Wall Township, New Jersey

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Wall Township, New Jersey
Township
Township of Wall
Map of Wall Township in Monmouth County. Inset: Location of Monmouth County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Map of Wall Township in Monmouth County. Inset: Location of Monmouth County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Census Bureau map of Wall Township, New Jersey
Census Bureau map of Wall Township, New Jersey
Coordinates: 40°10′02″N 74°05′46″W / 40.1673°N 74.096089°W / 40.1673; -74.096089Coordinates: 40°10′02″N 74°05′46″W / 40.1673°N 74.096089°W / 40.1673; -74.096089[1][2]
Country United States
State New Jersey
County Monmouth
Incorporated March 7, 1851
Government[6]
 • Type Township
 • Mayor Clinton Hoffman (term ends December 31, 2014) [3]
 • Administrator Jeffry Bertrand[4]
 • Clerk Lorraine Kubacz[5]
Area[2]
 • Total 31.737 sq mi (82.198 km2)
 • Land 30.673 sq mi (79.443 km2)
 • Water 1.064 sq mi (2.755 km2)  3.35%
Area rank 79th of 566 in state
7th of 53 in county[2]
Elevation[7] 98 ft (30 m)
Population (2010 Census)[8][9][10]
 • Total 26,164
 • Estimate (2012[11]) 26,084
 • Rank 94th of 566 in state
9th of 53 in county[12]
 • Density 853.0/sq mi (329.3/km2)
 • Density rank 401st of 566 in state
47th of 53 in county[12]
Time zone Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST) Eastern (EDT) (UTC-4)
ZIP codes 07719, 07727, 07731, 07753, 07762, 08724, 08736, 08750[13][14]
Area code(s) 732[15]
FIPS code 3402576460[16][2][17]
GNIS feature ID 0882112[18][2]
Website www.wallnj.com

Wall Township is a township in Monmouth County, New Jersey, United States. As of the 2010 United States Census, the township's population was 26,164,[8][9][10] reflecting an increase of 903 (+3.6%) from the 25,261 counted in the 2000 Census, which had in turn increased by 5,017 (+24.8%) from the 20,244 counted in the 1990 Census.[19]

Wall Township was formally incorporated as a township by an act of the New Jersey Legislature on March 7, 1851. Over the years, portions of the township have been taken to form North Spring Lake (May 1884), Ocean Beach (March 9, 1885, now Belmar), Manasquan (December 30, 1887), Spring Lake, (March 14, 1892), Sea Girt (March 29, 1917), Brielle (April 10, 1919), South Belmar (March 12, 1924, now Lake Como) and Spring Lake Heights (March 19, 1927).[20]

Allenwood (2010 Census population of 925[21]) and West Belmar (2010 population 2,493[22]) are census-designated places and unincorporated communities located within Wall Township.[23][24][25] Glendola is another unincorporated area within the township.

History[edit]

Wall Township was named for General Garret D. Wall (1783-1850), a lawyer who commanded a Trenton volunteer company during the War of 1812 and was stationed at Sandy Hook. Wall served five years as clerk of the New Jersey Supreme Court and as quartermaster general of the state for more than 20 years.[26][27]

The Greenville Cemetery was established in 1734, when the American Legion buried a casualty of the French and Indian War. The original structure of the Glendola Protestant Bible Church was built in 1776; The congregation dedicated a new church in 1964.

Allaire Village dates back to 1822, when James P. Allaire purchased what became known as the Howell Works in Wall, and though it was the largest producing bog iron manufacturing site in New Jersey by 1836, the ironworks were shut down in 1846. The village and surrounding acres were later preserved and gifted to the State of New Jersey to form Allaire State Park as a memorial to Hearst editor Arthur Brisbane, the last private owner of the site, who purchased the land in 1907 and built a palatial residence on that property that would later serve as the Arthur Brisbane Child Treatment Center. The Brisbane family donated the property to the State of New Jersey to establish Allaire State Park and the Historic Village at Allaire. Allaire Village Inc., a non-profit organization, is licensed by the State of New Jersey to operate the site now known as "The Historic Village at Allaire."

