WSFL-FM

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
WSFL-FM
Wsfllogo.png
City of license New Bern, North Carolina
Broadcast area Kinston, New Bern, Havelock
Branding 106.5 WSFL
Frequency 106.5 MHz
First air date April 29, 1968
Format Classic rock
ERP 100,000 watts
HAAT 279 meters
Class C1
Facility ID 70497
Transmitter coordinates 35°02′27.00″N 77°21′11.00″W / 35.0408333°N 77.3530556°W / 35.0408333; -77.3530556
Owner Beasley Broadcast Group
Sister stations WIKS, WMGV, WXNR, WNCT-FM
Webcast Listen Live
Website wsfl.com

WSFL-FM is an FM classic rock radio station located in New Bern, North Carolina that broadcasts to the entire eastern region of North Carolina at 106.5 MHz. It has been around for several decades and is considered a fixture in the local community.

History[edit]

WSFL was one of the first Top 40 FM stations in North Carolina. During the 1980s the format switched to adult contemporary.

In December 1986, Caravelle Broadcast Group Inc. completed its purchase of WSFL-FM and Kinston radio stations WISP and WQDW.[1]

In March 1989, after Ayatollah Khomeini issued a fatwā against Salman Rushdie for writing The Satanic Verses, WSFL-FM burned all of its Cat Stevens records.[2]

During Operation Desert Storm the market lost so many military-base listeners that WSFL and several other stations went off the air for a while, but WSFL-FM came back with an album rock format.[citation needed] By 1994, WSFL-FM was airing John Boy and Billy.[3]

In 1995, WSFL/1380 became WCOO after J4 Broadcasting bought the station along with WCKO in Norfolk, Virginia and WCKN in Myrtle Beach, South Carolina. These stations began using the WCIN "Classic Oldies" format of R&B, jazz and blues.[4]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "The Carolinas," The Charlotte Observer, December 10, 1986.
  2. ^ "Cat Stevens Albums to Get Hot Treatment," The Charlotte Observer, March 3, 1989.
  3. ^ Tim Funk, "14th Station Picks Up John Boy and Billy," The Charlotte Observer, August 25, 1994.
  4. ^ Greg Paeth, "WCIN 'Classic Oldies' format expanding into syndication," The Cincinnati Post, June 6, 1995.

External links[edit]