Waiting to Exhale: Original Soundtrack Album

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Waiting to Exhale: Original Soundtrack Album
Soundtrack album by Whitney Houston/Various Artists
Released November 14, 1995 (1995-11-14)
Recorded May, 1995 - October, 1995
Genre R&B[1]
Length 72:51
Label Arista
Producer Babyface
Whitney Houston chronology
The Bodyguard: Original Soundtrack Album
(1992)
Waiting to Exhale: Original Soundtrack Album
(1995)
The Preacher's Wife: Original Soundtrack Album
(1996)
Singles from Waiting to Exhale: Original Soundtrack Album
  1. "Exhale (Shoop Shoop)"
    Released: November 7, 1995
  2. "Sittin' Up in My Room"
    Released: December 12, 1995
  3. "Not Gon' Cry"
    Released: January 23, 1996
  4. "Count on Me"
    Released: March 4, 1996
  5. "Let It Flow"
    Released: May 21, 1996
  6. "It Hurts Like Hell"
    Released: June 24, 1996
  7. "Why Does It Hurt So Bad"
    Released: July 22, 1996
Toni Braxton's "Let It Flow" from Waiting to Exhale: Original Soundtrack Album and Secrets

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Waiting to Exhale: Original Soundtrack Album is a soundtrack for the film of the same name. Released on November 14, 1995, the soundtrack became a huge hit featuring appearances by some of the biggest names in the industry, including Whitney Houston, Brandy, Mary J. Blige, Toni Braxton, Aretha Franklin, Chaka Khan, Faith Evans, Patti LaBelle, SWV and TLC. The soundtrack is unique in that it consists of African American female R&B artists only. The album remained at number one on the US Billboard 200 album chart for five weeks and Top R&B Albums chart for ten weeks, going 7× platinum, on Sep 4, 1996. It spawned the #1 hits; "Exhale (Shoop Shoop)" and "Let It Flow", the #2 hits "Sittin' Up in My Room" and "Not Gon' Cry" and the #8 hit "Count on Me". ("Exhale (Shoop Shoop)", "Let It Flow" and "Not Gon' Cry" all topped the R&B hits chart.) All songs were written and produced by Babyface, except for "My Funny Valentine".

The album received a total of eleven nominations including Album of the Year, Song of the Year for "Exhale (Shoop Shoop)"and three Best Female R&B Vocal Performance nominees, then won Best R&B Song for "Exhale (Shoop Shoop)" written by Babyface at the 39th Grammy Awards in 1997.[2]

Commercial performance[edit]

Waiting to Exhale Original Soundtrack Album entered on the Billboard 200 chart at number three and on the Top R&B/Hip-Hop Albums chart at number two respectively, the issue date of December 2, 1995, with 177,248 copies sold in its initial week.[3][4][5] In its third week, the album reached number one on the Billboard Top R&B Albums chart, selling 200,000 copies, and stayed there for 10 non-consecutive weeks.[6] It also topped the Billboard 200 chart in its 8th week, the issue date of January 20, 1996, with 231,000 units sold, and spent five consecutive weeks at number one.[7][8] The album stayed for a total of 49 weeks and 70 weeks, on the Billboard 200 chart and the Top R&B Albums chart respectively.[9][10] With this success on the charts and strong sales, it became 1996's "No. 1 Soundtrack Album" on the Billboard year-end charts and the "Best-selling Soundtrack Recording" by the National Association of Recording Merchandisers (NARM) in 1995–1996.[11][12] The soundtrack album was certified 7× Platinum for shipping 7 million copies in the United States alone by the Recording Industry Association of America (RIAA) on September 4, 1996.[13] According to the Nielsen SoundScan, as of 2009, it sold over 5,100,000 copies in the United States.[14] Worldwide, sales exceed 15 million copies.

