Walkin' My Baby Back Home (song)

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"Walkin' My Baby Back Home"
Song
Published 1930
Genre Jazz
Language English
Writer Fred E. Ahlert
Roy Turk

"Walkin' My Baby Back Home" is a popular song written in 1930 by Roy Turk (lyrics) and Fred E. Ahlert (music). It first charted in 1931 with versions by Nick Lucas (#8), Ted Weems (also #8), The Charleston Chasers (#15), and Lee Morse (#18).

A recording made by Jo Stafford on November 9, 1945, was released by Capitol Records as catalog number 20049, and on her album, Songs by Jo Stafford (catalog number B-D23).

Harry Richman recorded the song on November 4, 1947. This version was released by Decca Records as catalog number 24391.

A major hit version of it was recorded by Nat King Cole, on September 4, 1951 and released by Capitol Records as catalog number 2130. It went to #8 in 1952. The song charted again in 1952 at #4 in a version recorded in February 1952 by Johnnie Ray, released by Columbia Records as catalog number 39750. Ray's version peaked at number 12 in the UK Singles Chart in November 1952.[1] It was the title song from the 1953 film starring Donald O'Connor, Janet Leigh, Buddy Hackett, and Scatman Crothers.[2] In the film the song was performed by O'Connor.[3]

In 1962, Monica Zetterlund with Georg Riedel's Orchestra recorded a version of this song with Swedish lyrics by Beppe Wolgers entitled Sakta vi gå genom stan (lit. "Slowly we walk through the city"). It is a subtle tribute to Stockholm, and has in recent years been voted the most popular song about the Swedish capital (in a poll by Radio Stockholm). Zetterlund has had a Stockholm park named after her. The song was released on the Philips label.

In 2008, Natalie Cole recorded the song as a virtual duet with her father and it was the first single for her album Still Unforgettable, released on September 9, 2008.

Elvis Costello (with acoustic guitar) performed a version as an encore in his Auckland, New Zealand concert, January 19, 2013 and in Troy, New York on November 6, 2013.

Notable recorded versions[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Roberts, David (2006). British Hit Singles & Albums (19th ed.). London: Guinness World Records Limited. p. 451. ISBN 1-904994-10-5. 
  2. ^ Whitburn, Joel (1973). Top Pop Records 1940-1955. Record Research. 
  3. ^ Walking My Baby Back Home (1953) - Soundtracks from Internet Movie Database