Waffle Shop: A Reality Show

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Waffle Shop: A Reality Show
Waffle Shop logo
Artist Jon Rubin and Carnegie Mellon University students
Year 2008 (2008) - 2012 (2012)
Type Performance art, talk show, restaurant
Location East Liberty, Pittsburgh
Coordinates Coordinates: 40°27′37.2″N 79°55′30.3″W / 40.460333°N 79.925083°W / 40.460333; -79.925083

Waffle Shop: A Reality Show was a performance art project and restaurant in the East Liberty neighborhood of Pittsburgh. The restaurant was operated by Carnegie Mellon University students.[1][2] The Waffle Shop was part of a trend in Pittsburgh to support performance art within the urban core.[3] In addition to serving food, students operate a talk show live-streamed online, featuring restaurant patrons as guests.[4][5]

It opened in 2008 by Carnegie Mellon University art professor Jon Rubin as a 2-semester student art project.[6] The project/restaurant was so successful during that initial run that it was continued for several more years.[7]

Some special talk shop themes have included ringtones as "art."[8]

The related sign atop the building was also used for public art purposes,[9] and later became known as The Last Billboard. The billboard is still in place and continues to be changed periodically.

Local food critics reviewed it relatively favorably, noting the unique talk show situation.[10][11]

It closed in 2012.

See also[edit]

Photo gallery[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Waffle Shop is Hiring for All Positions this Summer!". Carnegie Mellon University. May 11, 2012. Retrieved August 28, 2012. 
  2. ^ Supinka, Carolyn (October 5, 2009). "Ideas, waffles make tasty contest". The Tartan. Retrieved August 28, 2012. 
  3. ^ Smydo, Joe (2012-08-13). "Program designed to expand artwork through Pittsburgh". Pittsburgh Post-Gazette. Retrieved August 28, 2012. 
  4. ^ McCoy, Adrian (December 8, 2008). "East Liberty Waffle Shop merges food, reality video". Pittsburgh Post-Gazette. Retrieved August 28, 2012. 
  5. ^ Farley, John (November 16, 2010). "Waffle? Sure. Interview? Why not.". Pop City (Pittsburgh). Archived from the original on August 28, 2012. Retrieved August 28, 2012. 
  6. ^ Jones, Diana Nelson (March 29, 2012). "Conflict Kitchen Project serves the food of adversary nations to bring people together". Pittsburgh Post-Gazette. Retrieved August 28, 2012. 
  7. ^ McCoy, Adrian (June 29, 2009). "CMU merges art with reality TV and fresh waffles". Pittsburgh Post-Gazette. Retrieved August 28, 2012. 
  8. ^ Venishnick, Anna (October 4, 2011). "Let's Talk About Art: Ringtones as art". Pittsburgh Post-Gazette. Retrieved August 28, 2012. 
  9. ^ Riely, Kaitlynn (May 30, 2012). "East Liberty's Waffle Shop has the writings on the board". Pittsburgh Post-Gazette. Retrieved August 28, 2012. 
  10. ^ Bennett, Samantha (November 17, 2011). "The turducken's fine, but the peach could use a shave". Pittsburgh Post-Gazette. Retrieved August 28, 2012. 
  11. ^ "Munch goes to the Waffle Shop and the Conflict Kitchen". Pittsburgh Post-Gazette. July 22, 2010. Retrieved August 28, 2012. 

External links[edit]

Media related to Waffle Shop: A Reality Show at Wikimedia Commons