Critical reception[edit]

Professional ratings
Review scores
Source Rating
Allmusic 4/5 stars[15]
Billboard (Positive)[16]
Chicago Tribune 2.5/4 stars[1]
Robert Christgau A–[17]
Entertainment Weekly (B)[18]
Los Angeles Times 2.5/4 stars[19]
New York Times (Positive)[20][21][22]
Rolling Stone (unfavorable)[23]
Spin (Positive)[24]
Washington Post (Positive)[25]

Upon release, Waiting to Exhale Soundtrack received critical acclaim. Stephen Holden and Jon Pareles of the New York Times praised Babyface's ability as composer and producer, both choosing the album as one of the top 10 albums of 1995. Hoden described him as "the most creative pop-soul musician since the prime of Stevie Wonder", and commented "he has created a suite of songs that evoke women's emotional and sexual fantasies with an astonishing sympathy, directness and expressive range."[26] Pareles stated "Babyface gathers most of the sultriest female singers in current rhythm-and-blues and matches them with his own tender, gently pulsating songs. He uses understatement for seduction."[20][21] Writing for New York Times on February 2, 1997, James Hunter called Waiting to Exhale Soundtrack "one of the commercial and artistic peaks of the new rhythm-and-blues."[22] Geoffrey Himes, in an editorial review for Amazon.com, stated that the soundtrack album is "a fascinating song suite, [...] and one of the best middle-of-the-road-pop, adult-contemporary albums of the decade." Among its sixteen songs, he complimented "Not Gon' Cry" performed by Mary J. Blige especially, commenting "Babyface's music and lyrics suggest a woman barely holding back a swelling flood of anger and heartache, and Blige's brilliant vocal captures both the agitation and the restraint."[27] Josef Woodard of Entertainment Weekly gave the album an B, stating "Babyface shows an uncanny ability to blend Houston's pleasant, soft-edged commerciality with the sexually explicit and cutting-edge hip-hop of TLC. [...] The album goes down easy, just as you'd expect from a package framed by Whitney Houston tracks. Fittingly, the soundtrack waits to exhale, hovering in sensuous suspense."[18] Jean Rosenbluth from Los Angeles Times noted Babyface's lyrics, saying "he has captured what it can mean to be a woman in 1995." In addition, she praised Whitney Houston and Toni Braxton for their vocals, stating their songs "with rich, smoky vocals as thick as Inland Empire smog, exude maturity without resorting to the relentlessly big vocals that characterize so many R&B records aiming for adult audiences."[19] However unlike other critics that praised Babyface for his producing and songwriting ability on the album highly, Greg Kot, the music critic of the Chicago Tribune, was critical of his lyrics and production. Kot wrote "while Babyface's notions are noble, his lyrics too often settle for cliches instead of specifics, and the arrangements are swathed in the kind of synthesized wallpaper that is turning black pop into bland pop. [...] In achieving a dignified elegance, Babyface forgot about the soul."[1] Craig Lytle with Allmusic rated Waiting to Exhale soundtrack four out-of five stars, and in his review of the album, paid more attention to female vocalists and their performances than lyrics or production for each track, calling the album "outstanding all-female set." Lytle said "the dynamic vocalist[Whitney Houston] sails through the emotional 'Why Does It Hurt So Bad.' On the inspirational duet 'Count on Me,' with CeCe Winas, and both accomplished singers raise all hopes with their comforting vocals", and went to on comment "[on] three stellar selections by three divas ㅡ Aretha Franklin, Patti LaBelle, and Chaka Khan, their voices just defy time by soaring to admirable feats."[15] Billboard magazine described the soundtrack album as "an impeccably timed album with unlimited hit potential", and commented that it is "passionate" ("Sittin' Up in My Room"), "saucy" ("This Is How It Works"), "jazzy" ("Wey U"), and "torch" ("Count on Me").[16]

Singles[edit]

"Exhale (Shoop Shoop)", performed by Whitney Houston, was released as the lead single from the soundtrack in November 1995. Billboard called the song "a surprisingly understated shuffle-ballad with soul and far more interesting vocal colors than all the shrieking can provide."[28] The single debuted at number one on the Billboard Hot 100 Singles chart and the Hot R&B Singles chart, the issue date of November 25, 1995, selling 125,000 units in its first week.[29][30] It became the third single to achieve that feat in Billboard history, following Michael Jackson's "You Are Not Alone" and Mariah Carey's "Fantasy".[29] In addition, it became Houston's eleventh and seventh number one single, on the Hot 100 Singles chart and the Hot R&B Singles chart, respectively.[31] After the single stayed at the top for just one week on the Hot 100 Singles chart, it spent eleven consecutive weeks at number two from December 2, 1995 to February 10, 1996, setting the record for the longest stay in the runner-up position.[32][33] However, on the Hot R&B Singles chart, "Exhale (Shoop Shoop)" remained at the summit for eight consecutive weeks since its debut week.[34] It sold over 1,500,000 copies in 1995-1996 and was certified Platinum by the RIAA on January 3, 1996.[35][36][37]

