Waldoboro, Maine

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Waldoboro
Town
Preparing schooner Governor Ames for launch, 1888
Preparing schooner Governor Ames for launch, 1888
Motto: "Home Of The Five Masted Schooner"[1][2]
Waldoboro is located in Maine
Waldoboro
Waldoboro
Location within the state of Maine
Coordinates: 44°6′5″N 69°23′23″W / 44.10139°N 69.38972°W / 44.10139; -69.38972Coordinates: 44°6′5″N 69°23′23″W / 44.10139°N 69.38972°W / 44.10139; -69.38972
Country United States
State Maine
County Lincoln
Incorporated June 29, 1773[3]
Area[4]
 • Total 78.86 sq mi (204.25 km2)
 • Land 71.50 sq mi (185.18 km2)
 • Water 7.36 sq mi (19.06 km2)
Population (2010)[5]
 • Total 5,075
 • Estimate (2012[6]) 5,027
 • Density 71.0/sq mi (27.4/km2)
Time zone Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST) EDT (UTC-4)
Website http://www.waldoboromaine.org/

Waldoboro is a town in Lincoln County, Maine, in the United States. The population was 5,075 at the 2010 census. Waldoboro is a fishing town.

History[edit]

Friendship Street c. 1920

In 1629 the area that would become Waldoboro was granted to John Beauchamp of London and John Leverett of Boston and was known as the Muscongus Patent. The patent lay dormant until 1719 when Leverett’s great-grandson, John Leverett, President of Harvard College, revived the ancient claim and formed the Lincolnshire Proprietors, also known as the Ten Proprietors, so named for the ten shares distributed, one to each member. General Samuel Waldo of Boston acquired a controlling interest in the patent in 1729 and it henceforward become known as the Waldo Patent.[7][8]

First called Broad Bay, the village was settled between 1733 and 1740, but suffered a devastating attack by Indians allied with New France during King George's War. Houses were burned and inhabitants killed or carried away as captives. Survivors fled to the nearby settlements of St. George or Pemaquid. Peace returned with the 1748 Treaty of Aix-la-Chapelle.[9]

In 1752-1753, Samuel Waldo, son of the general, visited Germany and recruited about 1,500 immigrants. Some were followers of Martin Luther and Huldrych Zwingli but they did not immigrate for religious reasons like the Pilgrims but for "...increasing their worldly goods.",[10] most from the Rhineland.[citation needed] Waldo hired Sebastian Zouberbuhler as an agent. Many settled on the western side of Broad Bay, although in 1763-1764 the land was claimed under the Pemaquid Patent. About 300 residents moved to the Moravian settlements in what is now Forsyth County, North Carolina, but the remainder bought their properties. On June 29, 1773, the township was incorporated as Waldoborough, named for the original proprietor.[2][3][9]

Waldoboro became county seat of Lincoln County in 1786, but the designation would shift to Wiscasset in 1880. Farms produced hay and potatoes. The Knox and Lincoln Railroad arrived and spurred the town's development. Industries would include an iron foundry, an oakum mill, a carding and cloth-dressing mill, a grain mill, sawmills and planing mills, furniture and molding mills, a door, sash and blind factory, and a carriage factory. There were also marble and granite yards and a pottery. But ship building was the principal business, with eight large vessels built in 1880.[11] Waldoboro was the launching port for the Governor Ames in 1888, the first five masted schooner.[12] The Governor Ames was built in Waldoboro's Leavitt Storer Shipyard.[13] A port of entry, the town features an 1857 custom house designed by Ammi B. Young.

Waldoboro is also known for the Waldoboro style of hooked rugs,[14] the Waldoboro green neck turnip,[15] Moody's Diner and Morse's Saurkraut,[16] and Fawcetts Toy Museum.[17]

Places listed on the National Register of Historic Places[edit]

Waldoboro fire hand-pumper Triumph and hose reel. This image is available from the New York Public Library's Digital Library under the digital ID G89F253_015F

Geography[edit]

According to the United States Census Bureau, the town has a total area of 78.86 square miles (204.25 km2), of which, 71.50 square miles (185.18 km2) of it is land and 7.36 square miles (19.06 km2) is water.[4] Waldoboro is located at the head of navigation on the Medomak River.

Demographics[edit]

See also: Waldoboro (CDP), Maine

1857 Custom House and Post Office, as it appeared c. 1908

2010 census[edit]

As of the census[5] of 2010, there were 5,075 people, 2,171 households, and 1,364 families residing in the town. The population density was 71.0 inhabitants per square mile (27.4/km2). There were 2,651 housing units at an average density of 37.1 per square mile (14.3/km2). The racial makeup of the town was 97.4% White, 0.4% African American, 0.5% Native American, 0.4% Asian, 0.2% from other races, and 1.1% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 1.0% of the population.

There were 2,171 households of which 28.5% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 46.9% were married couples living together, 11.6% had a female householder with no husband present, 4.3% had a male householder with no wife present, and 37.2% were non-families. 29.7% of all households were made up of individuals and 12.9% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.34 and the average family size was 2.85.

The median age in the town was 43.5 years. 21.8% of residents were under the age of 18; 7% were between the ages of 18 and 24; 23.2% were from 25 to 44; 30.5% were from 45 to 64; and 17.5% were 65 years of age or older. The gender makeup of the town was 49.3% male and 50.7% female.

