Walter Kerr Theatre

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Walter Kerr Theatre
Ritz Theatre
Walter Kerr Theatre NYC 2006 Grey Gardens.jpg
The marquee of the Walter Kerr Theatre in 2006
Address 219 West 48th Street
Manhattan, New York City
Owner Jujamcyn Theaters
Type Broadway theatre
Capacity 975
Production A Gentleman's Guide to Love and Murder
Construction
Opened 1929
Reopened 1990

The Walter Kerr Theatre is a Broadway theatre. Located at 219 West 48th Street, it is owned and operated by Jujamcyn Theaters. One of the smaller auditoriums in the Theater District, it seats 975.

The Shubert family engaged Herbert J. Krapp to design their Ritz Theatre in 1921. ABC operated it as a radio and then television studio between 1943 and 1965. The Shuberts sold the theatre to John Minary in 1956, who sold it to Joseph P. Blitz later that year.[1][2] In 1963, a partnership including Roger Euster acquired the property Euster sold his stake to Leonard B. Moore the following year.[3][4] It remained vacant from 1965 to 1971, when it reopened with the musical Soon, book by Martin Duberman, which closed after three performances. It housed a number of productions in the next two years and even screened adult films for a period before it became a children's theater named in honor of Robert F. Kennedy in 1973.[5][6][7] Jujamcyn acquired the property in 1980.[8] The last production staged at the Ritz was Chu Chem. On March 5, 1990, the theatre reopened after a $2 million restoration now renamed for theater critic Walter Kerr with August Wilson's The Piano Lesson.[9] Since then it has housed seven winners of the Tony Award for Best Play: Angels in America: Millennium Approaches, Angels in America: Perestroika, Love! Valour! Compassion!, Proof, Take Me Out, Doubt, and Clybourne Park.

Other notable productions[edit]

Box Office Record[edit]

The Broadway revival of A Little Night Music, starring Catherine Zeta-Jones and Angela Lansbury, achieved the box office record for the Walter Kerr Theatre. The production grossed $1,031,543 over eight performances, for the week ending January 3, 2010.[10]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Zolotow, Sam (July 18, 1956). "Ritz Theatre Sold". The New York Times. Retrieved 2014-05-08. 
  2. ^ "48th St. Theatre Sold to Investor". The New York Times. December 21, 1956. Retrieved 2014-05-08. 
  3. ^ "Theater Building on 48th St. Sold". The New York Times. April 5, 1964. Retrieved 2014-05-08. 
  4. ^ "The Little Theater Changes Ownership". The New York Times. June 4, 1964. Retrieved 2014-05-08. 
  5. ^ Calta, Louis (February 17, 1972). "Ritz Theater Makes Broadway Return". The New York Times. Retrieved 2014-05-08. 
  6. ^ "Doctor in the House Changes Character". The New York Times. September 20, 1973. Retrieved 2014-05-08. 
  7. ^ "Metropolitan Briefs: Kennedy Theater Evicted". The New York Times. May 5, 1976. Retrieved 2014-05-08. 
  8. ^ Blau, Eleanor (November 19, 1981). "Ritz Theater to Return as a Broadway House". The New York Times. Retrieved 2014-05-08. 
  9. ^ Rothstein, Mervyn (March 6, 1990). "Broadway Musical Tribute To the Critic Walter Kerr". The New York Times. Retrieved 2014-05-08. 
  10. ^ "Broadway Grosses-A LITTLE NIGHT MUSIC: 2010". broadwayworld.com. Retrieved 2014-05-08. 

External links[edit]