The album's second single, "Sittin' Up in My Room" by Brandy, debuted at number forty-six and number thirteen, on the Hot 100 Singles chart and Hot R&B Singles chart, the issue date of December 30, 1995, respectively.[34][38] The single reached the number two on the Hot R&B Singles chart, the issue of February 17, 1996 and stayed there three consecutive weeks.[39] It also peaked at number two on the Hot 100 Singles chart, staying on the chart for a total of thirty-three weeks.[40] Cheo Hodari Coker from the Los Angeles Times praised Babyface for his production on the song, stating "Babyface's funky-but-restrained background track is the real star of this jam. Using a pleasant mixture of plunking bass and synthesizer chords, [the song] proves that he has a grabbag of styles at his disposal."[41] The single earned Platinum award by the RIAA on May 23, 1996, with 1,000,000 copies sold.[36][42]

"Not Gon' Cry" by Mary J. Blige was released as the third single in January 1996. It was critically acclaimed with most of them declaring it as "an anthem for many women."[15][41] Geoffrey Himes of Amazon.com commented "Mary J. Blige stakes out a claim as the new diva on the block with an astonishing performance on the song."[27] The single entered on the Hot R&B singles chart at number five in its initial week and the following week topped the chart, becoming her fourth number one single.[43] It remained at the top for five consecutive weeks and stayed on the chart for a total of twenty-two weeks.[39] It also became a major hit for Blige on the Billboard Hot 100 Singles chart, peaking at number two position.[6] With first two singles from the album, when "Not Gon' Cry" was positioned in the top 10 on the Hot 100 and Hot R&B Singles chart in February 1996, which made Waiting to Exhale Soundtrack to set the record for the first film soundtrack to produce three simultaneous top 10 hits in history of Billboard charts. The single sold over 1,500,000 units and was certified Platinum by the RIAA on May 23, 1996.[36][44]

The fourth single from the soundtrack, "Count on Me" performed by Whitney Houston and CeCe Winans, was released in March 1996. Billboard, in their review for the single, referred it as "a buddy song for the diva generation", and complimented both singers on their excellent vocal, commenting "Houston dominates the track, though Winans makes a strong-enough impression that those who have yet to hear her fine recordings will yearn to hear more."[45] The single debuted at number thirty-two and number eleven, on the Hot 100 and Hot R&B Singles chart, the issue of March 23, 1996, respectively.[46][47] And it peaked at number eight on the Hot 100 and number seven on the Hot R&B Singles chart in May 1996, in addition to reaching number four on Adult Contemporary chart.[48][49][50] It was certified Gold by the RIAA on May 1, 1996, with 800,000 copies sold in the United States.[36][51]

The album's fifth single, "Let It Flow" by Toni Braxton, was released as a two-sided single with "You're Makin' Me High" from Braxton's second album, Secrets, in May 1996. The double-A side single debuted at number seven on the Hot 100 and number two on the Hot R&B Singles chart, the issue dated June 8, 1996, becoming her highest-debuting single.[52][53] It eventually topped the Hot 100 chart for a week, and the Hot R&B Singles chart for two weeks, which was her first number one single on both charts.[54][55][56] Due to its staying power on the Hot R&B Singles chart, it was the #1 R&B Single on the 1996's Billboard year-end charts.[57][58] The single sold over 1,500,000 copies in the United States and was certified Platinum by the RIAA on July 17, 1996.[36][59] Just as soon as the soundtrack was released, the song received critical acclaim, being chosen as one of the best tracks on the album by critics. Stephen Holden, the music critic of the New York Times, called it "small pop coup" and added "Braxton snaps out the words with a choked intensity, her dark, grainy contralto conveying a potent mixture of fury and sensuality."[26]

