WGNC (AM)

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WGNC
City of license Gastonia, North Carolina
Slogan "News, Talk and Sports!"
Frequency 1450 kHz
Format News, Talk, and Sports
Power 1000 Watts
Class C
Transmitter coordinates 35°16′32″N 81°12′04″W / 35.27556°N 81.20111°W / 35.27556; -81.20111
Callsign meaning W Gastonia, NC
Owner Scott Neisler
Website http://www.wgnc.net/

WGNC (1450 AM) is a radio station broadcasting a News, Talk, and Sports format. Licensed to Gastonia, North Carolina, USA, it serves the Gastonia area.

The station is an affiliate of the Atlanta Braves[1] radio network, the largest radio affiliate network in Major League Baseball and is also an affiliate of the Washington Redskins [2] radio network.

History[edit]

Doug McSwain's father Pat McSwain started the AM station in 1939 and the FM station in 1947. The younger McSwain was vice president and general manager of WGNC when the family sold both stations to Beasley Broadcast Group in 1986.[3]

Six years after buying WCSL in Cherryville, Calvin Hastings bought WGNC and started KTC Broadcasting. In 1992 he bought WOHS in Shelby and began calling the three stations Piedmont Superstations.[4]

WCSL, WGNC and WOHS began airing Atlanta Braves baseball in 1993.[5] WGNC had served as the radio home of the Gastonia Rangers minor league team from 1990 to 1992.

On April 1, 1993, KTC took over WLON in Lincolnton in a lease agreement. WLON's Tim Biggerstaff would remain as morning DJ, and his show would be heard on all four KTC stations. News for the entire area would be expanded. The four stations aired UNC football and basketball, Dallas Cowboys and Washington Redskins NFL football, and CBS coverage of such events as The World Series and The Super Bowl.[6]

The four stations added the NFL Carolina Panthers when the team began playing in 1995. They also aired games of the NBA Charlotte Hornets[7] In 2000, the stations began airing the Redskins again instead of the Panthers (WGNC aired the Panthers if there was no conflict).[8]

Late in 1999, the four stations changed from country music to "super oldies." Biggerstaff, the program director, said country had moved away from its traditional sound. Lillie White remained as midday host, and Andy Foster was afternoon host. Local and sports remained important, and the stations aired the One-on-One sports radio network at night.[9]

In 2004, Biggerstaff was still hosting his show on WCSL and WLON despite diabetes-related health problems.[10] Later he moved to Lincolnton-based Hometown Radio's Shelby operation. On WADA he played classic country music, and he hosted a "Swap Shop" show on WGNC and WOHS. By this time he had experienced a kidney transplant and two pancreas transplants. On Memorial Day 2007, while on the air, Biggerstaff had a seizure and asked for help on the air, and a listener called 911. He ended up being interviewed by BBC London, Today and People Magazine.[11]

On Saturday November 22nd 2014, Sports on Tap w/ Kuveikis and The Dude debuted on WGNC.

References[edit]

  1. ^ "2010 Atlanta Braves Baseball Schedule". The Official Site of the Atlanta Braves. 
  2. ^ "2009 Washington Redskins Football Schedule". The Official Site of the Washington Redskins. 
  3. ^ Jeff Borden, "WZXI and WGNC Radio Signed on to New Owners," The Charlotte Observer, October 3, 1986.
  4. ^ "Radio Station WCSL Celebrates 25 Years," The Charlotte Observer, September 27, 1992.
  5. ^ John Glennon, "Radio Stations to Broadcast Braves Baseball Next Season," The Charlotte Observer, December 19, 1992.
  6. ^ Joe Marusak, "New Owner Will Cut Positions at WLON," The Charlotte Observer, March 24, 1993.
  7. ^ David Poole, "Sports Finds Many Homes on Dial," The Charlotte Observer, October 4, 1995.
  8. ^ David Scott, "Sports Business," The Charlotte Observer, November 20, 2000.
  9. ^ Sharon E. White, "Up-Tempo Oldies Push Country Aside at 4 Stations in Regional AM Network," The Charlotte Observer, December 5, 1999.
  10. ^ Joe DePriest, "New Friend Offers Gift for Ailing DJ," The Charlotte Observer, April 14, 2004.
  11. ^ Joe DePriest, "DJ's Listeners Friends in Need and in Deed," The Charlotte Observer, June 7, 2007.

External links[edit]