WD 0806-661

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search

Coordinates: Sky map 08h 06m 53.736s, −66° 18′ 16.74″

WD 0806-661
Observation data
Epoch J2000[1]      Equinox J2000[1]
Constellation Volans
Right ascension 08h 06m 53.736s[1]
Declination −66° 18′ 16.74″[1]
Characteristics
Spectral type DQ4.2[2] [3] / Y?[4][5]
Apparent magnitude (B) 13.74[6] / -
Apparent magnitude (V) 13.71[6] / -
Apparent magnitude (R) 13.64[6] / -
Apparent magnitude (I) 13.60[6] / -
Apparent magnitude (J) 13.704 ± 0.023[1] / >23.9[7]
Apparent magnitude (H) 13.739 ± 0.025[1] / -
Apparent magnitude (K) 13.781 ± 0.043[1] / -
Astrometry
Proper motion (μ) RA: 88.0 ± 2.8[1] mas/yr
Dec.: 139.9 ± 1.3[1] mas/yr
Parallax (π) 52.17 ± 1.67[8] mas
Distance 63 ± 2 ly
(19.2 ± 0.6 pc)
Absolute magnitude (MV) 12.30[6] / -
Details
Component A
Mass 0.58 ± 0.03[6] M
Surface gravity (log g) 8.00 ± 0.05[6] cgs
Temperature 10205 ± 390[6] K
Age 0.62[6][note 1] Gyr
Component B
Mass 6–9[7] MJup
Temperature 300–345[7] K
Position (relative to A)
Component B
Angular distance 130.2 ± 0.2 [9]
Position angle 104.2 ± 0.2° [9]
Observed separation
(projected)
2500 AU [9]
Other designations
Component A:
BPM 4834, LAWD 27, L 97-3, LTT 3059, NLTT 19008, WD 0806-661, WD 0806-66, GJ 3483, 2MASS J08065373-6618167, GSC 08936-01284, GEN# +6.00204834, uvby98 986097003, WG 12

Component B:
WD 0806-661 B,[9][7] WD 0806-661B,[10] GJ 3483B[4]
Database references
SIMBAD data
Extrasolar Planets
Encyclopaedia
data

WD 0806-661 (L 97-3, GJ 3483) is a wide binary system of a white dwarf and a Y-type sub-brown dwarf (designated "B"), located in constellation Volans at 63 light-years from Earth. The companion was discovered in 2011. It has the largest actual (2500 AU) and apparent separation (more than 2 arcminutes) of any known planetary-mass object.

Discovery[edit]

Component B was discovered in 2011 with Spitzer Space Telescope. Its discovery paper is Luhman et al., 2011. At the time of its discovery, WD 0806-661 B was the coldest "star" that has ever been found, with a temperature of only 27–80 °C, which is similar to some hot areas of Earth.[9]

See also[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ White-dwarf cooling age, i.e. age as degenerate star (not including main-sequence lifetime).

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h i "GJ 3483 -- White Dwarf". SIMBAD. Centre de Données astronomiques de Strasbourg. Retrieved 2012-06-19. 
  2. ^ Holberg, J. B.; Sion, E. M.; Oswalt, T.; McCook, G. P.; Foran, S.; Subasavage, John P. (2008). "A New Look at the Local White Dwarf Population". The Astronomical Journal 135 (4): 1225–1238. Bibcode:2008AJ....135.1225H. doi:10.1088/0004-6256/135/4/1225.  edit
  3. ^ Sion, Edward M.; Holberg, J. B.; Oswalt, Terry D.; McCook, George P.; Wasatonic, Richard (2009). "The White Dwarfs Within 20 Parsecs of the Sun: Kinematics and Statistics". The Astronomical Journal 138 (6): 1681–1689. arXiv:0910.1288. Bibcode:2009AJ....138.1681S. doi:10.1088/0004-6256/138/6/1681.  edit
  4. ^ a b Rodriguez, David R.; Zuckerman, B.; Melis, Carl; Song, Inseok (2011). "The Ultra Cool Brown Dwarf Companion of WD 0806-661B: Age, Mass, and Formation Mechanism". The Astrophysical Journal Letters 732 (2): L29. arXiv:1103.3544. Bibcode:2011ApJ...732L..29R. doi:10.1088/2041-8205/732/2/L29.  edit
  5. ^ Kirkpatrick, J. D.; Gelino, C. R.; Cushing, M. C.; Mace, G. N.; Griffith, R. L.; Skrutskie, M. F.; Marsh, K. A.; Wright, E. L.; Eisenhardt, P. R.; McLean, I. S.; Mainzer, A. K.; Burgasser, A. J.; Tinney, C. G.; Parker, S.; Salter, G. (2012). "Further Defining Spectral Type "Y" and Exploring the Low-mass End of the Field Brown Dwarf Mass Function". The Astrophysical Journal 753 (2): 156. arXiv:1205.2122. Bibcode:2012ApJ...753..156K. doi:10.1088/0004-637X/753/2/156.  edit
  6. ^ a b c d e f g h i Giammichele, N.; Bergeron, P.; Dufour, P. (2012). "Know Your Neighborhood: A Detailed Model Atmosphere Analysis of Nearby White Dwarfs". The Astrophysical Journal Supplement 199 (2): 29. arXiv:1202.5581. Bibcode:2012ApJS..199...29G. doi:10.1088/0067-0049/199/2/29.  edit
  7. ^ a b c d Luhman, K. L.; Burgasser, A. J.; Labbé, I.; Saumon, D.; Marley, M. S.; Bochanski, J. J.; Monson, A. J.; Persson, S. E. (2012). "Confirmation of One of the Coldest Known Brown Dwarfs". The Astrophysical Journal 744 (2): 135. arXiv:1110.4353. Bibcode:2012ApJ...744..135L. doi:10.1088/0004-637X/744/2/135.  edit
  8. ^ Subasavage, J. P.; Jao, W. C.; Henry, T. J.; Bergeron, P.; Dufour, P.; Ianna, P. A.; Costa, E.; Méndez, R. A. (2009). "The Solar Neighborhood. XXI. Parallax Results from the CTIOPI 0.9 m Program: 20 New Members of the 25 Parsec White Dwarf Sample". The Astronomical Journal 137 (6): 4547–4560. arXiv:0902.0627. Bibcode:2009AJ....137.4547S. doi:10.1088/0004-6256/137/6/4547.  edit
  9. ^ a b c d e Luhman, K. L.; Burgasser, A. J.; Bochanski, J. J. (2011). "Discovery of a Candidate for the Coolest Known Brown Dwarf". The Astrophysical Journal Letters 730 (1): L9. arXiv:1102.5411. Bibcode:2011ApJ...730L...9L. doi:10.1088/2041-8205/730/1/L9.  edit
  10. ^ "WD 0806-661B -- Brown Dwarf (M<0.08solMass)". SIMBAD. Centre de Données astronomiques de Strasbourg. Retrieved 2012-06-19. 

External links[edit]