"It Hurts Like Hell" by Aretha Franklin was released as the sixth single from the album in June 1996. It failed to enter on the Hot 100 chart, but peaked at number fifty-one on the Hot R&B Singles chart, the issue date of July 20, 1996.[60] The song wasn't hit as big as some of the set's other tracks, but got good reviews at large from critics. Stephen Holden of the New York Times wrote "Franklin rises to heights of letting-it-all-out pop-gospel anguish that she has rarely reached before. Just when you think she can't spill out another drop, there is another melismatic gush of emotion."[26] Geoffrey Himes, in his review for the Washington Post, commented "the album's peak moment belongs to Aretha Franklin, who makes us hear in every note what the title of [the song] is talking about."[25]

"Why Does It Hurt So Bad" by Whitney Houston became the seventh and final single to be released off the album in July, 1996. Christopher John Farley of the TIME magazine commented "Houston more than holds her own, particularly on [this], with its masterly balance of pop zip and soulful melancholy."[61] At the time the single was issued, Billboard said "this should have been the follow-up to 'Exhale (Shoop Shoop)'" and added "she[Houston] was positively luminous on this heartbreak ballad."[62] On August 3, 1996, the single debuted at number sixty and number thirty-four, on the Hot 100 and Hot R&B singles chart, respectively.[63][64] In a few weeks later, it peaked at number twenty-six on the Hot 100 and number twenty-two on the Hot R&B.[65][66] Houston performed the song at the 1996 MTV Movie Awards. The track was also included in a medley along with "I Believe in You and Me" and "It Hurts Like Hell" in her set list on her My Love Is Your Love World Tour in 1999.

Also of note, "This Is How It Works" by TLC and "My Funny Valentine" by Chaka Khan reached numbers 60 and 66 respectively on the Billboard R&B Airplay chart in early 1996 based on unsolicited radio airplay, while "Kissing You" by Faith Evans reached #57 on the R&B Airplay chart as well as #14 on the Billboard Hot R&B Singles chart as the B-side tag along to her single "Ain't Nobody".

Track listing[edit]

No. Title Writer(s) Performer(s) Length
1. "Exhale (Shoop Shoop)"   Babyface Whitney Houston 3:24
2. "Why Does It Hurt So Bad"   Babyface Whitney Houston 4:37
3. "Let It Flow"   Babyface Toni Braxton 4:27
4. "It Hurts Like Hell"   Babyface Aretha Franklin 4:19
5. "Sittin' Up in My Room"   Babyface Brandy 4:52
6. "This Is How It Works"   Babyface, Lisa Lopes TLC 5:00
7. "Not Gon' Cry"   Babyface Mary J. Blige 4:57
8. "My Funny Valentine"   Richard Rodgers, Lorenz Hart Chaka Khan 4:06
9. "And I Gave My Love to You"   Babyface, Sonja Marie Sonja Marie 4:48
10. "All Night Long"   Babyface SWV 4:31
11. "Wey U"   Babyface Chanté Moore 4:32
12. "My Love, Sweet Love"   Babyface Patti LaBelle 4:21
13. "Kissing You"   Babyface Faith Evans 3:23
14. "Love Will Be Waiting at Home"   Babyface For Real 5:59
15. "How Could You Call Her Baby"   Babyface Shanna 5:09
16. "Count on Me"   Babyface, Whitney Houston, Michael Houston Whitney Houston and CeCe Winans 4:26

Notes

  • All new songs produced by Babyface.

Charts and certifications[edit]

Singles chart positions[edit]

Year Single Peak chart positions
US
Hot 100
US R&B US AC CAN UK AUS FRA GER IRL NED NZ SWE SWI
1995 "Exhale (Shoop Shoop)"
(performed by Whitney Houston)
1
[29]
1
[30]
5
[84]
1
[85]
11
[86]
18
[87]
23
[88]
16
[89]
16
[90]
12
[91]
4
[92]
10
[93]
13
[94]
"Sittin' Up in My Room"
(performed by Brandy)
2
[40]
2
[39]
33
[95]
30
[96]
6
[97]
60
[98]
1996 "Not Gon' Cry"
(performed by Mary J. Blige)
2
[6]
1
[43]
39
[99]
12
[100]
"Count on Me"
(performed by Whitney Houston & CeCe Winans)
8
[48]
7
[49]
4
[50]
26
[101]
12
[86]
75 34
[91]
26
[92]
31
[94]
"You're Makin' Me High"/"Let It Flow" (B-side)
(performed by Toni Braxton)
1
[55]
1
[54]
9
[102]
28
[103]
"It Hurts Like Hell"
(performed by Aretha Franklin)
51
[60]
"Why Does It Hurt So Bad"
(performed by Whitney Houston)
26
[65]
22
[66]
6
[84]
45
[104]
"—" denotes releases that did not chart

