Walker Center

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Walker Bank Building
Walker Center.jpg
Night view of the Walker Center
Walker Center is located in Utah
Walker Center
Location 175 S. Main St., Salt Lake City, Utah
Coordinates 40°45′55″N 111°53′24″W / 40.76528°N 111.89000°W / 40.76528; -111.89000Coordinates: 40°45′55″N 111°53′24″W / 40.76528°N 111.89000°W / 40.76528; -111.89000
Built 1911
Architect Eames and Young; Stewart, James & Co.
Architectural style Skyscraper
Governing body Private
NRHP Reference # 06000929[1]
Added to NRHP October 04, 2006

Walker Center (formerly Walker Bank Building) is a skyscraper in Salt Lake City, Utah, United States. It was opened on December 9, 1912; taking a little over a year to be built. At the time of its completion, it stood as the tallest building between Chicago and San Francisco (16 stories, 67 m). It was originally constructed as the headquarters for Walker Bank, founded by the Walker brothers: Samuel, Joseph, David, and Matthew. The basement originally contained the vault for the bank, as well as a barbershop, florist, cigar store, and other shops. The main floor contained the bank, and upper floors were used as office space.[2] It was designed by the St. Louis, Missouri-based architecture firm Eames and Young.[3]

Weather Tower[edit]

The Walker Center is topped by a 64-foot weather tower, which gives a weather forecast based on the color of the lights. The weather tower was taken down in the 1980s due to a city ordinance but replaced in 2008. The meaning of the tower colors are:

  • blue: clear skies
  • flashing blue: cloudy skies
  • red: rain
  • flashing red: snow[4]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ "National Register Information System". National Register of Historic Places. National Park Service. 2009-03-13. 
  2. ^ Merchants and miners in Utah : the Walker brothers and their bank / Jonathan Bliss.[Salt Lake City, Utah] : Western Epics, c1983.
  3. ^ http://luna.wustl.edu:8180/luna/servlet/detail/EY~16~7~117847~110837:Walker-Bank-Building-for-the-M--H--
  4. ^ "Historic weather tower lights up skyline". KSL. March 21, 2009. 

External links[edit]

Preceded by
Joseph Smith Memorial Building
Tallest Building in Salt Lake City
1912 - 1916
67m
Succeeded by
Utah State Capitol