The Allgor-Barkalow Homestead at 1701 New Bedford Road was constructed in 1840, although some accounts indicate construction of part of the building began in the 18th century. The building now houses the museum of the Old Wall Historical Society. The Blansingburg schoolhouse at Sea Girt Avenue opened in 1855; The building was relocated in 1999 to the Allgor-Barkalow Homestead Museum property for refurbishing.

Wall Township was formed in 1851, from portions of Howell Township.[20]

The newly formed Marconi Wireless Telegraph Company of America, with its home office in England, purchases a 93-acre (380,000 m2) farm around 1900 that became the site of the company's receiver equipment for commercial transatlantic radio operation. The Marconi signal site was abandoned in 1924, but it was later occupied by the Ku Klux Klan until they were ejected in March 1928. The United States Army purchased the Marconi site in November 1941 and named it Camp Evans.[28][29]

The Allenwood Hospital, located at Squankum and Allenwood Roads, opened in January 1921 as a sanatorium for tuberculosis patients. In 1957, a 16-room building is dedicated to Geraldine L. Thompson, who served as president of the hospital's board of managers. In the 1960s, the facility becomes an annex to the John L. Montgomery Medical Home in Freehold Township, a county-run nursing home, and was renamed the Geraldine L. Thompson Care Center.[30]

In 1940, Edward I. Brown used an old World War I tank converted into a bulldozer to clear land for an airport that he turned into what is now Monmouth Executive Airport after completing his service in the United States Navy as a pilot during World War II; The airport was sold by the Brown family in 2007 to a private equity firm, despite lengthy attempts by Monmouth county to acquire the facility.[31]

The Roadside Diner, formerly the Circle Diner and Rusty's, was delivered to its Route 34 site by the Silk City Diner Co. in the 1940s. The diner was used for filming of a scene for the 1983 movie Baby It's You and appears on the cover of the 1994 Bon Jovi album Cross Road: 14 Classic Grooves, as well as having been featured in the 2008 music video for "Girls in Their Summer Clothes" by Bruce Springsteen.[32][33]

Wall High School opened in September 1959, while Wall Intermediate School opened in 1960 as an 11-room schoolhouse.

Interstate 195 was extended into Wall Township in 1981, giving direct high-speed access to Trenton.

A suit filed by the American Civil Liberties Union in December 1999 against the township over a holiday display that included a nativity scene and a Hannukah menorah, contending that the religious symbols violate the constitutional separation of church and state was dismissed by a judge who ruled that the organization had filed its suit too close to the start of the holiday season.[34] The United States Court of Appeals for the Third Circuit issued a ruling in April 2001 vacating the decision of the district court in the case that the township's holiday display as modified in 2000 to included other seasonal decorations did not violate the Establishment Clause or the New Jersey Constitution and ruling that the ACLU lacked standing to file the case.[35]

Even though many of the surrounding towns sprung out of Wall Township, the only zip code that only refers to areas of Wall is Allenwood, but even it relies solely on a Post-office box system for regular mail services.[36]

Geography[edit]

Wall Township is located at 40°10′02″N 74°05′46″W / 40.1673°N 74.096089°W / 40.1673; -74.096089 (40.1673,-74.096089). According to the United States Census Bureau, the township had a total area of 31.737 square miles (82.198 km2), of which, 30.673 square miles (79.443 km2) of it is land and 1.064 square miles (2.755 km2) of it (3.35%) is water.[2][1]

Wreck Pond is a tidal pond located on the coast of the Atlantic Ocean, surrounded by Wall Township and the boroughs of Spring Lake, Spring Lake Heights, and Sea Girt. The Wreck Pond watershed covers about 12 square miles (31 km2) in eastern Monmouth County.

Wall Township is divided into several communities which include Allaire, Allenwood, Glendola, Old Mill, Manasquan Estates, and West Belmar.