Chart procession and succession[edit]

Preceded by
Daydream by Mariah Carey
Billboard 200 number-one album
January 20 – February 23, 1996 (5 weeks)
Succeeded by
Jagged Little Pill by Alanis Morissette
Preceded by
R. Kelly by R. Kelly
Str8 off tha Streetz of Muthaphukkin Compton by Eazy-E
Billboard Top R&B/Hip-Hop Albums Chart number-one album
December 16, 1995 – February 16, 1996
February 24, 1996 – March 1, 1996 (10 weeks)
Succeeded by
Str8 off tha Streetz of Muthaphukkin Compton by Eazy-E
All Eyez on Me by 2Pac

Accolades[edit]

American Music Awards[edit]

Year Recipient Award Result
1997 Waiting to Exhale Original Soundtrack Album Favorite Soundtrack[105] Won
Whitney Houston (herself) Favorite Adult Contemporary Artist[105] Won

ASCAP Film & Television Music Awards[edit]

Year Recipient Award Result
1997 "Count on Me" Most Performed Songs, Motion Pictures (Whitney Houston, Michael Houston)[106][107] Won

ASCAP Pop Music Awards[edit]

Year Recipient Award Result
1997 "Count on Me" ASCAP Pop Award (Whitney Houston, Michael Houston)[108] Won

Billboard Music Awards[edit]

Year Recipient Award Result
1996 "You're Makin' Me High"/"Let It Flow" R&B Single of the Year[57] Won

BMI (Broadcast Music Incorporated) Pop Awards[edit]

Year Recipient Award Result
1997 Kenneth "Babyface" Edmonds The Songwriter of the Year[109] Won
"Count on Me" BMI Pop Award (Kenneth "Babyface" Edmonds)[110] Won
"Exhale (Shoop Shoop)" BMI Pop Award (Kenneth "Babyface" Edmonds)[110] Won
"Sittin' Up in My Room" BMI Pop Award (Kenneth "Babyface" Edmonds)[110] Won

Grammy Awards[edit]

Year Recipient Award Result
1997 Waiting to Exhale Original Soundtrack Album Album of the Year[2] Nominated
"Exhale (Shoop Shoop)" Song of the Year (written by Babyface)[2] Nominated
"Count on Me" Best Pop Collaboration with Vocals (Whitney Houston & CeCe Winans)[2] Nominated
"Exhale (Shoop Shoop)" Best R&B Song (written by Babyface)[2] Won
"Sittin' Up in My Room" Best R&B Song (written by Babyface) Nominated
"Exhale (Shoop Shoop)" Best Female R&B Vocal Performance (Whitney Houston)[2] Nominated
"Not Gon' Cry" Best Female R&B Vocal Performance (Mary J. Blige)[2] Nominated
"Sittin' Up in My Room" Best Female R&B Vocal Performance (Brandy)[2] Nominated
"It Hurts Like Hell" Best Song Written for a Motion Picture, Television or Other Visual Media (written by Babyface)[2] Nominated
"Count on Me" Best Song Written for a Motion Picture, Television or Other Visual Media (written by Babyface, Michael Houston and Whitney Houston)[2] Nominated
"Exhale (Shoop Shoop) Best Song Written for a Motion Picture, Television or Other Visual Media (written by Babyface)[2] Nominated

MTV Movie Awards[edit]

Year Recipient Award Result
1996 "Exhale (Shoop Shoop)" (by Whitney Houston) Best Song from a Movie[111] Nominated
"Sittin' Up in My Room" (by Brandy) Best Song from a Movie[111] Won

MTV Video Music Awards[edit]

Year Recipient Award Result
1996 "Sittin' Up in My Room" (by Brandy) Best Video from a Film[112] Nominated

NAACP Image Awards[edit]

Year Recipient Award Result
1997 Waiting to Exhale Original Soundtrack Album Outstanding Soundtrack Album[113][114] Won
Outstanding Album[113][114] Won
"Exhale (Shoop Shoop)" Outstanding Song[113][114] Won
Outstanding Female Artist (Whitney Houston)[113][114] Won

