List of Carroll Pioneers head football coaches

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Jack Fries was first a player and then later head coach at Carroll.

The Carroll Pioneers football program is a college football team that represents Carroll University in the Midwest Conference, a part of NCAA Division III. The team has had 27 head coaches since its first recorded football game in 1896. The current coach is Mark Krzykowski who first took the position for the 2011 season.[1][2]

Key[edit]

Key to symbols in coaches list
General Overall Conference Postseason[A 1]
# Order of coaches[A 2] GC Games coached CW Conference wins PW Postseason wins
DC Division championships OW Overall wins CL Conference losses PL Postseason losses
CC Conference championships OL Overall losses CT Conference ties PT Postseason ties
NC National championships OT Overall ties[A 3] C% Conference winning percentage
dagger Elected to the College Football Hall of Fame O% Overall winning percentage[A 4]


Coaches[edit]

# Name Term GC OW OL OT O% CW CL CT C% PW PL CCs Awards
1 Ward A. Wescott 1896 10 5 3 2 .600
2 J. G. Britton 1898 10 3 5 2 .400
3 John D. Schwender 1899–1905 26 15 9 2 .615
4 Mark D. Nave 1901–1903 19 8 7 4 .526
5 Harrison McJohnston 1908 6 1 5 0 .167
6 Wilfred C. Bleamaster 1909–1911 20 12 6 2 .650
7 William Davies 1912 9 2 6 1 .278
8 Henry W. Lever 1913 7 2 2 3 .500
9 John Edmund Fries 1914–1920 30 11 14 5 .450
10 Roy E. Haberman 1919 7 4 3 0 .571
11 C. C. Boone 1921 7 1 6 0 .143
12 Madison A. "Matty" Bell 1922 7 3 4 0 .429
13 Phillip Norris "Army" Armstrong 1923–1930 61 44 11 6 .770
14 Vincent P. Batha 1931 6 1 4 1 .250
15 Glenn Thistlethwaite 1932–1933 13 10 2 1 .808
16 Elmer A. Lampe 1934–1937 28 17 7 4 .679
17 John W. Breen 1938–1948 58 36 15 7 .681
18 Francis J. "Mickey" McCormick 1949–1957 69 37 31 1 .543
19 Lisle Blackbourn 1958 8 6 2 0 .750
20 Vince DiFrancesca 1959–1971 110 62 43 5 .586
21 Steve Miller 1972–1976 46 30 15 1 .663
22 Robert Larsen 1977 9 4 5 0 .444
23 Mark W. Williams 1978–1981 36 12 24 0 .333
24 Merle Masonholder 1978–2000 175 88 87 0 .503
25 Jeff Voris 2001–2005 49 15 34 0 .306
26 Henny Hiemenz 2006–2010 53 30 23 0 .566
27 Mark Krzykowski align="center"|2011– 0 0 0 0

Details[edit]

The following are details on coaches that do not have articles on Wikipedia. For coaches with articles on Wikipedia, see links in the table above.

Ward A. Wescott[edit]

Playing history[edit]

Oconto Eleven[edit]

Wescott played for the Oconto, Wisconsin town team in 1895 and played a game against the team that would become the Green Bay Packers. Wescott was both a player and trainer, receiving accolades for his abilities to teach the game as well as to play.[6]

Coaching history[edit]

Carroll College[edit]

Wescott was the second head coach at Carroll and he held that position for the 1896 season. Preliminary reports predicted a "lively" season.[7] Wescott's players were predicted as promising before the season began.[8]

Controversy was stirred up after a game against Milwaukee East High School on October 17, 1896. Carroll won the game 4-0, but the opposing team disputed the result.[9] The next season's game was cancelled because Carroll was regularly using "ringers" or players that were brought in to the team from outside the school specifically to win games. [10]

High School[edit]

Wescott later went on to coach the successful Eau Claire, Wisconsin high school team in 1902.[11]

J. G. Britton[edit]

Britton was the head coach during a game witnessed by Miss Anna Sackett, who found the game to be so brutal that she revoked $5,000 (a sizeable sum at the time) from her will that had been bequested to Carroll College. She claimed that the "players were brutes" and would no longer support the school if they continued play.[12] Later that same year (October 29), she died and left none of the funds to the college.[13]

Charles C. Boone[edit]

Boone pictured in The Hinakaga 1922, Carroll yearbook

While Boone was the coach, college president William Arthur Ganfield boasted that within four year's time Carroll will be beating the Wisconsin Badgers in football.[14] In his one year of coaching, the team fell far short of that mark with its one win for the season and was outscored by 119 to 14 and left fans and the school administration sorely disappointed.

Vincent P. Batha[edit]

Vincent P. Batha, head football coach 1931

Athletics[edit]

Playing history[edit]

Batha played tackle[15] for Carroll. The school honored his legacy by inducting him into their "Hall of Fame" in 1973[16] as a "charter member" of the group.[17]

Coaching history[edit]

Batha later became the 16th head football coach for his alma mater[18] and he held that position for the 1931 season.[19] His career coaching record at Carroll College was 1 win, 4 losses, and 1 tie. This ranks him 26th at Carroll College in total wins and 25th at Carroll College in winning percentage.[20] He would remain with the program as assistant coach[21] under Glenn Thistlethwaite beginning in 1932.[22] Coach Batha's poor performance was called the worst start in seven years for the program, which was attributed to weakness at the end positions and turnover in the backfield.[23]