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
1860 2,283
1870 2,671 17.0%
1880 3,829 43.4%
1890 3,269 * −14.6%
1900 3,212 * −1.7%
1910 3,817 18.8%
1920 3,324 * −12.9%
1930 3,540 * 6.5%
1940 4,383 23.8%
1950 7,386 68.5%
1960 11,929 61.5%
1970 16,498 38.3%
1980 18,952 14.9%
1990 20,244 6.8%
2000 25,261 24.8%
2010 26,164 3.6%
Est. 2012 26,084 [11] −0.3%
Population sources: 1860-1920[37]
1860-1870[38] 1870[39] 1880-1890[40]
1890-1910[41] 1910-1930[42]
1900-1990[43] 2000[44][45] 2010[8][9][10]
* = Lost territory in previous decade.[20]

Census 2010[edit]

At the 2010 United States Census, there were 26,164 people, 10,051 households, and 7,066 families residing in the township. The population density was 853.0 per square mile (329.3 /km2). There were 10,883 housing units at an average density of 354.8 per square mile (137.0 /km2). The racial makeup of the township was 93.72% (24,521) White, 2.44% (639) Black or African American, 0.16% (41) Native American, 1.61% (421) Asian, 0.01% (2) Pacific Islander, 0.91% (237) from other races, and 1.16% (303) from two or more races. Hispanics or Latinos of any race were 3.47% (908) of the population.[8]

There were 10,051 households, of which 30.9% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 57.6% were married couples living together, 9.6% had a female householder with no husband present, and 29.7% were non-families. 25.2% of all households were made up of individuals, and 11.6% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.57 and the average family size was 3.11.[8]

In the township, 23.5% of the population were under the age of 18, 6.5% from 18 to 24, 20.0% from 25 to 44, 32.9% from 45 to 64, and 17.1% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 45.0 years. For every 100 females there were 92.2 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 87.7 males.[8]

The Census Bureau's 2006-2010 American Community Survey showed that (in 2010 inflation-adjusted dollars) median household income was $89,278 (with a margin of error of +/- $6,640) and the median family income was $108,865 (+/- $6,748). Males had a median income of $75,198 (+/- $3,706) versus $51,969 (+/- $5,806) for females. The per capita income for the borough was $46,514 (+/- $2,483). About 3.1% of families and 4.1% of the population were below the poverty line, including 4.7% of those under age 18 and 4.5% of those age 65 or over.[46]

Census 2000[edit]

As of the 2000 United States Census[16] there were 25,261 people, 9,437 households, and 6,926 families residing in the township. The population density was 825.1 people per square mile (318.5/km²). There were 9,957 housing units at an average density of 325.2 per square mile (125.6/km²). The racial makeup of the township was 97.09% White, 0.61% African American, 0.10% Native American, 1.26% Asian, 0.04% Pacific Islander, 0.32% from other races, and 0.58% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 1.55% of the population.[44][45]

There were 9,437 households out of which 33.8% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 63.0% were married couples living together, 8.0% had a female householder with no husband present, and 26.6% were non-families. 22.7% of all households were made up of individuals and 9.7% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.64 and the average family size was 3.14.[44][45]

In the township the population was spread out with 25.2% under the age of 18, 5.1% from 18 to 24, 28.4% from 25 to 44, 26.8% from 45 to 64, and 14.4% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 40 years. For every 100 females there were 92.7 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 88.4 males.[44][45]

The 2000 Census showed that median household income for the township was $73,989 and the median family income was $83,795. Males had a median income of $61,022 versus $37,011 for females. The per capita income for the township was $32,954. About 1.7% of families and 2.3% of the population were below the poverty line, including 2.5% of those under age 18 and 2.9% of those age 65 or over.[44][45]

Government[edit]

Local government[edit]

Wall is governed under the Township form of government, which is the oldest form of government in New Jersey, having been first established in 1798, and enhanced by the Township Act of 1989. All committee members are elected in partisan elections to three-year terms of office on an at large basis during the November general election, with either one or two seats up for election each year in a three-year cycle. Each year, at the annual reorganization meeting, the Township Committee selects one of its members to preside as mayor for the year, and another to serve as deputy mayor. It is the only form of government in which the mayor is not elected directly by the voters of the municipality. There are 11 municipalities in Monmouth County using the Township form of government.[6][47]

As of 2014, the members of the Wall Township Committee (with party affiliation and term-end data) are Mayor Clinton C. Hoffman (R, 2016), Deputy Mayor George K. Newberry (R, 2014), Committeeman Todd W. Luttman (R, 2015), Committeewoman Ann Marie Conte (R, 2014), and Committeeman Jeffrey W. Foster (R, 2016).[48][49][50][51]

