WGYV

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WGYV
WGYV-AM logo.png
City of license Greenville, Alabama
Broadcast area Butler County, Alabama
Slogan "We've Got People Talking!"
Frequency 1380 AM (kHz)
First air date August 18, 1948
Format Talk
Power 1,000 watts (day only)
Class D
Facility ID 7902
Transmitter coordinates 31°50′01″N 86°36′07″W / 31.83361°N 86.60194°W / 31.83361; -86.60194
Owner Robert John Williamson
Sister stations WKWL

WGYV (1380 AM) is a radio station licensed to serve Greenville, Alabama, USA. The station, established in August 1948, is currently owned by Robert John Williamson. In August 2008, WGYV was granted a construction permit to relocate to the Cincinnati suburb of Aurora, Indiana, but the move was not completed before the permit expired in August 2011. As of August 2013, WGYV is still broadcasting in Alabama.

Programming[edit]

WGYV broadcasts a conservative-leaning talk radio format featuring a mix of local and syndicated programming.[1] Local programs include a weekday morning hour of sports talk called "Talking Sports with Big C" hosted by Colin MacGuire,[2] and a weekend block hosted by Carolyn Griffin called "The Kingdom Building Broadcasting Network".[3][4] Syndicated programs include talk shows hosted by Laura Ingraham,[5] Rush Limbaugh,[6] Sean Hannity,[7] and Michael Savage.

History[edit]

The beginning[edit]

This radio station, Greenville's first, began regular operations on August 18, 1948, broadcasting with 250 watts of power on a frequency of 1400 kHz.[8][9] The station was assigned the WGYV call letters by the Federal Communications Commission.[10] The WGYV license holder, Greenville Broadcasting Company, was owned by a partnership of E. Vernon Stabler, Calvin Poole, and S.W. Ferrel, Jr.[8] In 1950, William H. Miller, Jr. took over as the station's general manager.[11]

Move to 1380[edit]

In 1956, WGYV received authorization from the FCC to change its broadcast frequency from 1400 to 1380 kHz.[12] This change allowed the station to increase its daytime signal strength to 1,000 watts but forced WGYV to switch to daytime-only operation.[12] At the time of the shift, J.D. Bell was serving as WGYV's chief engineer.[13]

WGYV would continue its full-service mix of contemporary music and country music through the 1960s and 1970s. William H. Miller, Jr. served as general manager of the station from 1950 through the late 1970s when C.S. Heartsill, Jr. stepped into the role.[14]

New ownership[edit]

In May 1982, the Greenville Broadcasting Corporation reached an agreement to sell this station to Butler Broadcasters, Inc. The deal was approved by the FCC on July 16, 1982.[15] In April 1984, Millard V. Oakley acquired control of WGYV through purchase of stock in Butler Broadcasters, Inc., from Robert W. Gallaher. The transfer of control was approved by the FCC on April 26, 1984, and the transaction was consummated on July 6, 1984.[16]

In May 1985, Butler Broadcasters, Inc., reached an agreement to sell this station to the William Terry Golden's Golden Broadcasting Company.[17] The deal was approved by the FCC on July 14, 1995, and the transaction was consummated on August 1, 1995.[18]

WGYV today[edit]

In October 2002, the Golden Broadcasting Company reached an agreement to sell this station to Robert John Wiliamson. The deal was approved by the FCC on November 29, 2002, and the transaction was consummated on December 16, 2002.[9][19] Williamson, began the process in January 2004 to relocate this station from central Alabama to southeastern Indiana.[20]

In October 2005, the station applied to the FCC for a change of community of license from Greenville, Alabama, to Aurora, Indiana.[21] The move would also bring a change of frequency to 1030 kHz and a reduction in power to 250 watts. (A separate application has been filed to increase that signal power to 500 watts.) The authorization for these major changes was granted on August 6, 2008. Aurora, Indiana, is a suburb of Cincinnati, Ohio.[22] The construction permit was allowed to expire on August 6, 2011.[21] As of August 2013, the station is still operating from Alabama.

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Station Information Profile". Arbitron. Retrieved May 19, 2009. 
  2. ^ "Talk show regular, MacGuire, now has his own show". Andalusia Star-News. September 8, 2005. 
  3. ^ "Local broadcast reaches world via Web". Andalusia Star-News. January 25, 2007. 
  4. ^ "KBBN each Sunday on WGYV". Greenville Advocate. February 17, 2007. 
  5. ^ "Radio Stations: Alabama". Laura Ingraham official website. Retrieved May 19, 2009. 
  6. ^ "Rush Stations: Alabama". The Rush Limbaugh Show. Retrieved May 19, 2009. 
  7. ^ "Affiliate Finder (use zip code 36037)". Sean Hannity official website. Retrieved May 19, 2009. 
  8. ^ a b "Directory of Standard (AM) Broadcasting Stations of the United States". Broadcasting-Telecasting 1949 Yearbook. Washington, DC: Broadcasting Publications, Inc. 1949. p. 70. 
  9. ^ a b "WGYV under new ownership". The Greenville Advocate. March 5, 2003. 
  10. ^ "Call Sign History". FCC Media Bureau CDBS Public Access Database. Retrieved May 19, 2009. 
  11. ^ "Directory of AM, FM, and TV Stations of the United States". Broadcasting-Telecasting 1950 Yearbook. Washington, DC: Broadcasting Publications, Inc. 1950. p. 71. 
  12. ^ a b "Directory of AM and FM Stations and Market Data for the United States". 1957 Broadcasting Yearbook-Marketbook. Washington, DC: Broadcasting Publications, Inc. 1957. p. 50. 
  13. ^ "Directory of AM and FM Radio Stations in the U.S.". 1958 Broadcasting Yearbook. Washington, DC: Broadcasting Publications, Inc. 1958. p. A-235. 
  14. ^ "The Facilities of Radio". 1979 Broadcasting Yearbook. Washington, DC: Broadcasting Publications, Inc. 1979. p. C-4. 
  15. ^ "Application Search Details (BAL-19820528FA)". FCC Media Bureau. July 16, 1982. 
  16. ^ "Application Search Details (BTC-19840411HI)". FCC Media Bureau. July 6, 1984. 
  17. ^ "William Terry Golden". Greenville Advocate. March 29, 2008. 
  18. ^ "Application Search Details (BAL-19950531EB)". FCC Media Bureau. August 1, 1995. 
  19. ^ "Application Search Details (BAL-20021021AAO)". FCC Media Bureau. December 16, 2002. 
  20. ^ "Application for Construction Permit for Commercial Broadcast Station (BMJP-20040130BBK)". Federal Communications Commission. January 30, 2004. 
  21. ^ a b "Application Search Details (BMJP-20051031AGM)". FCC Media Bureau. August 6, 2008. 
  22. ^ "America's Junction". Mayflower Tours. Retrieved May 19, 2009. A suburb of Cincinnati, Aurora began as a stop on the Underground Railroad that secretly aided runaway slaves. [dead link]

External links[edit]