Walker Pass

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Walker Pass
SR178 5000 Elevation.jpg
The approach to Walker Pass
Elevation 5,250 ft (1,600 m)
Traversed by State Route 178
Location Sierra Crest, Kern County, California, US
Range Sierra Nevada
Coordinates 35°39′47″N 118°01′37″W / 35.66306°N 118.02694°W / 35.66306; -118.02694Coordinates: 35°39′47″N 118°01′37″W / 35.66306°N 118.02694°W / 35.66306; -118.02694
Walker Pass is located in California
Walker Pass
Nearest city Ridgecrest, California
Built 1834
Governing body Bureau of Land Management
NRHP Reference # 66000210[1]
CHISL # 99
Significant dates
Added to NRHP October 15, 1966[1]
Designated NHL July 4, 1961[2]

Walker Pass (el. 5,250 ft (1,600 m)) is a mountain pass by Lake Isabella in the southern Sierra Nevada mountains. It is located in northeastern Kern County, approximately 53 mi (85 km) ENE of Bakersfield and 10 mi (16 km) WNW of Ridgecrest. The pass provides a route between the San Joaquin Valley on the west and the Mojave Desert on the east.

Walker Pass is a National Historic Landmark, and is under the stewardship of the Bureau of Land Management.

History[edit]

Walker Pass was charted as route through the Sierra in 1834 by Joseph R. Walker and Garland Guthary, members of the Bonneville Expedition who learned of it from Native Americans. Walker returned through the pass in 1843, leading an immigrant wagon train into California. In 1845 the military surveying expedition of John C. Fremont used the pass. He suggested it be named after Walker.[3][4]

Description[edit]

It is the highest point on State Route 178. Aside from the paved road, the pass is essentially unaltered since Walker mapped it in 1834.[3]

Between Walker Pass and Tioga Pass, several hours drive to the north, there is only one paved road for automobiles to cross over the Sierra Nevada mountains, Sherman Pass (California). All roads between Walker Pass and Carson Pass (State Route 88), over 200 miles (320 km) in distance, are subject to extended closure by winter snowfall. Walker Pass is sometimes closed due to snowfall, but due to its lower elevation these closures are for brief periods.

Walker Pass can also be closed, especially during winter, due to rock falls. Road conditions are reported by Caltrans or local radio stations. Rock slides and falling rocks are a danger, and care should be taken at all times of the year. Highway 178 is a narrow, twisting two lane road for most its entire length through the Sierras. For this reason, most east-west traffic utilizes the four lane State Route 58 through Tehachapi Pass, located about one hour's drive to the south.

The Pacific Crest Trail crosses at Walker Pass, and northbound thru-hikers can look forward to the longest roadless stretch of the entire trail.

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "National Register Information System". National Register of Historic Places. National Park Service. 2010-07-09. 
  2. ^ NHL Summary
  3. ^ a b Rudo, Mark O. (September 26, 1989). "Walker Pass" (pdf). National Register of Historic Places - Nomination and Inventory. National Park Service. Retrieved 25 May 2012. 
  4. ^ "Walker Pass" (pdf). Photographs. National Park Service. Retrieved 25 May 2012. 

External links[edit]