Public safety[edit]

Wall Township is served by three fire districts, and three first aid squads.[52] Wall Fire Company # 1, the first volunteer fire company to serve the township, was created in December 1909. Today the company remains all volunteer and serves the residents of the West Belmar section of town, also known as Wall Fire District # 1.[53] Glendola Fire Company was formed, also known as Wall Fire District #2, in May 1931. Wall First Aid was formed in September 1939 and is known as Wall Township First Aid & Rescue Squad. South Wall Fire-Rescue, the township's third fire district, was established in 1946. It responds to calls for service in the south end of town. Wall Community First Aid Squad 52-22 was established on November 15, 1960.[54] Wall Township also has a paid EMS squad (52-23) during daytime hours ran by Wall Police.

Federal, state and county representation[edit]

Wall Township is located in the 4th Congressional District[55] and is part of New Jersey's 30th state legislative district.[9][56][57] Prior to the 2011 reapportionment following the 2010 Census, Wall Township had been in the 11th state legislative district.[58]

New Jersey's Fourth Congressional District is represented by Christopher Smith (R).[59] New Jersey is represented in the United States Senate by Cory Booker (D, Newark; took office on October 31, 2013, after winning a special election to fill the seat of Frank Lautenberg)[60][61] and Bob Menendez (D, North Bergen).[62][63]

The 30th District of the New Jersey Legislature is represented in the State Senate by Robert Singer (R, Lakewood Township) and in the General Assembly by Sean T. Kean (R, Wall Township) and Dave Rible (R, Wall Township).[64] The Governor of New Jersey is Chris Christie (R, Mendham Township).[65] The Lieutenant Governor of New Jersey is Kim Guadagno (R, Monmouth Beach).[66]

Monmouth County is governed by a Board of Chosen Freeholders consisting of five members who are elected at-large to serve three year terms of office on a staggered basis, with either one or two seats up for election each year as part of the November general election. At an annual reorganization meeting held in the beginning of January, the board selects one of its members to serve as Director and another as Deputy Director.[67] As of 2014, Monmouth County's Freeholders are Freeholder Director Lillian G. Burry (R, Colts Neck Township; term ends December 31, 2014),[68] Freeholder Deputy Director Gary J. Rich, Sr. (R, Spring Lake; 2014),[69] Thomas A. Arnone (R, Neptune City; 2016),[70] John P. Curley (R, Middletown Township; 2015)[71] and Serena DiMaso (R, Holmdel Township; 2016).[72][73] Constitutional officers elected on a countywide basis are County Clerk M. Claire French (Wall Township),[74] Sheriff Shaun Golden (Farmingdale)[75] and Surrogate Rosemarie D. Peters (Middletown Township).[76]

Politics[edit]

In the 2008 Presidential Election, Republican John McCain received 60.7% of the vote here (9,243 ballots), outpolling Democrat Barack Obama, who received 36.9% (5,607), with 15,215 of 19,601 registered voters participating, for a turnout percentage of 77.6%.[77] In the 2004 Presidential Election, Republican George W. Bush received 64.4% of the vote here (9,434 ballots), outpolling Democrat John Kerry, who received 34.2% (5,013), with 14,648 of 18,748 registered voters participating, for a turnout percentage of 78.1%.[78]

In the 2009 Gubernatorial Election, Republican Chris Christie received 70.0% of the vote (7,695 ballots), ahead of both Democrat Jon Corzine with 23.1% (2,542) and Independent Chris Daggett with 5.5% (604), with 10,994 of 19,085 registered voters participating (turnout of 57.6%).[79]

Politics[edit]

As of March 23, 2011, there were a total of 18,809 registered voters in Wall Township, of which 3,256 (17.3%) were registered as Democrats, 6,373 (33.9%) were registered as Republicans and 9,171 (48.8%) were registered as Unaffiliated. There were 9 voters registered to other parties.[80]

