WOPX-TV

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WOPX-TV
Orlando, Florida
City of license Melbourne, Florida
Branding Ion Television
Slogan Positively Entertaining
Channels Digital: 48 (UHF)
Affiliations Ion Television
Owner Ion Media Networks, Inc.
(Ion Media Orlando License, Inc.)
First air date May 19, 1986; 28 years ago (1986-05-19)
Call letters' meaning Orlando's PaX TV
Former callsigns WAYK (1985-1992)
WIRB (1992-1998)
Former channel number(s) Analog:
56 (UHF, 1986-2009)
Former affiliations independent (1986-1998)
inTV (1998)
Pax TV (1998-2005)
i (2005-2007)
Transmitter power 1000 kW
Height 456 m
Facility ID 67602
Transmitter coordinates 28°5′37″N 81°7′28″W / 28.09361°N 81.12444°W / 28.09361; -81.12444
Website www.iontelevision.com

WOPX-TV is a television station based in Orlando, Florida, USA. An affiliate of the Ion Television network, it transmits its digital signal on UHF channel 48, from a transmitter located near Holopaw. The station signed on the air in 1986.

Digital television[edit]

WOPX's digital signal is multiplexed:

Digital channels[edit]

Channel Video Aspect PSIP Short Name Network
56.1 720p 16:9 ION Ion Television
56.2 480i 4:3 qubo qubo
56.3 IONLife Ion Life
56.4 Shop Ion Shop
56.5 QVC QVC
56.6 HSN HSN


Station History[edit]

Initially the station had a general entertainment format as WAYK, running cartoons as well as barter syndicated first run shows, low budget movies, and whatever sitcoms were offered on a barter basis. They were owned by Beach TV Partners. Their signal out of Melbourne barely reached Orlando and did not reach Daytona Beach at all. As a result they did not buy strong programming and continued to have very low ratings.

When WMOD went to a continuous home shopping service, WAYK picked up cartoons which were offered at low cost on a barter basis. In 1988, Beach TV Partners signed on WAYQ at channel 26, giving them a signal in Daytona Beach. The stations would simulcast.

In 1992, the stations were both sold to Robert Rich, who added more paid programming to the channels. WAYK became WIRB, and WAYQ became WNTO. WIRB continued as a low budget independent station but also aired some NBC programs that were not cleared by WESH most notably Leeza (before it went into syndication) and California Dreams. WIRB would air Florida Marlins baseball, Florida Panthers hockey, and Tampa Bay Lightning hockey to Central Florida from around 1993-1996. In 1996 Christian Television Network would buy WIRB (Paxson Communications, now ION Media Networks, took a LMA on the station at the same time) while Florida Media Broadcasters would buy WNTO (which would be later sold to Entravision and became WVEN). WIRB then ran religious shows in the morning, infomercials in the afternoon and evening, and Christian praise and worship music on overnights in addition to the NBC programs not cleared by WESH. In January 1998, Paxson bought the station from CTN and renamed it WOPX and continued with the same format until August 31, 1998.

On August 31, 1998 WOPX took the Pax TV affiliate on along with other stations owned by Paxson. Pax TV introduced family entertainment like dramas, movies, reality shows aimed at the family, game shows, and other programming.

Originally, Pax TV ran from noon to midnight, but has since reduced its schedule several times. It now runs from 6 pm to 11 pm, and there are no original programs on the network, which has been renamed ION. WOPX still fills the rest of its schedule with infomercials and religious shows. WOPX of recent has also carried Tampa Bay Rays Baseball and Tampa Bay Lightning hockey from ION's Tampa affiliate and produced by Fox Sports.

On September 4, 2004, WOPX showed the NASCAR Nationwide Series (then Busch) from Fontana due to local NBC (who at that time broadcast NBS races) affiliate WESH's coverage of Hurricane Francis.

Until the summer of 2005, WOPX had a JSA with WESH, which, during that time, WOPX aired a rebroadcast of WESH's 6 p.m. newscast at 7 p.m.. In July 2005, Paxson dissolved all relationships with other stations, mostly NBC stations—at that time, WESH's news repeats on WOPX ended.

External links[edit]