Walk of shame

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The walk of shame refers to a situation in which a person must walk past strangers or peers alone for an embarrassing reason before reaching a place of privacy. Most commonly,[citation needed] it occurs the morning after a night out at a bar, nightclub, or party. People undertaking the walk of shame are understood to have spent the night at the residence of a sexual partner (or perceived sexual partner), particularly a one-night stand.[1][2][3][4][5][6] The topic is often the subject of college newspaper commentary.[7][8] The "walker" may often be identified by his or her disheveled appearance and incongruous evening attire, particularly on Saturday or Sunday mornings.

Other uses[edit]

In reality television programs like The Weakest Link, Fear Factor and Survivor, America's Got Talent, etc. the "walk of shame" describes an eliminated contestant's departure from the competition.

In association football (soccer), the walk of shame refers to a player receiving a red card and being sent off the field of play.[9] The player must return directly to the changing rooms for an early bath thus enduring the walk of shame, suffering the inevitable taunts from opposition supporters.

In American baseball, the walk of shame can refer to one of several scenarios:

  • a batter walking back to the dugout after striking out.
  • a runner being thrown out going for extra bases or caught stealing.
  • a pitcher being replaced after poor performance such as walking a batter or allowing a home run.
  • a player or team manager being ejected.

In all these scenarios, the player involved walks back to his team's dugout. In the latter two, the player usually goes directly to the locker room.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Lunceford, Brett (October 1, 2008). "The walk of shame: a normative description". ETC: A Review of General Semantics. Retrieved February 10, 2010. ("This essay considers how the descriptor "walk of shame" functions to discipline female sexual practice by reinforcing gender stereotypes and punishing women who transgress socially constructed norms.")
  2. ^ Paul, Elizabeth J. Beer Googles, Catching Feelings, and the Walk of Shame: The Myths and Realities of the Hookup Experience, in Kirkpatrick, Dan Charles et al. (ed.), Relating Difficulty: The Processes of Constructing And Managing Difficult Interaction (2008) (ISBN 978-0805854121)
  3. ^ Morrison, Sarah (February 2002). "When I Did the Walk of Shame". Cosmopolitan (magazine). Retrieved February 10, 2010. ("Whether you've woken up after a one-night stand with a drool-worthy stud or found yourself at your boyfriend's pad following an impromptu night of passion, sooner or later, every girl has had to face the harsh reality of that torturous trek home.")
  4. ^ "Turn Walk of Shame into Walk of Pride". Chicago Tribune. December 2, 2005. Retrieved February 10, 2010. ("Tracy Tedesco, 41, insists that the Walk of Shame has a new meaning after a certain age. She refers to it as the Walk of Pride...")
  5. ^ Matt White (October 23, 1994). "L.A. SPEAK Frat Chat". Los Angeles Times. Retrieved February 10, 2010. ("The long morning walk home to a fraternity or sorority house in the same clothes worn to a party the night before")
  6. ^ Leigh Pressley (April 23, 1992). "Colorful Language: Groups Adopt Buzzwords That Set Them Apart". Star-News. Retrieved February 10, 2010. [dead link](referring to "walk of shame" as a college group term")
  7. ^ Nate Widboom (April 14, 2004). "The walk of shame". The Badger Herald. Retrieved February 10, 2010. 
  8. ^ Sara Chemodurow (February 7, 2010). "The ‘walk of shame’ only hurts your image". The Daily Evergreen. Retrieved February 10, 2010. 
  9. ^ "Laws of the Game". fifa.com. Retrieved June 6, 2008. 

Further reading[edit]

External links[edit]