In the 2008 presidential election, Republican John McCain received 60.7% of the vote here (9,243 cast), ahead of Democrat Barack Obama with 36.9% (5,607 votes) and other candidates with 1.1% (172 votes), among the 15,215 ballots cast by the township's 19,601 registered voters, for a turnout of 77.6%.[81] In the 2004 presidential election, Republican George W. Bush received 64.4% of the vote here (9,434 ballots cast), outpolling Democrat John Kerry with 34.2% (5,013 votes) and other candidates with 0.7% (128 votes), among the 14,648 ballots cast by the township's 18,748 registered voters, for a turnout percentage of 78.1.[82]

In the 2009 gubernatorial election, Republican Chris Christie received 70.0% of the vote here (7,695 ballots cast), ahead of Democrat Jon Corzine with 23.1% (2,542 votes), Independent Chris Daggett with 5.5% (604 votes) and other candidates with 0.7% (81 votes), among the 10,994 ballots cast by the township's 19,085 registered voters, yielding a 57.6% turnout.[83]

Transportation[edit]

Heavy traffic on the Garden State Parkway in Wall Township.

Several state routes pass through the township, including Route 18,[84] Route 34 (with its southern terminus at the interchange of Routes 35 and 70),[85] Route 35,[86] Route 70 (which has its eastern terminus at Route 34 and continues towards the east as Route 35)[87] Route 71[88] and Route 138.[89] Two limited access roads also run through: the Garden State Parkway (including interchange 98 for Belmar / Wall)[90][91] and Interstate 195, which ends at Route 34 and continues as Route 138.[92]

Major county roads in the township are CR 524 and CR 547.

New Jersey Transit offers train service on the North Jersey Coast Line at the Belmar, Spring Lake and Manasquan stations. NJ Transit bus service is available between the township and Philadelphia on the 317 route, with local service offered on the 830 and 836 routes.[93]

Education[edit]

The Wall Township Public Schools serve students in kindergarten through twelfth grade. Schools in the district (with 2010-11 enrollment data from the National Center for Education Statistics[94]) are Wall Primary School for the district's preschool disabled children[95] (48 students), four K-5 elementary schools — Allenwood Elementary School[96] (409), Central Elementary School[97] (556), Old Mill Elementary School[98] (481) and West Belmar Elementary School[99] (211) — Wall Intermediate School[100] (1,045) for grades 6–8; and Wall High School[101] (1,339) for grades 9–12.[102]

Notable people[edit]

Notable current and former residents of Wall Township include:

