Wallington Hall

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For the public hall in London, see Wallington, London.

Coordinates: 55°09′07″N 1°57′25″W / 55.152°N 1.957°W / 55.152; -1.957

Wallington
Wallington Hall 02.jpg
Wallington is located in Northumberland
Wallington
Wallington
 Wallington shown within Northumberland
OS grid reference NZ028842
List of places
UK
England
Northumberland

Wallington is a country house and gardens located about 12 miles (19 km) west of Morpeth, Northumberland, England, near the village of Cambo. It has been owned by the National Trust since 1942, after it was donated complete with the estate and farms by Sir Charles Philips Trevelyan, the first donation of its kind. It is a Grade I listed building.

History[edit]

The estate was owned by the Fenwick family from 1475 until their financial problems caused them to sell their properties to the Blacketts. The hall house was rebuilt in 1688 around the ancient Pele Tower house for Sir William Blackett and was later substantially rebuilt again, in Palladian style, for Sir Walter Blackett by architect Daniel Garret, before passing to the Trevelyan family in 1777. Charles Philips Trevelyan inherited the property from his father George Otto Trevelyan in 1928.

After Pauline Jermyn married the naturalist Sir Walter Calverley Trevelyan, they began hosting literary and scientific figures at the Hall.[1] As a cultural centre, Wallington visitors included the members of the Pre-Raphaelite Brotherhood.

Set in 100 acres (40 ha) of rolling parkland, the estate includes a wooded dene (valley), ornamental lakes, lawns, and a recently refurbished walled garden.

Alongside the beautifully furnished interior, attractions inside the house include the desk where Thomas Babington Macaulay, brother-in-law of Charles Edward Trevelyan, wrote his History of England, a large collection of antique dollshouses and eight murals in the central hall depicting the history of Northumberland, painted by William Bell Scott.

The National Trust also own the estate of which the house is a part; the produce from these farms, as well as others in the region, is sold in a farm shop on site. The farm shop shut in 2012.

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