Walt Wilmot

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Walt Wilmot
Walt Wilmot.jpg
Outfielder
Born: (1865-10-18)October 18, 1865
Plover, Wisconsin
Died: February 1, 1929(1929-02-01) (aged 65)
Chicago, Illinois
Batted: Both Threw: Right
MLB debut
April 20, 1888 for the Washington Nationals
Last MLB appearance
June 14, 1898 for the New York Giants
Career statistics
Batting average .276
Home runs 58
Runs batted in 594
Stolen bases 381
Teams
Career highlights and awards
  • National League home run champion (1890)
  • Two seasons with a .300+ batting average (1893–94)
  • Three seasons with 100 or more runs scored (1890-91, 1894)
  • Two seasons with 70 or more stolen bases (1890, 1894)

Walter Robert Wilmot (October 18, 1863 – February 1, 1929) was a professional baseball player. He played all or part of 10 seasons in Major League Baseball with the Washington Nationals (1888–89), Chicago Colts (1890-95) and New York Giants (1897–98), primarily as an outfielder. Listed at 5 ft 9 in, 165 lb., Wilmot was a switch-hitter and threw right-handed. He was born in Plover, Wisconsin.

While playing for the Nationals in 1889, Wilmot led the league with 19 triples and 139 games played. The following season, he tied with Oyster Burns and Mike Tiernan for the National League lead in home runs with 13, also a career-high. He also set a career best with 76 stolen bases while driving in 99 runs in 1890. On the August 22, 1891, he became the first player in major league history to be walked 6 times in 1 game.[1]

Wilmot's most productive season came in 1894, when he posted career-highs in batting average (.330), runs scored (134), hits (197), RBI (130), doubles (45) and extra-base hits (62) in 133 games.

Overall in his ten-season career, Wilmot was a .276 hitter with 58 home runs and 594 RBI in 962 games, including 727 runs, 152 doubles, 92 triples, 381 stolen bases and a .337 on-base percentage.

Wilmot died in Chicago, Illinois, at the age of 65.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Solomon, Abbot Neil, "Baseball Records Illustrated", Quintet Publishing, London, 1988

External links[edit]