Walter Gratzer

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Walter B. Gratzer is a British biophysical chemist. He is professor emeritus of biophysical chemistry at King's College London[1] and an author and reviewer of popular science. He was the first Nature news correspondent appointed by editor John Maddox.[2] Oliver Sacks of Nature writes that his reviews have high literary quality and show knowledge of a wide range of topics.[3] He is a friend of James D. Watson, and wrote the introduction and afterword of his A Passion for DNA.[4]

Gratzer received his BA in chemistry in 1954 and his MA in 1958 from the University of Oxford, and his PhD in 1960 from the National Institute for Medical Research. He was a research fellow at Harvard University from 1960 to 1963, a lecturer in biophysics at King's from 1963 to 1966, and worked at the Medical Research Council from 1966 to 1996. He has been emeritus professor since 1997.[5]

Publications[edit]

Books[edit]

Reviews[edit]

Articles[edit]

Academic papers[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Gratzer, W. (2011). "Biophysics - whence, whither, wherefore - or Hold that hyphen". BMC Biology 9: 12. doi:10.1186/1741-7007-9-12. PMC 3055213. PMID 21371341.  edit
  2. ^ Gratzer, W. (2009). "Obituary: John Maddox (1925–2009)". Nature 458 (7241): 983–984. doi:10.1038/458983a. PMID 19396135.  edit.
  3. ^ a b Sacks, Oliver. "Bringing scientists to life", Nature 419: 786, 24 October 2002, accessed 10 November 2010. (subscription required) doi:10.1038/419786a.
  4. ^ Friedberg, Errol C. (2005). The Writing Life of James D. Watson, Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press, p. 111. ISBN 0-87969-700-8.
  5. ^ "Professor Walter Gratzer", King's College London, accessed 7 November 2010. Archived by WebCite on 7 November 2010.
  6. ^ Herbert, Roy. "To encourage insomnia", New Scientist 1690, 11 November 1989, p. 62, accessed 7 November 2010. See the copy at the New Scientist website. (subscription required)
  7. ^ "Squashing bishops and fighting newts", The Economist, issue 7634, p. 121, 23 December 1989.
  8. ^ Mbanya, Jean Claude. "A Bedside Nature: Genius and Eccentricity in Science 1869–1953", BMJ 312 (7039): 1169, 4 May 1996, accessed 10 November 2010. (subscription required)
  9. ^ "Who did what", New Scientist, issue, 2018, 24 February 1996, accessed 10 November 2010. (subscription required)
  10. ^ Bauer, Henry H. "The Undergrowth of Science: Delusion, Self-Deception and Human Frailty" PDF (69.3 KB) Journal of Scientific Exploration 15 (2): 291–293, 2001, accessed 7 November 2010. Archived by WebCite on 7 November 2010. Reviews webpage, archived 7 November 2010.
  11. ^ McSweegan, Edward. '"The Undergrowth of Science" by Walter Gratzer', Salon, 30 November 2000, accessed 7 November 2010. Archived by WebCite on 7 November 2010.
  12. ^ Stasiak, Andrzej. "Pathological science", EMBO Reports 2 (9): 762, 15 September 2001, accessed 7 November 2010. doi:10.1093/embo-reports/kve196. PMCID 1084050.
  13. ^ Tunstad, Erik. "Vitenskap på ville veier" (Norwegian) (Google Translate), Norwegian Broadcasting Corporation, 19 December 2000, updated, 10 June 2002, accessed 10 November 2010. Archived by WebCite on 10 November 2010.
  14. ^ "Eurekas and Euphorias", concatenation.org, accessed 7 November 2010. Archived by WebCite on 7 November 2010.
  15. ^ Matthews, Robert. "Telling tales", New Scientist, issue 2360, 14 September 2002, accessed 10 November 2010. (subscription required)
  16. ^ Ince, Martin. "Wars, women and discovery", Times Higher Education, 11 October 2002, accessed 10 November 2010. Archived by WebCite on 10 November 2010.
  17. ^ Carpenter, Kenneth J. "Terrors of the Table: the Curious History of Nutrition", American Journal of Clinical Nutrition 83 (3): 725, March 2006, accessed 7 November 2010. Archived by WebCite on 7 November 2010.
  18. ^ Hirst, Christopher. "Terrors of the Table, by Walter Gratzer", The Independent, 9 February 2007, accessed 7 November 2010. Archived by WebCite on 7 November 2010.
  19. ^ Kornberg, Hans. "Terrors of the table: the curious history of nutrition by Walter Gratzer", The FASEB Journal 21 (1): 5–7, 1 January 2007. doi:10.1096/fj.07-0102ufm. Archived by WebCite on 7 November 2010.
  20. ^ Youngman, Angela. "Book Review: Terrors of the Table by Walter Gratzer", Monsters and Critics, 20 February 2007, accessed 10 November 2010. Archived by WebCite on 10 November 2010.
  21. ^ Stern, Jane; Stern, Michael. "Something We Ate?", The New York Times, 4 December 2005, accessed 10 November 2010. Archived by WebCite on 10 November 2010.
  22. ^ Menger, Frederic, M. "Giant Molecules", Angewandte Chemie International Edition 49 (12): 4859, accessed 7 November 2010. Hosted by Wiley; first published online on 11 June 2010. doi:10.1002/anie.201003186. (subscription required)
  23. ^ Smidt, Scott. "Book Review of Giant Molecules: From Nylon to Nanotubes", Journal of Chemical Education 87 (9): 910, accessed 7 November 2010. Published online on 16 July 2010. doi:10.1021/ed100624d. Archived by WebCite on 7 November 2010. For the PDF, see "Giant Molecules: From Nylon to Nanotubes" PDF (549 KB), archived on 7 November 2010.
  24. ^ Jones, Richard. "A macromolecular history", Nature 464: 354, 18 March 2010, accessed 10 November 2010. (subscription required) doi:10.1038/464354a.

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