The NARM Best Seller Awards[edit]

Year Recipient Award Result
1996 Waiting to Exhale Original Soundtrack Album Best-selling Soundtrack Recording[12] Won

People's Choice Awards[edit]

Year Recipient Award Result
1996 Whitney Houston (herself) Favorite Female Musical Performer[115] Nominated
1997 Whitney Houston (herself) Favorite Female Musical Performer[116][117] Nominated

Recording Industry Association of America (RIAA) Awards[edit]

Year Date Title Format(s) Award description(s) Result(s)
1996 January 3 "Exhale (Shoop Shoop)" Single Gold[37] Won
"Exhale (Shoop Shoop)" Single Platinum[37] Won
January 16 Waiting to Exhale Original Soundtrack Album Album Gold[13] Won
Waiting to Exhale Original Soundtrack Album Album Platinum[13] Won
Waiting to Exhale Original Soundtrack Album Album 4× Mult-Platinum[13] Won
February 14 "Sittin' Up in My Room" Single Gold[42] Won
March 12 "Not Gon' Cry" Single Gold[44] Won
March 19 Waiting to Exhale Original Soundtrack Album Album 5× Mult-Platinum[13] Won
May 1 "Count on Me" Single Gold[51] Won
May 23 "Sittin' Up in My Room" Single Platinum[42] Won
"Not Gon' Cry" Single Platinum[44] Won
May 28 Waiting to Exhale Original Soundtrack Album Album 6× Mult-Platinum[13] Won
July 17 "You're Makin' Me High"/"Let It Flow" Single Gold[59] Won
"You're Makin' Me High"/"Let It Flow" Single Platinum[59] Won
September 4 Waiting to Exhale Original Soundtrack Album Album 7× Mult-Platinum[13] Won

Soul Train Lady of Soul Awards[edit]

Year Recipient Award Result
1996 "Not Gon' Cry" Best R&B/Soul Single— Solo (Mary J. Blige)[118][119] Won
"Exhale (Shoop Shoop)" Best R&B/Soul Single—Solo (Whitney Houston)[118] Nominated
"Count on Me" R&B/Soul Composer of the Year (written by Whitney Houston, Kenneth Edmonds and Michael Houston)[120] Nominated

Soul Train Music Awards[edit]

Year Recipient Award Result
1996 "Exhale (Shoop Shoop)" (by Whitney Houston) Best R&B/Soul Single, Female[121][122] Won
Best R&B/Soul or Rap Song of the Year[121][123] Nominated

Billboard Magazine Year-End Charts[edit]

1996 The Year in Music Year-End Charts[edit]

Year Category Work Position
1996 Top Pop Artists[124] three charted singles & albums (Whitney Houston) #41
Top Billboard 200 Albums[125] Waiting to Exhale Original Soundtrack Album #4
Hot 100 Singles Artists[126] three charted singles (Whitney Houston) #8
Hot 100 Singles[127] "You're Makin' Me High"/"Let It Flow" (performed by Toni Braxton) #9
"Exhale (Shoop Shoop)" (performed by Whitney Houston) #14
"Sittin' Up in My Room" (performed by Brandy) #16
"Not Gon' Cry" (performed by Mary J. Blige) #32
"Count on Me" (performed by Whitney Houston & CeCe Winans) #48
Hot 100 Singles Artists – Female[128] three charted singles (Whitney Houston) #5
Hot 100 Singles Producers[128] fourteen charted singles (Babyface) #1
Hot 100 Singles Sales[129] "You're Makin' Me High"/"Let It Flow" #6
"Exhale (Shoop Shoop)" #7
"Sittin' Up in My Room" #15
"Not Gon' Cry" #19
"Count on Me" #28
Hot 100 Singles Airplay[129] "Sittin' Up in My Room" #21
"Exhale (Shoop Shoop)" #31
"Not Gon' Cry" #66
Top R&B Artists[130] three charted singles & albums (Whitney Houston) #28
Top R&B Artists – Female[130] three charted singles & albums (Whitney Houston) #7
Top R&B Albums[131] Waiting to Exhale Original Soundtrack Album #2
Hot R&B Singles Artist[58] three charted singels (Whitney Houston) #8
Hot R&B Singles[58] "You're Makin' Me High"/"Let It Flow" #1
"Sittin' Up in My Room" #8
"Not Gon' Cry" #13
"Exhale (Shoop Shoop)" #18
"Count on Me" #35
"Why Does It Hurt So Bad" (performed by Whitney Houston) #90
Hot R&B Singles Producer[132][133] seventeen charted singles (Babyface) #1
Hot R&B Singles Sales[132] "You're Makin' Me High"/"Let It Flow" #6
"Not Gon' Cry" #14
"Exhale (Shoop Shoop)" #16
"Sittin' Up in My Room" #23
"Count on Me" #54
Hot R&B Singles Airplay[132] "Sittin' Up in My Room" #8
"Not Gon' Cry" #9
"Exhale (Shoop Shoop)" #21
"Let It Flow" #22
"Count on Me" #33
Hot 100 Singles Songwriter[134] thirteen charted singles (Babyface) #1
Hot R&B Singles Songwriter[134] seventeen charted singles (Babyface) #1
Hot Dance Music Maxi-Singles Sales[135] "You're Makin' Me High"/"Let It Flow" #7
Hot Adult Contemporary Artist[11] three charted singles (Whitney Houston) #8
Hot Adult Contemporary Singles & Tracks[11] "Exhale (Shoop Shoop)" #16
Top Soundtrack Albums[11] Waiting to Exhale Original Soundtrack Album #1

