dayton Broadcasting Company, contracted to sell WDNT and its assets to Walter E. Hooper III in October 1993. After lengthy deliberation, the FCC approved the sale on September 20, 1994, and the transaction was formally consummated on February 7, 1995.[17]

2000s[edit]

In March 2002, station owner Walter E. Hooper III reached an agreement to sell WDNT to Chattanooga-based Brewer Broadcasting through its J.L. Brewer Broadcasting of Cleveland, LLC, subsidiary. The FCC approved the sale on May 20, 2002, and the formal consummation of the deal took place on July 1, 2002.[18]

Because the land where the station's broadcast tower was located was sold to another party in a separate transaction, the station applied to the FCC for a construction permit to relocate their transmitter to a new location nearby in November 2002. The FCC granted the permit on February 19, 2003, with a scheduled expiration date of February 19, 2006.[19] Construction and testing were completed in December 2003 so the station applied for a new broadcast license to cover these changes. The FCC issued the new license on October 17, 2004.[20]

After nearly 50 years of continuous operation as "WDNT", the new owners had the station's call sign changed to "WALV" on February 2, 2006, as part of a complicated call sign shuffle among Brewer Broadcasting radio stations. The change was very short-lived as the station was reassigned the "WDNT" call sign by the FCC on February 26, 2006.[1]

In December 2007, Brewer Broadcasting agreed to sell WDNT to Whitfield Communications through a subsidiary known as East Tennessee Radio Group III, L.P.[21] The sale was part of a four station deal valued at $1,865,000 for the stations' broadcast licenses plus an additional $835,000 for the real estate including studio buildings, station offices, and the WDNT transmitter tower location for a total price of $2.7 million.[22] The three sister stations in the deal were WBAC (1340 AM, Cleveland, Tennessee), WXQK (970 AM, Spring City, TN), and WAYA (93.9 FM, Spring City, TN).[22] The FCC approved the group sale on January 31, 2008, and the deal was formally consummated on May 30, 2008.[23]

At the time of the sale, all three of the AM stations were simulcasting a news/talk radio format from studios in Cleveland, Tennessee. Programming included a local morning show plus syndicated conservative talk hosts including Rush Limbaugh and Sean Hannity. The only time during the week that the stations did not share a program stream was on Sunday mornings when each broadcast a different local church service.[24] While the sale was pending, Whitfield Communications began operating the station group under a local marketing agreement on December 1, 2007.[22] On January 12, 2008, WDNT and its sister stations became part-time affiliates of the Fox Sports Radio network, airing sports programming from midnight to 6 a.m. and 6 p.m. to midnight each weekday plus additional programming on Saturday and Sunday.[25][26]

WDTN today[edit]

In November 2009, Whitfield Communications spun off the two Rhea County-based AM stations (WDNT and WXQK) to Beverly Broadcasting Company, LLC, for just $27,000.[27] (This is only 1% of the $2.7 million price the four-station group and real estate combo had fetched less than two years earlier.) Beverly Broadcasting Company is owned by the husband-and-wife team of Mike and Sue Beverly, then based in Knoxville, Tennessee.[28] The FCC approved the sale on December 31, 2009, and the deal was formally consummated on January 14, 2010.[29]

However, while the Beverlys acquired the radio stations, they did not acquire the land on which the WDTN transmitter and broadcast antenna were located as those were sold to a third party.[28] For this reason, WDTN went dark on November 13, 2009, while the search for a new transmitter site was underway. On December 30, 2009, the FCC granted the station special temporary authority to remain silent until June 28, 2010.[30]