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. Retrieved 2011-04-23. 
  2. ^ a b c d e f County Subdivisions: New Jersey - 2010 Census Gazetteer Files, United States Census Bureau. Accessed July 9, 2013.
  3. ^ 2013 New Jersey Mayors Directory, New Jersey Department of Community Affairs. Accessed May 13, 2013.
  4. ^ Township Directory, Wall Township. Accessed August 9, 2012.
  5. ^ Clerk's Office, Wall Township. Accessed August 9, 2012.
  6. ^ a b 2012 New Jersey Legislative District Data Book, Rutgers University Edward J. Bloustein School of Planning and Public Policy, March 2013, p. 67.
  7. ^ U.S. Geological Survey Geographic Names Information System: Township of Wall, Geographic Names Information System. Accessed March 14, 2013.
  8. ^ a b c d e f DP-1 - Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 for Wall township, Monmouth County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed August 9, 2012.
  9. ^ a b c d Municipalities Grouped by 2011-2020 Legislative Districts, New Jersey Department of State, p. 13. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  10. ^ a b c Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: 2010 for Wall township, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development. Accessed August 9, 2012.
  11. ^ a b PEPANNRES - Annual Estimates of the Resident Population: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2012 - 2012 Population Estimates for New Jersey municipalities, United States Census Bureau. Accessed July 7, 2013.
  12. ^ a b GCT-PH1 Population, Housing Units, Area, and Density: 2010 - State -- County Subdivision from the 2010 Census Summary File 1 for New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed September 19, 2012.
  13. ^ Look Up a ZIP Code for Wall, NJ, United States Postal Service. Accessed August 9, 2012.
  14. ^ Zip Codes, State of New Jersey. Accessed October 28, 2013.
  15. ^ Area Code Lookup - NPA NXX for Wall, NJ, Area-Codes.com. Accessed October 28, 2013.
  16. ^ a b "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  17. ^ A Cure for the Common Codes: New Jersey, Missouri Census Data Center. Accessed August 9, 2012.
  18. ^ "US Board on Geographic Names". United States Geological Survey. 2007-10-25. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  19. ^ Table 7. Population for the Counties and Municipalities in New Jersey: 1990, 2000 and 2010, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development, February 2011. Accessed August 9, 2012.
  20. ^ a b c Snyder, John P. The Story of New Jersey's Civil Boundaries: 1606–1968, Bureau of Geology and Topography; Trenton, New Jersey; 1969. p. 186–187. Accessed January 22, 2012.
  21. ^ DP-1 - Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 Demographic Profile Data for Allenwood CDP, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed August 9, 2012.
  22. ^ DP-1 - Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 Demographic Profile Data for West Belmar CDP, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed August 9, 2012.
  23. ^ GCT-PH1 - Population, Housing Units, Area, and Density: 2010 - County -- County Subdivision and Place from the 2010 Census Summary File 1 for Monmouth County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed December 13, 2012.
  24. ^ 2006-2010 American Community Survey Geography for New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed December 13, 2012.
  25. ^ New Jersey: 2010 - Population and Housing Unit Counts - 2010 Census of Population and Housing (CPH-2-32), United States Census Bureau, August 2012. Accessed December 13, 2012.
  26. ^ Harnes, John A. "Book offers glimpses of Wall history Glimpses of Wall history", Asbury Park Press, July 27, 1999. Accessed December 13, 2012.
  27. ^ a b c Carney, Leo H. "WALL: A TOWNSHIP OF MANY FACES", The New York Times, January 3, 1988. Accessed January 22, 2012. "Among its 20th-century residents have been the Italian electrical engineer and inventor Guglielmo Marconi and Russell L. Schweickart, one of the Apollo 9 astronauts."
  28. ^ Carney, Leo H. "WALL: A TOWNSHIP OF MANY FACES", The New York Times, January 3, 1988. Accessed October 28, 2013. "Marconi is believed to have lived in Shark River Hills from 1913 to 1924, after which time he joined the Radio Corporation of America.After he left, Mrs. Salmon said, his home was occupied by the regional Grand Wizard of the Ku Klux Klan. The Klan, she said, infiltrated and manipulated Shore communities."
  29. ^ a b Salmon, Alyce H. In-Depth History, Wall Township. Accessed September 1, 2008.
  30. ^ Department of the Month Monmouth County Care Centers, Monmouth County, New Jersey. Accessed October 28, 2013. "There are two state-licensed care centers in Monmouth County, the Geraldine L. Thompson Care Center in Wall, and the John L. Montgomery Care Center in Freehold Township.... In the following decades, the facility was known as the Allenwood Hospital and it became a model institution for the care and treatment of TB patients.... Shortly after Thompson’s death the facility was renamed the Geraldine L. Thompson Care Center where it continues to serve residents."
