WWJT-LP

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WWJT-LP & WEFG-LD
WWJT CHANNEL 7 logo.png
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
United States
Channels Digital: 48 (UHF)
Virtual: 7 (PSIP)
Subchannels 7.1 TV Scout
7.2 Wize Buys
7.3 Launch TV
7.4 FilmOn
7.5 Infomercials
7.6 WWJT Programming
7.7 WWJT Programming
7.8 Religious Radio
Affiliations Independent
Owner Philadelphia Television Network Inc.[1][2]
First air date August 16, 1991
Former callsigns W07CB (1991-2001)
WPTV-LP (Nov.-Dec. 2001)[3]
WWJT-LP (2001-2010)[4]
Former channel number(s) 7 (VHF analog 06/16/2010)[5][6][7]
Former affiliations Channel America/Family Net (1992-1995?)
Transmitter power 464 W (License[8][9])
10 kW (CP[10][11])
Height 336 m (1,102 ft)
AMSL: 399 m (1,309 ft)
Class LD (Digital LPTV)
Facility ID 43869 (WWJT-LP analog)
167606 (WEFG-LD digital)
Transmitter coordinates 40°02′19″N 75°14′14″W / 40.03861°N 75.23722°W / 40.03861; -75.23722 (WEFG-LD), WEFG-LDCoordinates: 40°02′19″N 75°14′14″W / 40.03861°N 75.23722°W / 40.03861; -75.23722 (WEFG-LD), WEFG-LD, Roxborough, Philadelphia
51 dBu Service Contour (Lic)
51 dBu Service Contour (CP)
Website Channel 7 WJJT

WWJT-LP, channel 7, is a digital low power independent television station serving Philadelphia, Pennsylvania transmitting on channel 48 UHF. The station is owned by Philadelphia Television Network Inc. since November 10, 1999.[1][2] The station suspended analog operations June 16, 2010.[5]

History[edit]

Introduction[edit]

Channel 7 first appeared in 1991 as W07CB, the first Philadelphia-licensed VHF television station since May 1948.

In 1992, W07CB, not affiliated with a major network, aired reruns and old B-movies. Former affiliations included Channel America and FamilyNet. General Manager and part-owner Ron Joseph telecast reruns of his 1970s-era disco dance shows. The station achieved some degree of success under Joseph's stewardship. However, a dispute between the four owners of the station resulted in the decreased influence of Joseph over station affairs.

Changes[edit]

Within a year, the station underwent a series of management changes. Dr. Walter Moxley IV, an Infectious Diseases specialist with no previous broadcasting experience, was named the new general manager. His son Michael Moxley [1] was brought in to host local programming and acquire new revenue streams. Viewership and revenue picked up, but the station's transmitter was vandalized causing the station to go off the air for several weeks. As a result of being off the air, advertisement revenue dried up, and Michael Moxley departed W07CB to attend Penn State.

By June 1994, the station's parent company Morton Broadcasting named George Brusstar, operator of small but profitable cable television operations in the Philadelphia suburbs, as its Director of Programming. All of the station's programming was abruptly scrapped along with the station's then-slogan ("T-V Heaven, Channel 7"). The station's new logo became "The Bell", modeled after Philadelphia's Liberty Bell according to Brusstar. Replacing the old disco shows, classic westerns, and vintage sitcoms was a new format of 24-hour "two-way talk" programming featuring live TV hosts sitting at a desk with telephones. Viewers could call in live and sound off on the issues of the day with the hosts. Brusstar hired former Philadelphia radio performer Dennis Marcucci and Modesto, California television personality Al Mario to host shows on the new lineup. In addition, Brusstar himself was a featured host, and was joined by then-17-year-old Port Richmond resident Mike Phillips.

A contractual dispute in late 1994 resulted in Brusstar's sudden departure, and all local programming ceased. Brusstar was replaced by Mario who hired local college students, activists, and radio personalities in an attempt to cement a stable evening line-up. Programs included music ("Dr. Soul's Radio on TV"), comedy ("A Sermon from the Reverend Spoonicci"), and current events commentaries from Mario, homelessness activist Leona Smith, and libertarian Sean McBride. From 11 p.m. to 7 a.m., programming consisted of live TV psychics from a low-power New York City station brought in via satellite. By June 1995, infighting between owners forced W07CB off the air.

Return to the air, decline, and the return of Channel 7[edit]

When Channel 7 next appeared, it was clear Ron Joseph was back in control; for weeks on end, a two hour VHS tape loop of his recent wedding played continuously. Joseph attempted to take the station back entirely via a loophole in the partnership agreement (partner Moxley was imprisoned for the assault of a family member). Joseph later operated a low-power TV channel in Wildwood-Cape May, New Jersey, W05AX.

