Warthill

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Coordinates: 53°59′29″N 0°58′10″W / 53.9913°N 0.9695°W / 53.9913; -0.9695

Warthill
Warthill.jpg
Warthill
Warthill is located in North Yorkshire
Warthill
Warthill
 Warthill shown within North Yorkshire
Population 241 (2001 census for Warthill Parish)
OS grid reference SE675555
District Ryedale
Shire county North Yorkshire
Region Yorkshire and the Humber
Country England
Sovereign state United Kingdom
Post town YORK
Postcode district YO19
Dialling code 01904
Police North Yorkshire
Fire North Yorkshire
Ambulance Yorkshire
EU Parliament Yorkshire and the Humber
UK Parliament Thirsk and Malton (formerly Ryedale)
List of places
UK
England
Yorkshire

Warthill is a village and civil parish in the Ryedale district of North Yorkshire, England, six miles north-east of York and 14 miles south-west of Malton.

The village has one public house, The Agar Arms, and a Church of England primary school (established in 1863), with about forty pupils.

Warthill is home to St Mary's Church, which was built in the 19th century and is a good example of Victorian Gothic architecture.

Brockfield Hall, a Georgian house completed in 1807, is situated nearby. It was built for Benjamin Agar by Peter Atkinson senior who worked in the office of John Carr (architect). Brockfield has an oval entry hall with cantilevered staircase. The house displays fine art and furniture, and mementos associated with the Fitzalan Howard family. There is also an unusual collection of glass walking sticks.

The house is rectangular in plan, with a hipped slate roof. The most immediately noticeable feature is a large Venetian window on the first floor which is set in a semi-circular arch of stone panels. Below is an ironwork balcony with stands above the entry porch. The interior serves partly as a display space for paintings by the Staithes group of artists.

Railway[edit]

Warthill was served by Warthill railway station which was on the York to Beverley Line between 1847 and 1959.[1]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Butt, R. V. J. (1995). The Directory of Railway Stations: details every public and private passenger station, halt, platform and stopping place, past and present (1st ed.). Sparkford: Patrick Stephens Ltd. ISBN 1-8526-0508-1. OCLC 60251199. 

External links[edit]