1999 The Year in Music Totally '90s: Diary of a Decade[edit]

Category Work Position
Top Pop Albums of the '90s[82] Waiting to Exhale Original Soundtrack Album #61
Hot 100 Singles of the 90s[82] "Exhale (Shoop Shoop)" (performed by Whitney Houston) #52

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c Greg Kot (December 21, 1995). "'Waiting To Exhale' Long On Noble Notions". Chicago Tribune. Retrieved August 28, 2010. 
  2. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k "1997 39th Grammy Awards Nominees & Winners". rockonthenet.com. February 26, 1997. Retrieved June 17, 2010. 
  3. ^ Geoff Mayfield (December 2, 1995). "Billboard magazine, Between the Bullets: Meet the New Boss". Billboard. Retrieved August 28, 2010. 
  4. ^ Neil Strauss (November 30, 2010). "The Pop Life: Gift Sales, Hot and Tepid". The New York Times. Retrieved August 28, 2010. 
  5. ^ Billboard Top R&B Albums chart listing for the week of December 2, 1995. December 2, 1995. Retrieved August 28, 1995. 
  6. ^ a b c "Billboard Top R&B Albums chart listing for the week of February 24, 1996". Billboard. February 24, 1996. Retrieved August 29, 2010. 
  7. ^ Geoff Mayfield (January 20, 1996). "Billboard magazine, Between the Bullets: Adjustment". Billboard. Retrieved August 28, 2010. 
  8. ^ "Billboard 200 chart listing for the week of February 17, 1996". Billboard. February 17, 1996. Retrieved August 29, 2010. 
  9. ^ "Billboard 200 chart listing for the week of February 10, 1996". Billboard. February 10, 1996. Retrieved August 29, 2010. 
  10. ^ "Billboard Top R&B/Hip-Hop Albums chart listing for the week of February 10, 1996". Billboard. February 10, 1996. Retrieved August 29, 2010. 
  11. ^ a b c d "Billboard 1996 The Year in Music, Year-End Chart listing of Hot Adult Contemporary Artists, Hot Adult Contemporary Singles & Tracks and Top Soundtrack Albums". Billboard. December 28, 1996. Retrieved August 26, 2010. 
  12. ^ a b "NARM Grants Sales And Ad Awards, Scholarships". Billboard. April 13, 1996. Retrieved July 3, 2010. 
  13. ^ a b c d e f g h "Waiting to Exhale Soundtrack, RIAA Certification". RIAA. September 4, 1996. Retrieved 2010-06-13. 
  14. ^ a b "Waiting to Exhale Soundtrack sales according to Nielsen SoundScan". Billboard. Retrieved 2010-06-13. 
  15. ^ a b c Craig Lytle. "Waiting to Exhale Soundtrack: allmusic review". Allmusic.com. Retrieved August 28, 2010. 
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