2000 census[edit]

As of the census[19] of 2000, there were 4,916 people, 1,983 households, and 1,348 families residing in the town. The population density was 69.1 people per square mile (26.7/km²). There were 2,360 housing units at an average density of 33.1 per square mile (12.8/km²). The racial makeup of the town was 98.62% White, 0.22% Black or African American, 0.14% Native American, 0.43% Asian, 0.08% Pacific Islander, 0.04% from other races, and 0.47% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 0.26% of the population.

There were 1,983 households out of which 31.2% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 54.5% were married couples living together, 9.6% had a female householder with no husband present, and 32.0% were non-families. 25.7% of all households were made up of individuals and 11.4% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.45 and the average family size was 2.91.

Old German Lutheran Church, built 1792, as it appeared c. 1905

In the town the population was spread out with 25.3% under the age of 18, 6.6% from 18 to 24, 26.7% from 25 to 44, 25.0% from 45 to 64, and 16.4% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 40 years. For every 100 females there were 96.1 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 90.9 males.

The median income for a household in the town was $34,830, and the median income for a family was $41,042. Males had a median income of $30,788 versus $22,462 for females. The per capita income for the town was $17,117. About 9.7% of families and 12.9% of the population were below the poverty line, including 13.6% of those under age 18 and 12.6% of those age 65 or over.

Infrastructure[edit]

Transportation[edit]

The town is served by U.S. Route 1, and state routes 32, 220 and 235.

Waldoboro Baptist Church, now Congregational, before windows and bell tower changed. Fire cistern under construction.

Notable people[edit]

View of Waldoboro looking NE across Mill Street, the upper falls and Elm Street. Original source: Robert N. Dennis collection of stereoscopic views.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "The Town of Waldoboro Maine". The Town of Waldoboro Maine. Retrieved September 29, 2012. 
  2. ^ a b "Profile for Waldoboro, Maine, ME". ePodunk. Retrieved September 29, 2012. 
  3. ^ a b "Waldoboro, Maine". City-Data.com. Retrieved September 29, 2012. 
  4. ^ a b "US Gazetteer files 2010". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2012-12-16. 
  5. ^ a b "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2012-12-16. 
  6. ^ "Population Estimates". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2013-07-06. 
  7. ^ R.H. Howard and Henry E. Crocker, ed., A History of New England: Containing Historical and Descriptive Sketches of the Counties, Cities, and Principal Towns of the Six New England States, Vol. 2, Maine, New Hampshire, and Vermont (Boston: Crocker and Company, Publishers, 1881), p. 122.
  8. ^ Joseph Williamson, “Brigadier-General Samuel Waldo,” Collections of the Maine Historical Society, Vol. IX (Portland: Maine Historical Society, 1887), p. 77.
  9. ^ a b Coolidge, Austin J.; John B. Mansfield (1859). A History and Description of New England. Boston, Massachusetts. pp. 335–337. 
  10. ^ Bliss, George. The centennial celebration of the incorporation of Waldoboro', Maine, July 4, 1873. Bangor: G. Bliss, 1873. 12. Print. http://books.google.com/books?id=aKsTAAAAYAAJ
  11. ^ George J. Varney, History of Waldoborough, Maine; Boston, Massachusetts 1886
  12. ^ Maine League of Historical Societies and Museums (1970). Doris A. Isaacson, ed. Maine: A Guide 'Down East'. Rockland, Me: Courier-Gazette, Inc. p. 259. 
  13. ^ Preparing the Governor Ames for Launching, Leavitt-Storer Shipyard, Waldoboro, 1888, Maine Memory Network
  14. ^ Hansen, Jacqueline, and Trudy Brown. Sculptured rugs in Waldoboro style. Mechanicsburg, PA: Rug Hooking, 2007. Print. isbn=1881982572
  15. ^ Nabhan, Gary Paul, Ashley Rood, and Deborah Madison. Renewing America's food traditions: saving and savoring the continent's most endangered foods. White River Junction, Vt.: Chelsea Green Pub. Co., 2008. 128. Print.
  16. ^ Sample, Tim, and Steve Bither. Maine curiosities quirky characters, roadside oddities & other offbeat stuff. 3rd ed. Guildford, Conn.: Globe Pequot Press, 2011. 276-278. Print.
  17. ^ Theunissen, Amanda, and Mark Sullivan eds.. Maine Coast. 2nd ed. New York: Fodor's, 2008. 114. Print.
  18. ^ http://www.nps.gov/nr/research/
  19. ^ "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  20. ^ "BROWN, Benjamin, (1756 - 1831)". Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. Retrieved September 29, 2012. 
  21. ^ "Sergeant Tristan Dyer". Pattillmanfoundation. Retrieved September 29, 2012. 
  22. ^ "PAYNE, Frederick George, (1904 - 1978)". Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. Retrieved September 29, 2012. 
  23. ^ "REED, Isaac, (1809 - 1887)". Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. Retrieved September 29, 2012. 
  24. ^ "Augusta Emma Stetson". Find A Grave. Retrieved September 29, 2012. 
  25. ^ Clyde Sukeforth, 98, Is Dead; Steered Robinson to Majors

External links[edit]