WNEU

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WNEU
WNEU60.png
Merrimack, New Hampshire/
Boston, Massachusetts
United States
City of license Merrimack, New Hampshire
Branding Telemundo Boston
Channels Digital: 34 (UHF)
Virtual: 60 (PSIP)
Subchannels 60.1 Telemundo
60.2 Exitos TV
Affiliations Telemundo
Owner NBCUniversal
(operated by ZGS Communications)
(NBC Telemundo License LLC)
First air date 1987
Call letters' meaning New
England
TelemUndo
Sister station(s) WTMU-LP
Former callsigns WGOT (1987–1998)
WPXB (1998–2002)
Former channel number(s) Analog:
60 (UHF, 1987–2009)
Former affiliations independent (1987–1996)
inTV (1996–1998, 1999–2000)
Pax TV (1998–1999)
ShopNBC (2000–2002)
Transmitter power 80 kW
Height 293 m
Facility ID 51864
Transmitter coordinates 42°59′2.4″N 71°35′18.6″W / 42.984000°N 71.588500°W / 42.984000; -71.588500
Licensing authority FCC
Public license information: Profile
CDBS
Website [1]

WNEU, virtual channel 60 (UHF digital channel 34), is the Telemundo-affiliated television station serving Boston, Massachusetts, United States that is licensed to Merrimack, New Hampshire. The station is owned by the NBCUniversal Owned Television Stations subsidiary of NBCUniversal and operated by ZGS Communications, as a full-power relay of WTMU-LP (channel 46), primarily serving Boston's northern suburbs and southern New Hampshire. WNEU maintains studio facilities located on Main Street (near the Boston Harbor) in Charlestown, and its transmitter is located in Goffstown, New Hampshire.

History[edit]

WNEU's logo from 2002 until 2008
Former WNEU logo, used from 2008 to 2012.

The station first signed on the air in 1987 as WGOT, operating as an independent station. The call sign was derived from the so-called "Golden Triangle" region that encompasses Manchester, Nashua and Salem, New Hampshire. For a time, the station aired a primetime newscast at 10:00 p.m. that was anchored by current NHDOT spokesperson Bill Boynton. Paxson Communications purchased the station in the 1990s, and switched WGOT to a mix of infomercials and religious programming, as an affiliate of the Infomall TV Network (or inTV).

In 1998, the station changed its call sign to WPXB and subsequently became a charter owned-and-operated station of Pax TV (now Ion Television) when it launched on August 31, 1998; the station dropped Pax programming in 1999 after Paxson acquired WABU (channel 68, now WBPX-TV), due to conflicts in the immediate Boston area with WABU, and in New Hampshire itself with WNBU (channel 21, now WPXG-TV). After briefly rejoining inTV, the station switched to ValueVision in 2000, which later became ShopNBC. NBC acquired the station from Paxson in 2002 and changed its call sign to WNEU; it eventually dropped ShopNBC programming in favor of affiliating with Telemundo, via a simulcast of ZGS Broadcasting's WTMU-LP (then on channel 32; now on channel 46), which continues to this day.

During its Paxson ownership, WGOT/WPXB owned a translator in Boston, Massachusetts, W40BO (which was previously used the call letters W33AV, WRAP-LP, W54AT and W54CN). When NBC purchased channel 60, Paxson retained W40BO, which has since become a translator of WBPX-TV.

Digital television[edit]

Digital channels[edit]

The station's digital channel is multiplexed:

Channel Video Aspect PSIP Short Name Programming[1]
60.1 1080i 16:9 WNEU-HD Main WNEU programming / Telemundo
60.2 480i 4:3 EXITOS Exitos TV
60.3 SNL SOI Dark

Analog-to-digital conversion[edit]

WNEU shut down its analog signal, over UHF channel 60, on June 12, 2009, the official date in which full-power television stations in the United States transitioned from analog to digital broadcasts under federal mandate. The station's digital signal remained on its pre-transition UHF channel 34.[2] Through the use of PSIP, digital television receivers display the station's virtual channel as its former UHF analog channel 60, which was among the high band UHF channels (52-69) that were removed from broadcasting use as a result of the transition.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

External links[edit]