WDNT returned to the air with an oldies music format on June 6, 2010, with a temporary facility at the original WDNT broadcast tower site.[3] In June 2011, the station applied to the FCC for a new construction permit for a permanent tower site nearby. The FCC granted the permit on November 16, 2011, with a scheduled expiration date on November 16, 2014.[31]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "AM Call Sign History". CDBS Public Access Database. U.S. Federal Communications Commission Media Bureau. Retrieved December 8, 2011. 
  2. ^ "Station Information Profile". Arbitron. Retrieved December 8, 2011. 
  3. ^ a b c "Radio station returns to airwaves". The Herald-News (Dayton, TN). June 29, 2010. Retrieved December 8, 2011. 
  4. ^ "Rhea radio features star". The Herald-News (Dayton, TN). August 12, 2011. Retrieved December 8, 2011. 
  5. ^ "Games to be on radio". The Herald-News (Dayton, TN). August 16, 2011. Retrieved December 8, 2011. 
  6. ^ a b c "Directory of AM and FM Radio Stations in the U.S.". 1958 Broadcasting Yearbook. Washington, DC: Broadcasting Publications, Inc. 1958. p. A-368. 
  7. ^ "Directory of AM and FM Radio Stations in the U.S.". 1970 Broadcasting Yearbook. Washington, DC: Broadcasting Publications, Inc. 1970. p. B-186. 
  8. ^ "Directory of AM and FM Radio Stations in the United States and Canada". Broadcasting Yearbook 1975. Washington, DC: Broadcasting Publications, Inc. 1975. p. C-175. 
  9. ^ "Directory of Radio Stations in the United States and Canada". Broadcasting Yearbook 1980. Washington, DC: Broadcasting Publications, Inc. 1980. p. C-210. 
  10. ^ "Directory of Radio Stations in the United States and Canada". Broadcasting Yearbook 1977. Washington, DC: Broadcasting Publications, Inc. 1977. p. C-194. 
  11. ^ "FM Call Sign History". CDBS Public Access Database. FCC Media Bureau. Retrieved December 9, 2011. 
  12. ^ "Social Security Death Index Interactive Search". Rootsweb. Ancestry.com. Retrieved December 9, 2011. 
  13. ^ "Application Search Details (BTC-19800428FH)". FCC Media Bureau. June 6, 1980. Retrieved December 8, 2011. 
  14. ^ "Application Search Details (BAL-19820901GO)". FCC Media Bureau. May 8, 1986. Retrieved December 8, 2011. 
  15. ^ "Application Search Details (BAL-19861106GJ)". FCC Media Bureau. January 8, 1987. Retrieved December 8, 2011. 
  16. ^ "Application Search Details (BTC-19901217EA)". FCC Media Bureau. February 25, 1991. Retrieved December 8, 2011. 
  17. ^ "Application Search Details (BAL-19931025GH)". FCC Media Bureau. February 7, 1995. Retrieved December 8, 2011. 
  18. ^ "Application Search Details (BALH-20020326AAS)". FCC Media Bureau. July 1, 2002. Retrieved December 8, 2011. 
  19. ^ "Application Search Details (BP-20021105AAD)". FCC Media Bureau. February 19, 2003. Retrieved December 8, 2011. 
  20. ^ "Application Search Details (BL-20031222ACZ)". FCC Media Bureau. October 27, 2004. Retrieved December 8, 2011. 
  21. ^ "Whitfield Communications Acquires WBAC-AM, WDNT-AM, WXQK-AM, and WAYA-FM from Brewer Broadcasting" (Press release). Media Services Group. November 5, 2007. Retrieved December 8, 2011. 
  22. ^ a b c "Transactions: 1-07-08". Radio Business Report. January 7, 2008. Retrieved December 8, 2011. 
  23. ^ "Application Search Details (BAL-20071210ACN)". FCC Media Bureau. May 30, 2008. Retrieved December 8, 2011. 
  24. ^ "Rhea radio stations sold". The Herald-News (Dayton, TN). January 7, 2008. Retrieved December 8, 2011. 
  25. ^ "Making Moves: Morning Edition". Radio Info. January 14, 2008. Retrieved December 8, 2011. 
  26. ^ "FOX Sports Radio Affiliate Update". Premiere Networks. January 11, 2008. Retrieved December 8, 2011. 
  27. ^ "WCRB Sale Approved; Principle Buys KCNL; Disney Sells In Wichita". All Access. November 16, 2009. Retrieved December 8, 2011. 
  28. ^ a b "Radio returning to Rhea County". The Herald-News (Dayton, TN). November 24, 2009. Retrieved December 8, 2011. 
  29. ^ "Application Search Details (BAL-20091112AIV)". FCC Media Bureau. January 14, 2010. Retrieved December 8, 2011. 
  30. ^ "Application Search Details (BLSTA-20091117ABI)". FCC Media Bureau. December 30, 2009. Retrieved December 8, 2011. 
  31. ^ "Application Search Details (BP-20110614AAD)". FCC Media Bureau. November 16, 2011. Retrieved December 8, 2011. 

External links[edit]