WJHX

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
WJHX
City of license Lexington, Alabama
Broadcast area Huntsville, Alabama
Branding La Jefa
Frequency 620 kHz
Format Mexican Regional
Power 5,000 watts (day)
99 watts (night)
Class D
Facility ID 14051
Transmitter coordinates 34°58′37″N 87°22′10″W / 34.97694°N 87.36944°W / 34.97694; -87.36944
Former callsigns WWLX (1981-1987)
WKNI (1987-2000)
WZNN (2000-2004)[1]
Owner Bar Broadcasting, Inc.
Sister stations WQCR, WZGX
Website www.aquimandalajefa.com

WJHX (620 AM, "La Jefa") is a radio station licensed to the community of Lexington, Alabama, USA. The station is owned by Bar Broadcasting, Inc. This station, WIXI, and WZGX comprise the "La Jefa" radio network that covers central Alabama, north Alabama, and central Tennessee.

Programming[edit]

WJHX broadcasts a Spanish language Mexican Regional music format to the Huntsville, Alabama, area.[2] The station is one of three in the area that broadcast in Spanish. The others are WKAC in Athens, Alabama, which broadcasts some weekend programming in Spanish, and WYAM in Hartselle, Alabama.

History[edit]

In July 1983, WWLX owners Wright, Wright, & Sanders agreed to sell this station to Roger W. Wright. The deal was approved by the FCC on September 6, 1983, and the transaction was consummated on September 13, 1983.[3]

In March 1986, Roger W. Wright worked out a deal to sell WWLX to Allen Carwile. The deal was approved by the FCC on April 17, 1986, and the transaction was consummated on June 4, 1986.[4] On March 21, 1987, the station's call letters were changed by the Federal Communications Commission to WKNI.[1]

In December 1987, Allen Carwile made a deal to sell WKNI to Country Boy Communications, Inc. The deal was approved by the FCC on January 20, 1988, but the transaction was never consummated and Carwile retained ownership of the station.[5] In July 1988, Allen Carwile reached a new deal to sell this station to Doris Harrison. The deal was approved by the FCC on August 29, 1988, and the transaction was consummated on September 20, 1988.[6]

In December 1990, Doris Harrison made a deal to sell this station to Creative Broadcasting Co., Inc. The deal was approved by the FCC on February 25, 1991, but the transaction was not consummated and Harrison retained ownership of the station.[7] In November 1991, Doris Harrison contracted to sell this station to Country Boy Communications, Inc., who had attempted to purchase the station from its previous owner back in 1988. The deal was approved by the FCC on July 26, 1992, and the transaction was consummated on February 19, 1993.[8]

In December 1995, Country Boy Communications, Inc., reached an agreement to sell this station to Pulaski Broadcasting, Inc. The deal was approved by the FCC on February 13, 1996, and the transaction was consummated on April 10, 1996.[9] In August 1996, Pulaski Broadcasting, Inc., agreed to sell this station to Richard W. Dabney for a reported sale price of $125,000.[10] The deal was approved by the FCC on September 30, 1996, and the transaction was consummated on November 22, 1996.[11] The station was assigned new callsign WZNN on May 18, 2000.[1]

In February 2002, Richard W. Dabney contracted to sell WZNN to Manuel Huerta for a reported sale price of $100,000.[12] The deal was approved by the FCC on April 4, 2003, and the transaction was consummated on May 30, 2002.[13] At the time of the sale, WZNN broadcast a sports radio format.[12] The station changed call letters to WJHX on May 13, 2004.[1]

In February 2005, Manuel Huerta reached an agreement to sell WJHX to Bar Broadcasting, Inc. The deal was approved by the FCC on April 21, 2005, and the transaction was consummated on December 30, 2005.[14]

Controversy[edit]

In October 2008, the FCC settled with former station licensee Manuel Huerta after he had failed to file a timely license renewal in December 2003 and failed to properly maintain the station's public file.[15] The fine, originally assessed at $16,000, was reduced to $12,800 citing Huerta's history of compliance with FCC regulations.[15]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d "Call Sign History". FCC Media Bureau CDBS Public Access Database. 
  2. ^ "Station Information Profile". Arbitron. 
  3. ^ "Application Search Details (BAL-19830718EM)". FCC Media Bureau. September 13, 1983. 
  4. ^ "Application Search Details (BAL-19860304FG)". FCC Media Bureau. June 4, 1986. 
  5. ^ "Application Search Details (BAL-19871207EA)". FCC Media Bureau. January 20, 1988. 
  6. ^ "Application Search Details (BAL-19880627EC)". FCC Media Bureau. September 20, 1988. 
  7. ^ "Application Search Details (BAL-19901203EJ)". FCC Media Bureau. February 25, 1991. 
  8. ^ "Application Search Details (BAL-19911113EF)". FCC Media Bureau. February 19, 1993. 
  9. ^ "Application Search Details (BAL-19951201GL)". FCC Media Bureau. April 10, 1996. 
  10. ^ "Changing Hands - 9/2/1996". Broadcasting & Cable. September 2, 1996. 
  11. ^ "Application Search Details (BAL-19960807EA)". FCC Media Bureau. November 22, 1996. 
  12. ^ a b BIA Financial Networks (March 4, 2002). "Changing Hands". Broadcasting & Cable. 
  13. ^ "Application Search Details (BAL-20020225AAF)". FCC Media Bureau. May 30, 2002. 
  14. ^ "Application Search Details (BAL-20050201BIX)". FCC Media Bureau. December 30, 2005. 
  15. ^ a b "Lexington Station Hit With $12,800 FCC Fine". Radio Ink: Hispanic Radio Weekly. October 7, 2008. 

External links[edit]