Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center
Wfbmclogo.svg
Geography
Location Winston-Salem, North Carolina, United States
Organization
Hospital type Teaching
Affiliated university Wake Forest University
Services
Emergency department Level I
Helipad (FAA LID: 5NC7)
Beds 885 licensed beds
History
Founded 1902 as Bowman Gray School of Medicine
1923 as North Carolina Baptist Hospital
1997 as Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center
Links
Website www.wakehealth.edu
Lists Hospitals in North Carolina
WFBMC Aerial image.jpg

Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center is an academic medical center located in Winston-Salem, North Carolina. It is the largest employer in Forsyth County with more than 13,000 employees and a total of 172 buildings on 446 acres (180 ha). The entity includes:

  • Wake Forest Baptist Health, its clinical enterprise
  • Wake Forest School of Medicine, its teaching and research arm
  • Wake Forest Innovations, an operating division that drives innovation through partnerships, education, licensing and start-ups.

The medical center is ranked for 2014-15 by U.S. News & World Report as among the nation’s best hospitals in four areas: Cancer, Ear, Nose & Throat, Nephrology and Pulmonology. It is ranked as high performing in eight additional adult specialties: Cardiology and Heart Surgery, Diabetes and Endocrinology, Gastroenterology and GI Surgery, Geriatrics, Gynecology, Neurology and Neurosurgery, Orthopedics and Urology. Brenner Children's Hospital, a 160-bed "hospital within a hospital" at the medical center, is ranked in two pediatric categories by U.S. News & World Report: Neonatology and Orthopedics.[1] Also in 2014, Becker’s Hospital Review named Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center to its annual list of “100 Great Hospitals in America.’’ Wake Forest Baptist was specifically cited for its quality and safety measures.[2]

History[edit]

Wake Forest College Medical School was founded as a two-year medical school on the campus of Wake Forest College in Wake Forest, N.C., in 1902. North Carolina Baptist Hospital was established in 1923 as an 88-bed community hospital in Winston-Salem. The will of a president of R.J. Reynolds Tobacco Co. gave about $750,000 to move the medical school to Winston-Salem and make it a four-year institution. Named after its benefactor, Bowman Gray School of Medicine opened in Winston-Salem in 1941, affiliating with N.C. Baptist Hospital to create "the Miracle on Hawthorne Hill."

Brenner Children's Hospital, a 160-bed "hospital within a hospital," opened in 1986. In 1997, the institutions realigned as Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center. In 2011, as part of the institution's move to become a unified structure, the corporate entity was rebranded as Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center. Clinical operations throughout a 24-county service area in northwest North Carolina and southwest Virginia now fall under the umbrella of Wake Forest Baptist Health, and the academic component is now known as Wake Forest School of Medicine.[3]

Services[edit]

The hospital is a Level 1 trauma center serving the entire Piedmont region of North Carolina. It also houses North Carolina's only Level 1 Pediatric Trauma Center, as well as a pediatric Emergency Department, and pediatric and neonatal intensive-care units.[4] It is also home to AirCare, the hospital's critical care transport service that operates both ground ambulances and a helicopter at the critical care level.[5]

WFBMC AirCare image.jpg

Wake Forest School of Medicine closely aligns its academic and research missions with clinical work, providing patients with leading-edge technology and clinical trials.

The Wake Forest Innovations division operates Wake Forest Innovation Quarter, a mixed-use center in downtown Winston-Salem that is a hub for some of the world's foremost biomedical science and information technology research. A key tenant in the park is the Wake Forest Institute for Regenerative Medicine (WFIRM), which is working to engineer replacement tissues and organs and develop healing cell therapies for more than 30 different areas of the body.

Wake Forest Baptist Health operates 16 free-standing, outpatient dialysis centers, which are located throughout the Triad and the Western Piedmont region, allowing patients to access dialysis services close to home; it is the largest academically owned and operated dialysis operation in the country. In 2012, a Joslin Diabetes Center opened at one of Wake Forest Baptist Health's locations in Winston-Salem, offering multidisciplinary care to diabetes patients; Joslin is an affiliate of Harvard Medical School, an international leader in diabetes research, care and education. Wake Forest Baptist Health also operates a network of subsidiaries and affiliate hospitals including Wake Forest Baptist Health—Lexington Medical Center, a 94-bed acute-care facility in Lexington, N.C., and Wake Forest Baptist Health—Davie Medical Center, which includes a 25-bed inpatient hospital in Mocksville, N.C., and an outpatient campus in Bermuda Run, N.C., featuring a 24/7 emergency department, imaging and diagnostic services, and various specialty health and medical offices.[1]

Childress Institute for Pediatric Trauma[edit]

The Childress Institute for Pediatric Trauma was established in 2008 through a donation by Richard Childress and his wife Judy.[6] The Institute’s mission is to lead national efforts to reduce death and disability following injury to children less than 18 years old.[7] Pediatric trauma is the No. 1 killer of children ages 1–18 in America. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), nearly 10,000 children die each year – more than all other causes combined.[8] The Childress Institute, located at Wake Forest Innovation Quarter, is focused on funding research and medical education throughout the U.S. to improve treatment, as well as raising public awareness about the magnitude of pediatric trauma.[9]

Library and archives[edit]

The School of Medicine's Coy C. Carpenter Library and Dorothy Carpenter Medical Archives are named after the first dean of the school, Coy Cornelius Carpenter, M.D., and his wife, Dorothy (Mitten) Carpenter. The library and archives support clinical missions, educational research, staff and patrons of the Medical Center.[10][11]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Fact Book 2014. Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center. 2014. 
  2. ^ "100 Great Hospitals". Becker's Hospital Review. 
  3. ^ "Our History". Wake Forest Baptist Health. Retrieved 2011-03-22. 
  4. ^ "Level 1 Trauma Center Designation is Renewed". Wake Forest Baptist Health. Retrieved 2011-03-22. 
  5. ^ "About AirCare". Wake Forest Baptist Health. Retrieved 2011-03-22. 
  6. ^ "The Childress Commitment". 
  7. ^ "Childress Institute for Pediatric Trauma's Mission". 
  8. ^ "CDC statistics". 
  9. ^ "Childress Institute for Pediatric Trauma mission". 
  10. ^ Wake Forest University School of Medicine: The Coy C. Carpenter Library, http://www.wfubmc.edu/Library/About-the-Library.htm; and Dorothy Carpenter Medical Archives, http://ewake.wfubmc.edu:88/library/archives/about.html, last updated 7/26/2010.
  11. ^ The A. N. Marquis Company: Who's Who in the South and Southwest, Chicago, Ill., 1952, p. 128.

Coordinates: 36°05′25″N 80°16′11″W / 36.0904119°N 80.2697653°W / 36.0904119; -80.2697653