Batha also was the head basketball coach at Carroll from 1931 until 1934, posting the 12th-most wins at the history of the school (as of 2007-2008 season) with a record of 29-13.[24] He also was assistant Athletic Director and head coach of the track and field and cross country running teams.[25]

Academics[edit]

While at Carroll, Batha also was an instructor of physics,[26] mathematics,[27] and physical education.[28] Carroll college set up a memorial carillon in his memory.[29] One of his greatest joys was helping young men succeed in college and life.[30]

Batha earned a Master of Science from the University of Wisconsin in 1929 and completed research on platinum and its reflective power as varied by temperature.[31]

During World War II, Batha served as a flight instructor at Carroll for the United States Army Air Corps. The eight-week curriculum consisted of mathematics, navigation, and aviation operation. The program was coordinated through the college and taught at Waukesha County Airport.[32]

Personal life[edit]

Batha was very active in the Boy Scouts of America and was awarded the Silver Beaver in 1949.[33] He was also active with the Kiwanis organization.[34] He was killed in an automobile accident on December 21, 1956.[35]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Although the first Rose Bowl Game was played in 1902, it has been continuously played since the 1916 game, and is recognized as the oldest bowl game by the NCAA. "—" indicates any season prior to 1916 when postseason games were not played.[3]
  2. ^ A running total of the number of head coaches, with coaches who served separate tenures being counted only once. Interim head coaches are represented with "Int" and are not counted in the running total. "—" indicates the team played but either without a coach or no coach is on record. "X" indicates an interim year without play.
  3. ^ Overtime rules in college football were introduced in 1996, making ties impossible in the period since.[4]
  4. ^ When computing the win–loss percentage, a tie counts as half a win and half a loss.[5]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Carroll (WI) Football Won/Loss History". National Collegiate Athletic Association. Retrieved November 8, 2010. 
  2. ^ "Season by season football results". Carroll University. Retrieved 8 November 2010. 
  3. ^ National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) (2011). Bowl/All-Star Game Records (PDF). Indianapolis, Indiana: NCAA. pp. 5–10. Archived from the original on August 22, 2011. Retrieved August 21, 2011. 
  4. ^ Whiteside, Kelly (August 25, 2006). "Overtime system still excites coaches". USA Today (McLean, Virginia). Archived from the original on November 24, 2009. Retrieved September 25, 2009. 
  5. ^ Finder, Chuck (September 6, 1987). "Big plays help Paterno to 200th". The New York Times (New York City). Archived from the original on October 22, 2009. Retrieved October 22, 2009. 
  6. ^ Before They Were the Packers By Denis J. Gullickson, Carl Hanson
  7. ^ The Milwaukee Journal September 3, 1896
  8. ^ Chicago Tribune "PREPARING FOR GREAT GAMES AT THE MADISON UNIVERSITY" March 26, 1896
  9. ^ Milwaukee Journal-Sentinel "The Duffel Bag-This Week 100 years ago" October 17, 1996
  10. ^ The Milwaukee Journal "Events on the Gridiron" October 9, 1896
  11. ^ Leader-Telegram "City dominated state football in the early 1900s" By Richard D. Cornell and Jerry Poling, November 2, 2008
  12. ^ Chicago Daily Tribune "Costly Ball Game", November 6, 1898
  13. ^ Waukesha Freeman "Football cost $5000-One Game Expensive for Carroll College" November 3, 1898
  14. ^ Wisconsin Rapids Daily Tribune "Carroll's New President Talks of Centre's Teams" September 28, 1921
  15. ^ Carroll College Yearbook "Football - Season 1919" page 135
  16. ^ Carroll University Alumni Hall of Fame
  17. ^ Milwaukee Journal "Carroll Honors 12 Alumni" Oct 4, 1973
  18. ^ Chicago Tribune "HANLEY ORDERS 2 DRILLS DAILY DESPITE THE HEAT" September 15, 1931
  19. ^ Stevens Point Daily Journal "Sports--Nineteen Candidates Report for Workouts" September 15, 1931
  20. ^ Carroll College/University Football coaching records
  21. ^ Chicago Daily Tribune "Thistlethwaite Takes Carroll Coaching Job" May 14, 1932
  22. ^ New York Times "Thistlethwaite Gets Post" May 14, 1932
  23. ^ The Milwaukee Sentinel "Pioneers Play Viking Eleven" November 6, 1931
  24. ^ Carroll University Basketball results
  25. ^ Carroll University Yearbook 1930
  26. ^ Waukesha Daily Freeman June 15, 1949
  27. ^ Waukesha County Obituaries
  28. ^ Sheboygan Journal "Sports" March 6, 1931
  29. ^ Wisconsin Academy Review Vol. 4, No. 2 (Spring 1957), Walter E. Scott
  30. ^ The TKE (Tau Kappe Epsilon) "The Charles R. Walgreen, Jr. TKE Leadership Academy" winter 2008
  31. ^ Scientific Commons "Temperature effect on reflecting power of platinum and measurement of thickness of gold film" by Vincent P. Batha, 1929
  32. ^ Carroll University "From the College Archives" October 15, 2001
  33. ^ Pottawatomie Area Council, Boy Scouts of America Silver Beaver recipients
  34. ^ Milwaukee Road Magazine March 1951, page 8
  35. ^ "Bells will be Batha memorial". The Milwaukee Sentinel. January 24, 1957. p. 6. Retrieved Nove3mber 28, 2011.  Check date values in: |accessdate= (help)