In 1996, with few advertisers left, Morton Broadcasting was dissolved and the Federal Communications Commission license for Channel 7 was sold to Shooting Star Productions. Executive Producer Jerry Leazer created a 24/7 music video programming format concentrating on the music roots of The Sounds Of Philadelphia. The format was an immediate success and Morton Broadcasting spent over a year trying to break the contract between Morton Broadcasting and Shooting Star Productions so they could sell the station for a higher price now that Leazer had dramatically increased the station's value. Shooting Star Productions, which had been represented by Reed Smith Shaw and McClay in Philadelphia and Richard Glanton, ultimately sold their interest to Glanton to avoid any further litigation. By the end of the 1990s, Channel 7 reduced its power[citation needed], and programmed modern rap music videos. It could only be seen 1.5 miles (1 km) from its Philadelphia transmitter, as opposed to a 14-mile radius just a few years before. The station currently transmits a strongly-directional pattern, aiming most of its signal to the south-southwest portions of Philadelphia with lower power in other directions. This is to protect WABC-TV in New York, also on Channel 7, about 70 miles (112 km) away.

On July 31, 1998, the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) granted W07CB voluntary transfer of control from Ronald Joseph Caponigro to Digital Media T.V.[12][13]

On November 10, 1999 Morton Broadcasting Company sold W07CB to Philadelphia Television Network, Inc.[1][2]

The W07CB call letters were changed to WPTV-LP in November 2001; (not related to full power WPTV in West Palm Beach, Florida). A month later, the call letters were changed again to WWJT-LP.

WWJT was relaunched on October 15, 2006 as African Community Television. The station aired a mix of news, movies, infomercials and music videos, as well as various African shows.

Analog to digital[edit]

On January 27, 2010 WWJT received a second call sign WWJT-LD[4] for digital facility ID 167606 in Roxborough, Philadelphia antenna farm while sill retaining call sign WWJT-LP[3] for analog facility ID 43869 at 1515 Market Street, Center City Philadelphia.

On June 16, 2010 WWJT-LP ceased analog transmission due to its analog transmitter and video server suffering catastrophic failures, keeping the station off the air until the launch of digital WWJT-LD.[5]

Starting on or about November 17, 2011, WWJT-LD began broadcasting a digital signal on virtual channel 7 showing just the call letters and its three sub channels displaying a color test pattern. All 4 channels are currently in 480i SD digital format. WWJT-LD changed its call sign to WEFG-LD on January 1, 2014.

Digital channels[edit]

Channel Video Aspect PSIP Short Name Programming
7.1 480i 4:3 WWJT-7 TV Scout
7.2 WWJT-7 Wize Buys
7.3 WWJT-7 Launch TV
7.4 WWJT-7 FilmOn
7.5 WWJT-7 Infomercials
7.6 WWJT-7 WWJT Programming
7.7 WWJT-7 WWJT Programming
7.8 WWJT-7 Religious Radio
Table data as of January 15, 2014

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c "FCC Application Search Details - BAPLTVL-19990802JA Assignment of Permit/License". FCC.gov. Federal Communications Commission. Accepted 08/02/1999; Granted 09/20/1999; Consummation 11/10/1999. 
  2. ^ a b c "FCC Public Notice Comment - BAPLTVL-19990802JA Assignment of Permit/License". FCC.gov. Federal Communications Commission. Accepted 08/02/1999; Granted 09/20/1999; Consummation 11/10/1999. 
  3. ^ a b "FCC Call Sign History - Facility ID 43869". FCC.gov. Federal Communications Commission. 
  4. ^ a b "FCC Call Sign History - Facility ID 167606". FCC.gov. Federal Communications Commission. 
  5. ^ a b c "FCC Notification of Suspension of Operations / Request for Silent STA - BLSTA-20100708EWE". FCC.gov. Federal Communications Commission. Silent 06/16/2010. 
  6. ^ "FCC Application Search Details - BLTVL-20070112AIC License to Cover". FCC.gov. Federal Communications Commission. Accepted 01/22/2007; Granted 03/22/2007. 
  7. ^ "FCC Engineering Data - BLTVL-20070112AIC License to Cover". FCC.gov. Federal Communications Commission. Accepted 01/22/2007; Granted 03/22/2007. 
  8. ^ "FCC Application Search Details - BLDTL-20111115ARB License to Cover". FCC.gov. Federal Communications Commission. Accepted 11/17/2011; Granted 11/29/2011. 
  9. ^ "FCC Engineering Data - BLDTL-20111115ARB License to Cover". FCC.gov. Federal Communications Commission. Accepted 11/17/2011; Granted 11/29/2011. 
  10. ^ "FCC Application Search Details - BPDTL-20120306ABU Minor Change to a Licensed Facility". FCC.gov. Federal Communications Commission. Accepted 03/07/2012; Granted 03/16/2012. 
  11. ^ "FCC Engineering Data - BPDTL-20120306ABU Minor Change to a Licensed Facility". FCC.gov. Federal Communications Commission. Accepted 03/07/2012; Granted 03/16/2012. 
  12. ^ "FCC Application Search Details - BTCTVL-19980609IE Transfer of Control". FCC.gov. Federal Communications Commission. Accepted 06/09/1998; Granted 07/31/1998. 
  13. ^ "FCC Public Notice Comment - BTCTVL-19980609IE Transfer of Control". FCC.gov. Federal Communications Commission. Accepted 06/09/1998; Granted 07/31/1998. 

External links[edit]