  31. ^ Zomack, Dan. "Airport sold to private equity firm", The Coast Star, August 16, 2007. Accessed October 28, 2013. "After years of negotiations with Monmouth County government officials, Monmouth Executive Airport was finally sold by the Brown family — but not to the county. The airport has been sold to a private equity group based in North Jersey. Monmouth County Spokesman William Heine confirmed this week that Monmouth Executive Airport in Wall Township has been sold to Onyx Equities of Woodbridge."
  32. ^ Genovese, Peter. "Coolest-looking diner in New Jersey", The Star-Ledger, August 1, 2013. Accessed October 28, 2013. "There isn’t a diner quite like the Roadside Diner anywhere in Jersey.... Filmmaker John Sayles knew a great movie set when he saw one: He used the diner in his 1983 movie Baby It’s You, with Rosanna Arquette."
  33. ^ Dunphy, Dw. "New Jersey, Diners, And YouA Day Tripper look into two memorable spots to grab a quick bite.", ChathamPatch, March 30, 2012. Accessed October 28, 2013. "The [Roadside Diner] in Wall has been an area institution since the 1940s, at the intersection of Rt. 33 and 34 on the Collingwood Circle and was used as a location for the cover of the Bon Jovi album Crossroad. It’s also the location for the video to Bruce Springsteen’s song, 'Girls In Their Summer Clothes.' Can't get more Jersey than that."
  34. ^ Staff. "A.C.L.U. Suit for Removal of Creche and Menorah Is Denied", The New York Times, December 24, 1999. Accessed October 28, 2013. "Judge Alfred M. Wolin of United States District Court denied a motion to order the display in Wall Township, in Monmouth County, taken down before Christmas. He said at yesterday's hearing that the A.C.L.U. had known of the display since Dec. 2 but had entered the motion only on Dec. 20."
  35. ^ ACLU-NJ v. TOWNSHIP OF WALL, Leagle.com, April 3, 2001. Accessed October 28, 2013.
  36. ^ "Zip Codes". state.nj.us. The State of New Jersey. Retrieved 3 June 2014. 
  37. ^ Compendium of censuses 1726-1905: together with the tabulated returns of 1905, New Jersey Department of State, 1906. Accessed July 22, 2013.
  38. ^ Raum, John O. The History of New Jersey: From Its Earliest Settlement to the Present Time, Volume 1, p. 252, J. E. Potter and company, 1877. Accessed July 22, 2013. "Wall township was formed from Howell in 1851 Population in 1860, 2,283; and in 1870, 2,669." Population for 1870 is two less than the amount shown in the table based on other sources.
  39. ^ Staff. A compendium of the ninth census, 1870, p. 260. United States Census Bureau, 1872. Accessed July 22, 2013.
  40. ^ Porter, Robert Percival. Preliminary Results as Contained in the Eleventh Census Bulletins: Volume III - 51 to 75, p. 99. United States Census Bureau, 1890. Accessed August 9, 2012. Population for Wall township is listed as 3,829 for 1880 and 5,052 for 1890, which included the population for Manasquan town of 1,506 in 1890. Wall township's population for 1890 was calculated via subtraction as 3,546, which conflicts with the data from the 1910 Census.
  41. ^ Thirteenth Census of the United States, 1910: Population by Counties and Minor Civil Divisions, 1910, 1900, 1890, United States Census Bureau, p. 336. Accessed August 9, 2012.
  42. ^ Fifteenth Census of the United States : 1930 - Population Volume I, United States Census Bureau, p. 717. Accessed August 9, 2012.
  43. ^ New Jersey Resident Population by Municipality: 1930 - 1990, Workforce New Jersey Public Information Network, backed up by the Internet Archive as of May 2, 2009. Accessed August 9, 2012.
  44. ^ a b c d e Census 2000 Profiles of Demographic / Social / Economic / Housing Characteristics for Wall township, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed August 9, 2012.
  45. ^ a b c d e DP-1: Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: 2000 - Census 2000 Summary File 1 (SF 1) 100-Percent Data for Wall township, Monmouth County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed August 9, 2012.
  46. ^ DP03: Selected Economic Characteristics from the 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates for Wall township, Monmouth County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed June 21, 2012.
  47. ^ Form of Government, Wall Township. Accessed September 29, 2006.
  48. ^ Township Committee 2014, Wall Township. Accessed January 22nd, 2014.
  49. ^ Official Election Results - General Election November 6, 2012, Monmouth County, New Jersey Office of the Clerk. Accessed October 28, 2013.
  50. ^ Official Election Results - General Election November 8, 2011, Monmouth County, New Jersey Office of the Clerk. Accessed October 28, 2013.
  51. ^ Official Election Results - General Election November 2, 2010, Monmouth County, New Jersey Office of the Clerk. Accessed October 28, 2013.
  52. ^ Emergency Services and Info, Wall Township. Accessed July 22, 2013.
  53. ^ Home page, Wall Fire Company. Accessed July 22, 2013.
  54. ^ ABout, Wall Community First Aid Squad
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  113. ^ La Gorce, Tammy. "It’s the Lipstick That Draws Attention, and the Name Helps Too", The New York Times, March 16, 2008. Accessed November 17, 2008. "“Charlotte Sometimes is a girl in a book I read when I was little,” the singer explained at the Princess Diner here, where she used to hang out as a student at Wall High School.... She has lived in Wall Township all her life, having been adopted by her parents, Hartson and Tracy Poland, as a baby."
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